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Caster Semenya could be forced to undertake hormone therapy for future Olympics

Study shows performance-boosting effects of testosterone in female athletes, reopening controversial debate about intersex and hyperandrogenous competitorsUsing testosterone to categorise male and female athletes isn ’t perfect, but it’s the best solution we haveCaster Semenya, the Olympic 800m champion, may be banned from competing at future Games unless she undergoes hormone replacement therapy (HRT) or even surgery in the wake of a landmark study into athletes with raised testosterone levels which has just been published.The International Association of Athletics Federations, the world governing body, commissioned research which has produced the most conclusive evidence yet that female athletes with very high levels of naturally occurring testosterone receive significant performance-enhancing benefits in competition.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Athletics Caster Semenya IAAF Sport Science World news Olympic Games Sport politics Gender Source Type: news

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CONCLUSIONS: A small single trial contributed evidence of moderate quality that the use of growth hormone for a year may improve height velocity of children with thalassaemia although height SD score in the treatment group was similar to the control group. There are no randomised controlled trials in adults or trials that address the use of growth hormone therapy over a longer period and assess its effect on final height and quality of life. The optimal dosage of growth hormone and the ideal time to start this therapy remain uncertain. Large well-designed randomised controlled trials over a longer period with sufficient du...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
According to a study published inJAMA, women who take hormone replacement therapy may be no more likely to die prematurely than women who do not take hormones.Reuters 
Source: Society for Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news
For decades now, women navigating menopause have been buffeted by shifting research findings on the risks and possible benefits of hormone-replacement therapy. Now, a landmark clinical trial that followed more than 27,000 subjects for roughly 18 years has offered some conclusive evidence that neither...
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - Category: Science Authors: Source Type: news
(Reuters Health) - Women who take hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to ease menopause symptoms like hot flashes and night sweats may be no more likely to die prematurely than women who don ’t take hormones, a new study suggests.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
The pendulum has swung from one extreme to the other when it comes to hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to treat symptoms of menopause. At first, the replacement hormones—mostly a combination of estrogen and progestin to replace what the body stops making after menopause—were seen as a panacea. Doctors thought they could not only relieve hot flashes and night sweats, but also prevent chronic aging diseases like heart problems and weakening bones. But studies then found that the supplement hormones could lead to a higher risk of breast cancer—and that they didn’t protect the heart after all. In the l...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Drugs estrogen Hormone Therapy hormones for menopause hot flashes night sweats progestin Reproductive Health treating menopause Source Type: news
Dr JoAnn Manson is the lead author of a new report that examined all-cause and cause-specific mortality among women who have taken hormone replacement therapy for menopausal symptoms.Medscape Ob/Gyn
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health Commentary Source Type: news
Does genetic testing for ERα gene polymorphisms provide new possibilities of treatment for cognitive function disorders in postmenopausal women? Arch Med Sci. 2017 Aug;13(5):1224-1232 Authors: Gujski M, Pinkas J, Wierzbińska-Stępniak A, Owoc A, Bojar I Abstract It is commonly considered that cognitive abilities decrease with age, especially with respect to processing and psychomotor speed. It is an interesting issue whether, apart from the ageing process, the undergoing of menopause itself deteriorates cognitive functions, compared to women at reproductive age. Hopes for improvement of cognitiv...
Source: Archives of Medical Science - Category: General Medicine Tags: Arch Med Sci Source Type: research
Abstract Several lines of investigation have shown a protective role for estrogen in Alzheimer's disease through a number of biological actions. This review examines studies of the role of estrogen-related factors in age at onset and risk for Alzheimer's disease in women with Down syndrome, a population at high risk for early onset of dementia. The studies are consistent in showing that early age at menopause and that low levels of endogenous bioavailable estradiol in postmenopausal women with Down syndrome are associated with earlier age at onset and overall risk for dementia. Polymorphisms in genes associated wi...
Source: Free Radical Biology and Medicine - Category: Biology Authors: Tags: Free Radic Biol Med Source Type: research
Summary Female middle age is characterized by a decline in skeletal muscle mass and performance, predisposing women to sarcopenia, functional limitations, and metabolic dysfunction as they age. Menopausal loss of ovarian function leading to low circulating level of 17β‐estradiol has been suggested as a contributing factor to aging‐related muscle deterioration. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown and thus far androgens have been considered as a major anabolic hormone for skeletal muscle. We utilized muscle samples from 24 pre‐ and postmenopausal women to establish proteome‐wide p...
Source: Aging Cell - Category: Cytology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
ABSTRACT IntroductionThe aim was to evaluate and stratify early cardiovascular risk of transsexuals undergone pharmacological and/or surgical gender reassignment. MethodsFifty‐six transsexuals were divided into two groups: 1‐ undergone gonadectomy (orchiectomy for trans women and hystero‐annessiectomy for trans men); group 2‐ hormone replacement therapy alone. All underwent carotid artery intima‐media thickness (C‐IMT) and flow‐mediated vasodilation (FMD) of brachial artery evaluations. ResultsFMD was lower in patients undergone gonadectomy as compared to not‐ surgically treated patients (Group 1: 5.711 vs ...
Source: Internal Medicine Journal - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
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