Urazy g łowy u dzieci – aktualne algorytmy diagnostyczno-lecznicze

Publication date: Available online 25 May 2017 Source:Pediatria Polska Author(s): Paulina Urban, Piotr Chądzyński, Kamila Saramak, Sergiusz Jóźwiak Head injuries in children are a common cause of consultation in emergency department. Glasgow Coma Scale (GSC) and, in case of infants, modified Glasgow Coma Scale are widely used for the evaluation of symptoms severity and divide head trauma into mild, moderate and severe. Guidelines concerning preliminary approach to mild head injury are based on the risk factors of intracranial injury. Risk of injury assessment criteria proposed by Polish Association of Paediatric Surgeons indicate the best places of medical consultation. Several guidelines concerning utility of head computed tomography (PECARN − Paediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network, CHALICE − Children's Head Injury Algorithm for the Prediction of Important Clinical Events, CATCH − Canadian Assessment of Tomography for Childhood Head Injury) as well as time of patient observation and repetition of computed tomography scan were proposed. Special attention should be directed towards young athletes; in their case Child SCAT3 (Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 3) and SCAT3 are recommended. The goal of medical care of children with severe head trauma is mainly to eliminate secondary injury. Patients often require intensive monitoring and treatment of hypoxia, hypotension, hyperthermia and increased intracranial pressure. The clinicians shoul...
Source: Pediatria Polska - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: research

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BACKGROUND: The American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine (ACRM) in 2010 called for more head injury research on gender disparities to bridge the gender gap for the short-and long-term effects of TBI, including sexual and reproductive outcomes. In this ...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news
Quanterix has reached another step in its goal to advance a blood-based test to detect concussions in athletes. The Billerica, MA-based company said researchers have successfully applied the Single Molecule Array (Simoa) technology to generate data on the value of blood biomarkers as research tools to study pathophysiological mechanisms of concussion and as potential clinical tools and objective indicators for sports-related concussions (SRCs) and mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBIs). Results have been published in JAMA Network Open, demonstrate the promise of blood biomarkers to serve as clinical tools for objectively id...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Business Source Type: news
The diagnosis of concussion remains challenging, particularly in cases where several months have passed between a head injury and clinical assessment. Tracking multiple moving objects in three-dimensional (3D) space engages many of the same cognitive proce...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news
A 49-year-old female with history of daily inhaled corticosteroid use for asthma presented to a concussion clinic 7 wk after sport-related head injury with headache, visual blurring, dizziness, nausea, fatigue, polydipsia, and polyuria. Examination reveale...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news
Sports-related concussion in cycling Sports-related concussion (SRC) is a recognised sport-related injury and a growing global public health concern,1 accounting for between 1.3% and 9.1% of all injuries reported during cycling events.2 Road cycling, ...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news
Conclusions: Macrostructural abnormality on CT was associated with worse functional outcome at one week post MTBI. PMID: 31550173 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Brain Injury - Category: Neurology Tags: Brain Inj Source Type: research
Rates of concussion in soccer are high, especially in female players. The primary aim of this study was to examine differences in self-reported concussion-related symptoms (CRS), balance (BESS), and neurocognitive performance (ImPACT) following an acute bo...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news
Post-traumatic headache (PTH) is one of the most common, debilitating, and difficult symptoms to manage after a traumatic head injury. Although the mechanisms underlying PTH remain elusive, recent studies in rodent models suggest the potential involvement of calcitonin gene–related peptide (CGRP), a mediator of neurogenic inflammation, and the ensuing activation of meningeal mast cells (MCs), proalgesic resident immune cells that can lead to the activation of the headache pain pathway. Here, we investigated the relative contribution of MCs to the development of PTH-like pain behaviors in a model of mild closed-head i...
Source: Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Research Paper Source Type: research
Conclusion The willingness of young males to engage in dangerous situations might be adaptive in terms of fitness maximization. Nonetheless, for some individuals this intense sexual competition can be detrimental to health. The correspondence between the age distribution of the reproductively most active population and those suffering sTBI only partially supports the evolutionary hypothesis about risk-taking behavior. The prevalence of higher external mortality rates of young males, on the other hand, was not present in our data at all, nor did we find any support for the assumption that sTBI acquired from riskier behavio...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
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