Hormone Therapy Not Advised for Preventing Disease After Menopause

TUESDAY, May 16, 2017 -- Using hormone therapy to prevent chronic health issues, such as heart disease and bone loss, in postmenopausal women may do more harm than good, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) says. After reviewing current...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

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Objective: To test the hypothesis that a family history of premature myocardial infarction (FHPMI) will modify the associations between bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) and mortality due to heart disease (HD), cardiovascular disease (CVD), or all-cause mortality with stronger associations observed for BSO occurring before 45 years. Methods: We analyzed data from 2,763 postmenopausal women aged 40 years or older who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994) and were followed through December 31, 2015. Cox regression was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% co...
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Original Studies Source Type: research
Conclusion: The decline in ET utilization had differential disease and expenditure consequences by age groups in the United States. These results are limited by the lack of inclusion of vasomotor symptom benefit and costs of alternative medications for these symptoms in the analysis.
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Original Studies Source Type: research
Can women in menopause get the benefits of hormone replacement therapy without the risks? Anew UCLA study conducted with mice points in that direction, but additional research is necessary.Women commonly experience hot flashes and weight gain, among other changes, during and after menopause. Hormone therapy, which gives women additional estrogen, can help alleviate some of these symptoms, but it has been linked to a higher risk of heart disease and breast cancer.UCLA life scientists now report that a gene called reprimo, which is expressed by certain neurons in the brain, may play a role in menopause-related weight gain, a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
(The North American Menopause Society (NAMS)) Hormone therapy has proven to slow down heart fat deposition and the progression of atherosclerosis, depending on the type of hormone therapy and route of administration. A new study compared the effects of conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) and 17β-estradiol and contrasted oral and transdermal delivery to determine their effectiveness in preventing heart disease. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Sleep disturbances such as insomnia are extremely common, especially in women after menopause. According to data from the National Institutes of Health, sleep disturbance varies from 16% to 42% before menopause, from 39% to 47% during perimenopause, and from 35% to 60% after menopause. Insomnia is a serious medical problem defined by frequent difficulty falling or staying asleep that impacts a person’s life in a negative way. Hormone changes around menopause can lead to sleep problems for many reasons, including changing sleep requirements, increased irritability, and hot flashes. What menopausal women eat could have...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Fatigue Food as medicine Healthy Eating Menopause Nutrition Sleep Source Type: blogs
Did you ever wonder why medical research seems to flip-flop so often? Eggs used to be terrible for your health; now they’re not so bad. Stomach ulcers were thought to be due to stress and a “type A personality” but that’s been disproven. I was taught that every postmenopausal woman should take hormone replacement therapy to prevent heart disease and bone loss; now it’s considered way too risky. It can make you question every bit of medical news you hear. But maybe that’s not such a bad thing. Questioning what you read or hear is reasonable. And maybe medical reversals — when new re...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Medical Research Prevention Tests and procedures Source Type: blogs
Excess body weight is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Research suggests that’s because too much body fat can elevate levels of sex hormones like estrogen, especially among postmenopausal women. But despite knowing there is a correlation between extra weight and breast cancer, it’s been difficult to study how losing that weight could affect an individual woman’s chance of developing cancer. Now, a new paper published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute provides encouraging evidence that, for women 50 and older, virtually any amount of sustained weight loss translates to a reductio...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Cancer embargoed study Source Type: news
Conclusion: CV risk calculation should be considered by clinicians in order to exclude patients with high CV risk, in whom MHT is contraindicated. Assessing risks and benefits in a patient-centered approach according to individual's features, health status, and personal preferences is important in order to realize a safe and effective treatment. PMID: 31500138 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Medicina (Kaunas) - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Medicina (Kaunas) Source Type: research
Conclusions: CaD did not consistently modify the effect of CEE therapy or CEE + MPA therapy on CVD events. However, the increased risk of stroke due to CEE therapy appears to be mitigated by CaD supplementation. In contrast, CaD supplementation did not influence the risk of stroke due to CEE + MPA.
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Maunil K. Desai1 and Roberta Diaz Brinton2,3* 1School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States 2Center for Innovation in Brain Science, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, United States 3Departments of Pharmacology and Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, United States Women have a higher incidence and prevalence of autoimmune diseases than men, and 85% or more patients of multiple autoimmune diseases are female. Women undergo sweeping endocrinological changes at least twice during their lifetime, puberty and menopause, with many women undergoin...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
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