Risk Categorization Predicts Disability in Pain-associated Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders After 6 Months

Discussion: A simple approach to risk categorization can identify youth with FGIDs who are most likely to report increased levels of pain-related impairment over time. These findings have important clinical implications that support the utility of a brief screening process during medical care to inform referral for targeted treatment approaches to FGIDs.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Original Articles: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

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Conclusions: Following oesophago-gastric cancer surgery, patients experience physical and psychosocial difficulties which can hamper recovery, but many of which are amenable to rehabilitative intervention. Accordingly, rehabilitative measures throughout the early stages of recovery require investigation. Implications for Rehabilitation Curative treatment for oesophageal and gastric cancer is associated with significant risk of post-operative morbidity, resulting in a myriad of physical and nutritional challenges which may impact on post-operative physical recovery. Greater provision of physiotherapy services to counteract ...
Source: Disability and Rehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Tags: Disabil Rehabil Source Type: research
Pediatric chronic pain is associated with risk of impact across social, emotional, and behavioral domains at child and family levels.30,52,67 Extant literature highlights psychosocial factors that can foster resilience and others that underlie vulnerability for poor pain coping and disability. Resilience factors, such as pain acceptance and psychosocial adjustment, have been found to promote the use of adaptive pain coping strategies within this population.14 Greater child and parent pain catastrophizing, clinically significant internalizing symptoms (e.g., anxiety, depression), and maladaptive parent responses (e.g., over...
Source: The Journal of Pain - Category: Materials Science Authors: Tags: Original Reports Source Type: research
AbstractLatinx are one of the largest and most rapidly growing segments of the United States (U.S.) population that is significantly impacted by health disparities, including somatic health problems. Young Latinx adults (ages 18 –25 years) are at a greater risk for being affected by such health inequalities and there is a need to understand individual-based differences that may contribute to and maintain somatic symptoms, including pain experience, pain beliefs, and perceptions of health. Thus, the current study investig ated the explanatory role of worry in association between pain intensity, pain disability, p...
Source: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
ConclusionsStrongly believing that thinking about pain helps you solve problems or cope with pain (positive metacognition), or that it is harmful and uncontrollable (negative metacognition), can increase the amount you worry or ruminate as pain increases. This is associated with increased pain catastrophizing. Identifying and modifying these unhelpful pain metacognitions may improve treatments for pain catastrophizing and thereby chronic pain generally.
Source: European Journal of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
Authors: Michaelides A, Zis P Abstract Pain is a subjective experience that is influenced by genetics, gender, social, cultural and personal parameters. Opposed to chronic pain, which by definition has to last for at least 3 months, acute pain is mostly because of trauma, acute medical conditions or treatment. The link between mood disorders and acute pain has proven to be increasingly significant since the link is bi-directional, and both act as risk factors for each other. Depression and anxiety are associated with increased perception of pain severity, whereas prolonged duration of acute pain leads to increased ...
Source: Postgraduate Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Postgrad Med Source Type: research
AbstractIntroductionSystemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disease characterized by progressive fibrosis of the skin and internal organs, leading to their failure and disturbances in the morphology and function of blood vessels. The disease affects people in different ways, and identifying how the difficulties and limitations are related to quality of life may contribute to designing helpful interventions. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with quality of life in people with SSc.MethodsThis was a cross-sectional study conducted in 11 rheumatic centres in Poland. Patients diagnosed with SSc w...
Source: Quality of Life Research - Category: Health Management Source Type: research
Today’s post is another one where there’s very little to guide my thinking… Have you ever wondered why we read so much research looking at the characteristics of the people who look for help with their pain – yet not nearly as much about us, the people who do the helping? There are studies about us – thanks Ben – and others! (Darlow, Dowell, Baxter, Mathieson, Perr &Dean, 2013; Farin, Gramm &Schmidt, 2013; Parsons, Harding, Breen, Foster, Pincus, Vogel &Underwood, 2007). We know some things are helpful for people with pain: things like listening capabilities (Matthias, Ba...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Coping strategies Pain conditions Professional topics Research Science in practice attitudes beliefs communication nocebo Source Type: blogs
Low back pain and neck pain are the leading causes of disability.14 Major depressive and anxiety disorders are the third and ninth leading causes of disability.14 Moreover, spinal pain, depression and anxiety often coexist: 15-45% of people with persistent pain also experience some form of depression and/or anxiety.3,25,26 When these comorbidities exist, healthcare costs are considerable higher.28
Source: The Journal of Pain - Category: Materials Science Authors: Tags: Original Reports Source Type: research
BACKGROUND Older trauma patients have increased risk of adverse in-hospital outcomes. We previously demonstrated that low preinjury Palliative Performance Scale (PPS) independently predicted poor discharge outcomes. We hypothesized that low PPS would predict long-term outcomes in older trauma patients. METHODS Prospective observational study of trauma patients aged ≥55 years admitted between July 2016 and April 2018. Preinjury PPS was assessed at admission; low PPS was defined as 70 or less. Primary outcomes were mortality and functional outcomes, measured by Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE), at discharge and ...
Source: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery - Category: Surgery Tags: AAST 2018 PODIUM PAPER Source Type: research
The last 30 years or more of pain research and management have been exciting for us pain nerds. We’ve learned so much about processes involved in nociception, about the psychology of our responses to nociceptive input, about treatments (that often don’t work terribly well), and we’ve discovered that we (mainly) don’t know what we don’t know. There are some big questions though, that have yet to be answered – and don’t yet share the limelight that neurobiological processes seem to hog. Here are a few of my big questions. How do we alter public health policy to move from an acute ...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Motivation Pain conditions Professional topics Science in practice questions Source Type: blogs
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