Scientists discover how a decades-old drug reduces the size of a heart attack

Scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III (CNIC) have discovered a new mechanism of action of metoprolol, a drug that can reduce the damage produced during a heart attack if administered early. The team led by Dr. Borja Ibáñez, Clinical Research Director at the CNIC and cardiologist at the Fundación Jiménez Díaz University Hospital Health Research Institute (IIS-FJD), has identified the mechanism that explains why this drug is so beneficial: rapid administration of metoprolol during a heart attack directly inhibits the inflammatory action of neutrophils, a type of blood cell.
Source: World Pharma News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

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A Twitter poll found that most cardiologists have reported a 40% to 60% reduction in hospital admissions for heart attacks as the coronavirus pandemic continues to spread.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 6 April 2020Source: Canadian Journal of CardiologyAuthor(s): Mohammad I. Zia, Venkat Ramanan, Idan Roifman, Kim A. Connelly, Graham A. Wright, Nilesh R. Ghugre
Source: Canadian Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Coronary-artery-bypass grafting (CABG) is associated with lower in-hospital mortality in myocardial infarction (MI) complicated by cardiogenic shock, compared with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), according to a database study.Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - Category: Surgery Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news
HOW to live longer: Prevent an early death by eating a healthy, balanced diet, and by doing regular exercise. But you could also increase your life expectancy and lower your risk of heart attack symptoms and signs and early death by adding this cheap snack to your daily routine.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
In most cell therapies, the transplanted cells do not survive for long, or in large numbers. They produce beneficial effects, such as reduced inflammation or enhanced regeneration, via signaling that changes the behavior of native cell populations. Considerable effort is going into finding ways to make cells used in therapy survive for a longer period of time following transplantation. The approach taken here is to engineer a fraction of the transplanted cells to produce a growth factor that improves the survival of the others. The results are demonstrated in an animal model, showing a greater regeneration of heart muscle....
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
Since the onset of the novel coronavirus COVID-19, hospital emergency departments have seen a precipitous drop in the number of heart attack patients presenting for treatment. The big question is why? Are there really less heart attacks occurring, or are patients staying home, afraid to come to the hospital for fear of contracting the virus? There's good reason to believe that the latter may be the case, and the implications are extremely troubling.
Source: News from Angioplasty.Org - Category: Cardiology Source Type: news
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Source: JAMA - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Conclusions: Our study results were not consistent with the hypothesis that PPI use increases MI risk among people without known heart disease.
Source: Epidemiology - Category: Epidemiology Tags: Cardiovascular Disease Source Type: research
Hypertension affects approximately 85 million Americans, or almost 1 in 3 adults. Black men have disproportionately higher rates of hypertension and are more likely to experience complications of hypertension, including stroke, myocardial infarction, and death. In addition, hypertensive black men are less likely to achieve optimal blood pressure (BP) than women and persons of other races. In light of this, we performed a literature search for articles published from January 1, 1966, to December 31, 2018, using terms including hypertension, blood pressure, black male, and African American male.
Source: Mayo Clinic Proceedings - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
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