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Housecall: Seasonal affective disorder

THIS WEEK'S TOP STORIES Seasonal affective disorder If the shorter days are leaving you moody and less energized, it could be seasonal affective disorder ? a type of depression related to changes in seasons. Here are the facts. Mindfulness exercises Stressed out by the election or upcoming holidays? Mindfulness exercises, a form of meditation, can [...]
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

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Depression and Anxiety, EarlyView.
Source: Depression and Anxiety - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Source Type: research
The use of light for its antidepressant action dates back to the beginnings of civilization. As early as 4700 years ago, Wong Tai mentioned the fluctuation of diseases with seasons, Hippocrates wrote on the interrelation between seasonal climates and mood (melancholia and mania) [1], and Aretaeus of Cappadocia prescribed, in the second century AD, that “Lethargics be laid in the light, and exposed to the rays of the sun, for the disease is gloom”. While being reported for millennia, bright light therapy (BLT) in depression was not officially recognized until 30 years ago for treating the Seasonal Affective Diso...
Source: Sleep Medicine Reviews - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research
Abstract Seasonal affective disorder (SAD), beyond mood changes, is characterized by alterations in daily rhythms of behavior and physiology. The pathophysiological conditions of SAD involve changes in day length and its first-line treatment is bright light therapy. Animal models using nocturnal rodents have been studied to elucidate the neurobiological mechanisms of depression, but might be ill suited to study the therapeutic effects of light in SAD since they exhibit light-aversive responses. Here Arvicanthis ansorgei, a diurnal rodent, was used to determine behavioral, molecular and brain dopamine changes in re...
Source: Brain Structure and Function - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Brain Struct Funct Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: There is very low-quality evidence based on two CBA studies that high CCT light may improve alertness, but not mood, in daytime workers. There is very low-quality evidence based on one CBA study that high CCT light may also cause less irritability, eye discomfort and headache than standard illumination. There is low-quality evidence based on one RCT that different proportions of direct and indirect light in the workplace do not affect alertness or mood. There is very low-quality evidence based on one RCT that individually applied blue-enriched light improves both alertness and mood. There is low-quality eviden...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
The personality traits Neuroticism and Extraversion may be involved in the development of seasonal affective disorder (SAD). However, the impact of personality traits on SAD severity and whether such self-reported traits fluctuate with season is unknown. We investigated the association between Neuroticism, as acquired in a symptom-free phase and depression severity in individuals with SAD and seasonal changes in personality traits in individuals with SAD compared to healthy controls. Twenty-nine individuals diagnosed with SAD and thirty demographically matched controls completed the NEO Personality Inventory-Revised and th...
Source: Psychiatry Research - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Source Type: research
Our society tends to dismiss seasonal affective disorder (SAD). We minimize it. We misunderstand it. Oh, you just don’t like winter. And who could blame you? Winter is tough on everyone. Oh, SAD is like the winter blues, right? You get grumpy or moody because you hate the freezing cold. You’re just in a funk. It happens to a lot of people. It’s totally normal. How can you feel depressed when the air is so crisp and it’s a winter wonderland out there? We incorporate SAD into our vocabulary, flippantly using it in conversation. “Similar to someone saying “I can’t make up my mind, it...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Depression Disorders General Seasonal Affective Disorder Stigma Light therapy Mental Health Stigma phototherapy SAD summer depression summertime depression winter depression wintertime depression Source Type: news
Authors: Altunsoy N, Yüksel RN, Cingi Yirun M, Kılıçarslan A, Aydemir Ç Abstract BACKGROUND: Several studies suggest an association between hypovitaminosis D and mood disorders including major depressive disorder, seasonal affective disorder and premenstrual dysphoric disorder. On the other hand, there is not enough study about acute manic episode and hypovitaminosis D. This data insufficient zone led us to study on whether vitamin D deficiency is associated with acute manic episode and has an impact on disease activity Methods: Thirty-one patients with bipolar disorder in remission, 26 patient...
Source: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Nord J Psychiatry Source Type: research
Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is characterized by seasonally recurring depression. Heightened amygdala activation to aversive stimuli is associated with major depressive disorder but its relation to SAD is unclear. We evaluated seasonal variation in amygdala activation in SAD and healthy controls (HC) using a longitudinal design targeting the asymptomatic/symptomatic phases of SAD. We hypothesized increased amygdala activation to aversive stimuli in the winter in SAD individuals (season-by-group interaction).
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Research paper Source Type: research
Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is a type of depression that comes and goes with the seasons, typically starting in the late fall and early winter and going away during the spring and summer. To be diagnosed with SAD, people must meet full criteria for major depression coinciding with specific seasons (appearing in the winter or summer months) for at least 2 years. Symptoms of the winter pattern of SAD include having low energy, hypersomnia, overeating, weight gain, craving for carbohydrates, social withdrawal (feel like “hibernating”).
Source: NCCAM Featured Content - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Source Type: news
Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), a type of depression that comes and goes with the seasons, typically starts in the late fall and early winter and goes away during the spring and summer. Depressive episodes linked to the summer can occur, but are much less common than winter episodes of SAD. To be diagnosed with SAD, people must meet full criteria for major depression coinciding with specific seasons for at least 2 years. Some of the symptoms of the winter pattern of SAD include having low energy, overeating, craving carbohydrates, and social withdrawal.
Source: NCCAM Featured Content - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Source Type: news
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