Wertheimer Remembrance: The challenge of shared decision making between physicians and patients

In Remembrance of Alan Wertheimer, PhD, the CC Department of Bioethics Presents the First Annual Widening the Lens Lecture Alan Wertheimer's contributions to bioethics were far reaching and invaluable. After a very successful career in Political Science at the University of Vermont, Alan embraced bioethics with intellectual curiosity and acumen, often challenging prevailing views and urging broader thinking. He practiced a fruitful method - Widening the Lens (reflected in the title of this lecture and the subtitle of his last book), challenging all of us to consider why the norms and principles that guide our thinking about bioethics, particularly research ethics, should be different from other social contexts. Alan was an integral member of the NIH CC Department of Bioethics from 2005 until 2015, and his work produced fresh insights that shook up the conventional wisdom. In honor of Alan and his many contributions, the Department of Bioethics is hosting an annual Widening the Lens lecture, featuring a speaker whose work also serves to expand our perspectives and understanding of complex issues. Critical Decisions: The challenge of shared decision making between physicians and patients. Guest Speaker: Peter Ubel, MD, Duke University In 1974, Betty Ford went to sleep so that her doctors could biopsy a lump they had seen on her mammogram. She woke up in a hospital room with a huge bandage over her chest. They hadn't removed a tiny lump. They'd removed her entire breast, with...
Source: Videocast - All Events - Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

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Our panel this morning discussed the issues surrounding how the WHI results were interpreted and communicated to women and their health care providers. We recognize that hormones are not appropriate for all women, and look forward to hosting a future panel that highlights alternatives. The speakers have a variety of backgrounds and experiences (and genders), and we aim to promote diversity of voices. This was not normal breakfast conversation. Today was a jolting – and disruptive – talk about what happens to women’s bodies when they age. (Who knew that if you’re menopausal and you don’t take y...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
By ANISH KOKA, MD No one knows who Bennie Solis is anymore. He had the misfortune of being born in the early 1960s marked for death. He had a rare peculiar condition called biliary atresia – a disease defined by the absence of a conduit for bile to travel from his liver to his intestinal tract. Bile acid produced in the liver normally travels to the intestines much like water from a spring travels via ever larger channels to eventually empty into the ocean. Bile produced in the liver with no where to go dams up in the liver and starts to destroy it. That the liver is a hardy organ was a fact known to the ancient Gree...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
Author Affiliations open 1Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA 2Social &Scientific Systems, Inc., Durham, North Carolina, USA 3Westat, Durham, North Carolina, USA 4Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway 5Biostatistics and Computational Biology Branch, NIEHS, NIH, DHHS, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA PDF Version (548 KB) Abstract About This Article Supplemental Material Bac...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
In readinglast year's RSNA report, I was struck with just how little has changed.Here I am this year, 2017, and here's how I looked at RSNA 2016:A little grayer, perhaps a pound or two more. But otherwise same ol'Dalai. And same ol'RSNA. I even manned the RAD-AID booth again:Yes, I tied the bow-tie all by myself.This is a model housed at the Bayer booth of the airship RAD-AID hopes to use to bring imaging to underserved areas; I think the official rendering is much more impressive, and maybe even a little, well,buxom:I'm still lobbying for a seat on the first flight. Did I saybuxom? I meanthandsome!I did attend the requisi...
Source: Dalai's PACS Blog - Category: Radiology Source Type: blogs
Each year, MD+DI’s editors gather to choose which company should be named the Medtech Company of the Year, and it’s always a heated debate. This year, we named nine finalists, but the decision to crown Abbott as our 2017 Medtech Company of the Year was unanimous. Our readers, however, had a different opinion. While MD+DI’s editors chose Abbott for its ability to rise above challenges, Bigfoot Biomedical was the favorite among our readership. The Milpitas, CA-based firm is amalgamating other companies’ hardware plus its own software and algorithms to craft an artificial pancreas for patients with dia...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Business Source Type: news
Conclusions: Although further work is required to confirm our results and to clarify potential mechanisms, our findings suggest that exposure to residential outdoor light at night may contribute to invasive breast cancer risk. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP935 Received: 08 August 2016 Revised: 17 March 2017 Accepted: 20 March 2017 Published: 17 August 2017 Address correspondence to P. James, 401 Park Dr., 3rd Floor West, Boston, MA 02215 USA. Telephone: (617) 525-2567; Email: pjames@hsph.harvard.edu Supplemental Material is available online (https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP935). The authors declare they have no actual or pot...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
I don’t read many books on health. A while back, however, I came across The Truth About Cancer and decided to read it. I was interested in it because cancer is one of the top killers in the modern age. More personally, my mom passed away because of cancer. I also have two friends who passed away because of cancer at the young age of 32 and 33. I’m glad I read the book. Honestly, the content of the book is not what I expected. I expected a positive attitude toward popular cancer treatments like chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. But the book is actually against them. It’s eye-opening for me. You might w...
Source: Life Optimizer - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Source Type: blogs
In Stories of Hope, we regularly publish the stories of people who have a positive message to share, whether their cancer diagnosis was just recently, or long ago. Our featured survivors share words of inspiration, wisdom, hope, and support in these stories about how their lives have been changed by cancer. Our editors have chosen 10 of the most inspirational stories of 2016. For many who are facing a cancer diagnosis, or any other illness or hardship, hearing from others who've been through one already can be a great source of comfort and support. We hope you will find inspiration in these stories of cancer survivors. &nb...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Coping with Cancer Source Type: news
DISCUSSION all over RSNA was Artificial Intelligence, and in particular, AI as applied to Radiology. Well, let's be even more specific. There was a cloud (pun intended) hanging over McCormick, the specter of RSNA Yet To Come, which I quite presciently predicted in my 2011RSNA Christmas Carol:I sat down on a PET/CT gantry and bowed my head. The room spun, and when I looked up again, we were seated on a bench beside Lake Michigan. It was a blustery day, with winds one only sees in Chicago in the winter. Strangely, I felt no chill, as I watched leaves blowing through the PACSman's shadowy figure.I looked behind me and gasped....
Source: Dalai's PACS Blog - Category: Radiology Source Type: blogs
Treatment TermsLung cancer screening CategoriesFamily health SEO Keywordsduke cancer center SEO Meta Description The earlier lung cancer is found, the easier it is to treat. Overview Ronald Knowles was smoking two to three packs of cigarettes a day and coping with COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) when he went for his first appointment at Duke Primary Care. The avid biker may not have known it, but his 50-year smoking habit and lung disease put him at high risk for lung cancer. Hero Imagelung_cancer_screening_patient.jpg Preview Image Content Blocks ContentPhysician assistantLeanne Owens knew it, ...
Source: dukehealth.org: Health Features - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Source Type: news
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