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Research reveals biological mechanism of a leading cause of childhood blindness
(Virginia Tech) Scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute (VTCRI) have revealed the pathology of cells and structures stricken by optic nerve hypoplasia, a leading cause of childhood blindness in developed nations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Virginia Tech researchers explore causes of land cover change in African savannas
(Virginia Tech) Elephants are often blamed for extensive loss of woody vegetation in Northern Botswana, but study results suggest that this may not be the case. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 8, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Former Mach37 partner joins Inova's personalized medicine accelerator
Inova Health System is bringing Northern Virginia tech investor Rick Gordon into the fold. The former executive from Herndon-based cybersecurity accelerator Mach37 will serve as a director of the Inova Personalized Health Accelerator. Gordon led investments in 46 companies as a founding managing partner at the accelerator. He was ousted from Mach37 in July as part of what parent organ ization the Center for Innovative Technology called a “modification to the management structure.” My colleague… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - October 18, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Tina Reed Source Type: news

Even small amounts of oil made birds near Deepwater Horizon sick, researchers say
(Virginia Tech) Blood samples taken by first responders showed that individuals exposed to small amounts of oil from the spill suffered from hemolytic anemia--a condition that occurs when toxins enter the blood stream and damage red blood cells that carry oxygen to tissues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Declining baby songbirds need forests to survive drought
(Virginia Tech) A team of Smithsonian biologists led by Brandt Ryder worked closely with Ben Vernasco, a doctoral candidate in biology at Virginia Tech, on a study that aimed to identify characteristics that promote healthy wood thrush populations on US Department of Defense land. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

WATCH: Study sheds light on youth football head hits
Researchers at Virginia Tech found that quarterbacks, running backs and linebackers all experienced high-magnitude head impacts. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - October 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GMA Source Type: news

WATCH: Study sheds new light on youth football head hits
Researchers at Virginia Tech found that quarterbacks, running backs and linebackers all experienced high-magnitude head impacts. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - October 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GMA Source Type: news

Global Change Center researchers to forecast water quality with NSF support
(Virginia Tech) The team -- which includes ecologists, social scientists, geologists and engineers -- was awarded a $1 million National Science Foundation Smart and Connected Communities grant to develop a system that can create a real-time water forecast -- similar to a weather forecast -- for Falling Creek Reservoir in Roanoke, Va. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 12, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The 10 Deadliest Mass Shootings in Modern U.S. History
With 59 people killed, Sunday night’s mass shooting in Las Vegas marked the deadliest in modern U.S. history — and the death count is more likely to rise. Shooter Stephen Backer’s rampage at the Route 91 Harvest Festival outside the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino was not the deadliest shooting in U.S. history. That unfortunate title goes to the 1890 Wounded Knee Massacre left more 200 Native Americans dead. But it’s the deadliest of the modern era. As mass shootings seemingly become more common, here are the ten deadliest shootings in modern U.S. history. 1. Las Vegas Shooting — At least 59 de...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lisa Marie Segarra Tags: Uncategorized Crime onetime tragedy Source Type: news

Why Are There So Many Conflicting Numbers on Mass Shootings?
No one would argue over whether the horrific massacre at a Las Vegas concert on Sunday, which claimed the lives of 58 people and injured over 500 more, fits the definition of a mass shooting. Nor does anyone quibble over that classification for the Orlando nightclub shooting that killed 49 and injured 53, or Sandy Hook, or Virginia Tech, or any of the other outbursts of gun violence that have claimed hundreds of lives in past decade alone. But what about the Plano, Texas man who fatally shot his estranged wife and seven other people at a private party just last week? Or the 25-year-old man who opened fire during a church s...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Chris Wilson Tags: Uncategorized Gun Violence interactive studios las vegas shooting Mass Shooting Source Type: news

The Las Vegas Shooting Is the Deadliest in Modern U.S. History
At least 50 people were killed and more than 200 were injured in a mass shooting at a Las Vegas music festival Sunday night, marking the deadliest shooting in modern U.S. history. The numbers could fluctuate as the day goes on. The shooter, who has been named as 64-year-old Stephen Paddock, opened fire on the Route 91 Harvest Festival from the 32nd floor of the nearby Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino at 10:08 p.m, authorities say. Country singer Jason Aldean was playing on stage at the time. Paddock is now dead after an encounter with authorities. The Las Vegas shooting is now deadlier than last year’s attack on the Pu...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lucinda Shen Tags: Uncategorized Crime Mass Shooting Nevada onetime Source Type: news

Virginia Tech study finds that healthy bacteria in yogurt may reduce lupus symptoms in mice
(Virginia Tech) Researchers at the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech have released findings that explain how a type of healthy bacteria in yogurt and other dairy products might reduce disease symptoms in certain patients with lupus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study highlights conservation needs of fish species recently discovered in Southwest Virginia
(Virginia Tech) Currently, the Clinch dace is in the highest tier of the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries' Tiers of Imperilment for all wildlife species found in the state. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 2, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Colleges Are an ‘Echo Chamber of Political Correctness.’ Read Jeff Sessions’ Speech on Campus Free Speech
Attorney General Jeff Sessions said Tuesday that freedom of speech is under attack on college campuses in America. During a speech at Georgetown Law School, Sessions said political correctness has transformed academic spaces “into an echo chamber of political correctness and homogeneous thought.” He cited the cancelling of speaking events due to fear of protests as an example, referring to such incidents as a “heckler’s veto.” “This is not right,” he said. “This is not in the great tradition of America. And, yet, school administrators bend to this behavior. In effect, they co...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lisa Marie Segarra Tags: Uncategorized Education Jeff Sessions justice onetime Source Type: news

Scientists restore tumor-fighting structure to mutated breast cancer proteins
(Virginia Tech) Scientists have revealed the architecture of the breast cancer susceptibility protein (BRCA1) for the first time. The finding may provide answers toward restoring the protein's cancer-fighting ability. Triple negative breast cancer is often linked to inherited mutations in the BRCA1 gene. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 20, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Why did Ford build a 'fake driverless car' using a man dressed as a seat?
The researchers behind the illusion, which went viral last month, explain how the plan was actually to see how people react to self-driving vehiclesIn early August residents of Arlington, Virginia, spotted an unmarked silver Ford Transit van cruising around town without a human behind the wheel.Local news publicationARLnow caught the ghostly vehicle on camera and speculated that it was part of Virginia Tech ’s autonomous driving research. A couple of days later, NBC reporter Adam Tuss approached the vehicle on foot and peered inside, only to see hands poking out from the driver’s seat holding the steering wheel...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 15, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Olivia Solon in San Francisco Tags: Self-driving cars Technology Ford Automotive industry US news Business Psychology Source Type: news

Trump Should Eliminate Fake Science
(Natural News) “What Lies Upstream” is a documentary by Hyrax Films that includes interviews with Professor Marc Edwards at Virginia Tech and me about data fabrication by the EPA and CDC. A review by IndieWire highlights comments Director Cullen Hoback made in which he stressed “the alarming implications for the future of science and reason... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Virginia Tech biochemists dip into the health benefits of olives and olive oil
(Virginia Tech) Virginia Tech research team discovered that the olive-derived compound oleuropein helps prevent type 2 diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Viral Networks: An Advanced Workshop in Digital Humanities and Medical History
Join the National Library of Medicine, supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) through a grant to Virginia Tech, for this exciting opportunity! On January 29-30, 2018, NLM will host Viral Networks: An Advanced Workshop in Digital Humanities and Medical History, bringing together scholars from various fields of medical history whose innovative research shows promise through the use of methods, tools, and data from the digital humanities. Viral Networks will combine a face-to-face workshop with structured virtual-editing activities to produce and advance the innovative scholarship of the participant...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - September 11, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Data Science Education News from NLM/NIH Technology Source Type: news

NLM to Host Viral Networks: An Advanced Workshop in Digital Humanities and Medical History
On January 29-30, 2018, NLM will host Viral Networks: An Advanced Workshop in Digital Humanities and Medical History, bringing together scholars from various fields of medical history whose innovative research shows promise through the use of methods, tools, and data from the digital humanities. The event will be supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) through a grant to Virginia Tech, and is a collaborative outcome of NLM's ongoing partnership with the NEH. (Source: NLM General Announcements)
Source: NLM General Announcements - September 6, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Federal snack program does not yield expected impacts, Virginia Tech researchers find
(Virginia Tech) The research team examined the US Department of Agriculture's Smart Snacks in School regulation. The federal mandate was intended to replace unhealthy school snacks and beverages with more wholesome options, including fruits, vegetables, and packaged treats low in fat, sugar, and sodium. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Camera-trap research paves the way for global monitoring networks
(Virginia Tech) In recent years, there have been numerous calls for coordinated global monitoring networks to understand and mitigate the effects of ecosystem change and biodiversity loss around the world. A new study led by Lindsey Rich, who recently completed her doctorate in wildlife conservation in Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment, demonstrates that camera traps are one of the most effective methods of collecting this type of data. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 29, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Child safety or parental duty: New study maps out core concepts in the vaccination debate
(Virginia Tech) 'A single phrase can conjure up completely different images in our minds, depending on how that concept is organized in our mental models,' said Samarth Swarup, a research assistant professor at Virginia Tech. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research finds common household chemicals lead to birth defects in mice
(Virginia Tech) A new study at the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine (VCOM) and the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech has found a connection between common household chemicals and birth defects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 16, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Who to vaccinate when flu season strikes
(PLOS) Immunizing children and the elderly, after the high-risk individuals, will have the greatest overall benefit when there are limited vaccine resources, saving both lives and money, according to a study published in PLOS Computational Biology by Nargesalsadat Dorratoltaj of the Department of Population Health Sciences, Virginia Tech, and colleagues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 1, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Regenerative medicine researcher's startup companies give hope to patients
(Virginia Tech) Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute scientist takes commercial route to develop new treatments for wound healing and cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 24, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Howard Hughes Medical Institute research award a first for Virginia Tech Carilion
(Virginia Tech) A Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine has been awarded a highly competitive Howard Hughes Medical Institute fellowship to devote a year to in-depth, mentored biomedical research at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 26, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Early career scientist receives recognition from Microscopy Society of America
(Virginia Tech) Rengasayee 'Sai' Veeraraghavan, a research assistant professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, became the sixth person in the world to receive the George Palade Award from the Microscopy Society of America. Veeraragahavan began using a new imaging technology called STochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM), which earned the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, to study proteins in the narrow space between heart cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 24, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Americans Would Pay $17.2 Billion To Prevent Another Deepwater Horizon Disaster
As the world looks back on BP’s Deepwater Horizon disaster seven years later, a study released this week highlights the costly ecological impacts of the largest maritime oil spill on record. Scientists found that Americans would be willing to pay an estimated $17.2 billion to prevent another catastrophe like the BP oil spill, which leaked more than 134 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration commissioned the study, which offers the first comprehensive appraisal of the disaster’s financial impact on affected natural resources, like bea...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Americans Would Pay $17.2 Billion To Prevent Another Deepwater Horizon Disaster
As the world looks back on BP’s Deepwater Horizon disaster seven years later, a study released this week highlights the costly ecological impacts of the largest maritime oil spill on record. Scientists found that Americans would be willing to pay an estimated $17.2 billion to prevent another catastrophe like the BP oil spill, which leaked more than 134 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration commissioned the study, which offers the first comprehensive appraisal of the disaster’s financial impact on affected natural resources, like bea...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 22, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Facebook plays vital role in reducing government corruption, researchers find
(Virginia Tech) In new research, Sudipta Sarangi of the Virginia Tech Department of Economics, analyzed data from more than 150 countries, showing the more Facebook penetrates public usage, the higher the likelihood of government corruption meeting protest. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 21, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Flint water crisis likely the cause of deadly Legionnaires outbreak
Virginia Tech Professor Marc Edwards released to CNN the unpublished results of a study that show the Flint water crisis most likely caused the deadly outbreak of Legionnaires disease that killed at least 12 people since 2014. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - March 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

We're One Step Closer To Brain Scans That Can Reveal Criminal Intent
What if lawyers could prove that a person knowingly committed a crime by looking at scans of his or her brain? It sounds like something from a science fiction story, but a new study suggests that we may be one step closer to this reality. In the study, researchers analyzed brain scans and were able to pinpoint patterns of brain activity that predicted whether people committed certain acts “knowingly,” meaning that they knew without a doubt that they were committing a crime; or merely “recklessly,” meaning that they were not certain that they were committing a crime. And although much more research i...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

House Passes Bill To Help Vets With Mental Illness Buy Guns
WASHINGTON ― The House of Representatives passed a bill Thursday to allow thousands of veterans who are disabled or have mental health conditions to buy guns. Under a law signed by President George W. Bush in the wake of a mass shooting at Virginia Tech in 2007, federal agencies such as the Veterans Administration were required to add the names of people deemed “mentally defective” to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, or NICS, to block them from buying weapons. The VA defined such individuals as those who receive monetary benefits, and have a fiduciary because they lack “the mental ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mind-reading AI knows whether you are guilty or innocent
Scientists at Virginia Tech have created an AI brain scanning system which can predict whether volunteers knowingly carried drugs during a simulated border smuggling operation. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How red wine could slow down ageing
Resveratrol, which exists in the skin of red grapes and gives the fruit its colour, could stop brain cells from breaking down as we get older, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute scientists claim. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Substance found in red wine 'helps fight ageing'
Conclusion Resveratrol has been of interest to anti-ageing scientists for many years and researchers have previously shown it may be linked to a slowing of the decline in thinking and movement, at least in rodents. This study suggests a possible way this might happen. But the results don't tell us anything about what happens in humans. They suggest this substance may be useful for further research in humans at some point. They certainly don't provide a reason to drink gallons of red wine, in the hope of seeing an anti-ageing effect. Drinking too much alcohol is a sure-fire way to speed up deterioration of thinking skills,...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Lifestyle/exercise Neurology Source Type: news

Virginia Tech team examines molecular-level problems of heart disease
(Virginia Tech) In a recent study, Virginia Tech researchers teamed up with cardiologists and heart therapy scientists from across the US and Europe and found that dysfunction at the molecular level is present in heart failure. Understanding this abnormality could lead to new approaches for treating the No. 1. killer among men and women worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 7, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

UVA, Virginia Tech seek ways to assist drivers with autism
(University of Virginia Health System) The University of Virginia is teaming up with Virginia Tech to study novice drivers with autism to determine if they would benefit from specialized training to help them become better, safer drivers and feel more comfortable behind the wheel. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 1, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Researchers discover how breast cancer mutation in BRCA1 causes protein to self-destruct
(Virginia Tech) Scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute found that breast cancer cells can trigger the self-destruction of the tumor-suppressing BRCA1 proteins. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 28, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Why a District firm has teamed up with Virginia Tech to transform Roanoke
A D.C. investment firm has teamed up with Virginia Tech and a large health care provider to revitalize the city of Roanoke, a move it hopes will bring new life science and tech startups to southwest Virginia. Middleland Capital, which invests in early-stage companies on behalf of Columbia Capital co-founder David Mixer, will invest in and manage the $15 million VTC Innovation Fund. Virginia Tech and health care provider Carilion Clinic, the two largest employers in that region, also are partners. The… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 27, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Andy Medici Source Type: news

Colorado School of Mines and Virginia Tech to create minerals industry consortium
(Colorado School of Mines) Colorado School of Mines is teaming with Virginia Tech to develop an integrated approach to locating, characterizing and visualizing mineral resources. The goal is to advance mining operations and boost exploration success rates while minimizing financial risk and environmental impact.The proposed Center for Advanced Subsurface Earth Resource Models would provide exploration and mining companies worldwide with new 3-D subsurface geological models, informing decision-making and risk management at all stages of the mining life cycle. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 23, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Should Scientists Engage In Activism?
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 7, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Should Scientists Engage In Activism?
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Academic Health Department Learning Community Meeting - March 2017
March 7, 2017 1-2pm ET. Speaker will discuss the New River Academic Health Department, which is a partnership of the New River Health District and Virginia Tech's Department of Population Health Sciences. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - February 7, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Drug discovery researchers awarded grant to refine malaria drug
(Virginia Tech) A research team from the Virginia Tech Center for Drug Discovery has received a $431,126 two-year grant from the National Institutes of Health to make improved versions of a promising compound called MMV008138, or 8138 for short. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 2, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers help the body protect itself against inflammation and colon cancer
(Virginia Tech) Virginia Tech researchers found that modifying the shape of IRAK-M, a protein that controls inflammation, can significantly reduce the clinical progression of both diseases in pre-clinical animal models. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 27, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Witnessing fear in others can physically change brain, scientists say
(Virginia Tech) Scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have discovered that observing fear in others may change how information flows in the brain. The finding in a rodent model may have bearing on people who suffer post-traumatic stress disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 4, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Why Do People Get Colds in Cold Weather?
Why do people get colds in cold weather? originally appeared on Quora: the knowledge sharing network where compelling questions are answered by people with unique insights. Answer by Keck Medicine of USC, 500+ internationally renowned doctors at a leading academic medical center, on Quora: It's common knowledge we are all more likely to get sick during winter. But what does science have to say about why? You're outside on an unexpectedly chilly day. You forgot to wear your hat and gloves and now you're shivering. Is it a given that you're going to catch a cold or come down with the flu? Maybe. Cold weather doesn't make ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists zero in on biological diversity in 'poor man's rainforest'
(Virginia Tech) Leftover DNA from dead organisms -- known as 'relic DNA' -- has historically thrown a wrench into estimates, causing scientists to overestimate microbial diversity by as much as 55 percent. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 20, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news