NSF funds research predicting gene mutations via computational algorithms
(Virginia Tech) Virginia Tech and Colorado State University researchers have been awarded a $1.52 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to develop new algorithms and mathematical models with the goal of predicting the effects of novel combinations of gene mutations in living cells. They will apply this computational framework to models of cell growth and division in budding yeast. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 16, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists solve century-old neuroscience mystery; answers may lead to epilepsy treatment
(Virginia Tech) Scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have solved a 125-year-old mystery of the brain, and, in the process, uncovered a potential treatment for acquired epilepsy. Perineuronal nets modulate electrical impulses in the brain, and, should the nets dissolve, brain seizures can occur. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Flood dynamics increase population vulnerability to waterborne disease and climate
(Virginia Tech) They discovered that increases in diarrheal disease cases were closely tied to periods of rainfall, flood recession, and changes in surface water quality, with a 1 meter drop in river height in the dry season associated with a staggering 16.7 percent increase in diarrheal disease in children under 5. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 8, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Water experts to study emerging threat of antibiotic resistance
(Virginia Tech) The CDC recently awarded two contracts to study antibiotic resistance in recycled water and in plumbing to Amy Pruden and Marc Edwards, both professors in the Charles Edward Via, Jr. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 6, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Can brain injuries result in epilepsy development, a new study
(Virginia Tech) Virginia Tech is heading a three-year study to identify root causes behind why a person may develop epilepsy after suffering brain trauma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Roanoke-based Virginia Tech graduate student selected as a Society for Neuroscience fellow
(Virginia Tech) Ubadah Sabbagh, a doctoral student in Virginia Tech's Translational Biology, Medicine, and Health (TBMH) Graduate Program, was one of 15 graduate students and postdoctoral researchers named as a Society for Neuroscience fellow this year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study buckles down on child car seat use in ride-share vehicles
(Virginia Tech) The average Uber or Lyft vehicle does not generally come equipped with a car seat, and only in certain cities is it an option to request one. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research sheds light on conspiracy theory elements
(Virginia Tech) 'Our study also suggests that alternative media spreading conspiracy theories appear to better align with anti- and pro-globalism than with left- and right-leaning political ideologies.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hurricane Katrina's linguistic transformation on New Orleanians
(Virginia Tech) In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Carmichael's research has focused on understanding the deeper linguistic changes that occurred because of the storm. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Virtual reality brings dog's anatomy to life for veterinary students
(Virginia Tech) So she walked across the room and slipped on a virtual reality (VR) headset. Suddenly, she could see a large picture of a dog's lungs and skeletal structure floating in mid-air in front of her. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers study eastern hellbender salamanders parental habits
(Virginia Tech) This two-foot long salamander, found in cold, rocky, fast-moving rivers and streams in the Appalachian region, is one of the largest and most fascinating amphibians in the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Understanding water's role in antibiotic resistance emergence and dissemination in Africa
(Virginia Tech) Greater access to antibiotic drugs, together with their misuse and overuse, has accelerated the emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria worldwide. A new study now suggests that surface water dynamics are a crucial contributor to this growing global health concern. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Veterinary college researcher awarded grant to study herpes simplex virus
(Virginia Tech) HSV1 and HSV2 are highly contagious and incurable. The viruses establish latency in sensory and autonomic neurons (nerve cells), from which they can reactivate to cause recurrent disease, affecting more than 250 million people in the U.S. alone, according to Bertke. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Virginia Tech students benefit from new US technology
Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine in Roanoke has debuted ultrasound...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Butterfly Network raises $250M Handheld ultrasound + CADx helps triage breast masses Konica Minolta launches portable musculoskeletal US POCUS helps handle out-of-hospital cardiac arrest Portable US helps detect lung fluid in kidney patients (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - October 9, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

World's first passive anti-frosting surface fights ice with ice
(Virginia Tech) Researchers see immediate applications for the technology in the HVAC industry. Other applications include aerospace materials, like airplane wings. And with a little more development, car windshields are also an option for the anti-frosting technology, which has already been granted a full patent. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

VTCRI research team identifies a potential strategy in fight against brain cancer
(Virginia Tech) Scientists with the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute say a gene involved in the body's circadian rhythms is a potential target for therapies to help patients with a deadly form of brain cancer known as glioblastoma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The spark of connection: Scientist awarded new grant to study cardiac conduction
(Virginia Tech) Steven Poelzing, an associate professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, earned another grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to study how electrical conduction could be targeted as a treatment in cardiac diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Virginia Tech researcher to study the effects of drying streams
(Virginia Tech) 'The ecological significance of intermittent streams, which are controlled by large-scale climate fluctuations and colonized by aquatic life under wet conditions, will likely grow as the global environment changes and human demand for water increases.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 6, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

30 Under 30 winner: Jeb Dunkelberger, Highmark Inc.
Jeb Dunkelberger is director of reimbursement, strategy and innovation at Highmark Inc. and a winner of the Pittsburgh Business Times' 30 Under 30 award program. Here's some fast facts about Dunkelberger: Age: 29 Birthplace: Wilmington, Delaware Current residence: Downtown Pittsburgh Education: B.S., human nutrition, foods and exercise, Virginia Tech; M.S., health policy, planning, and financing, London School of Economics& Political Science; master ’s, health care leadership and facilities… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 2, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Richard Cerilli Source Type: news

30 Under 30 winner: Jeb Dunkelberger, Highmark Inc.
Jeb Dunkelberger is director of reimbursement, strategy and innovation at Highmark Inc. and a winner of the Pittsburgh Business Times' 30 Under 30 award program. Here's some fast facts about Dunkelberger: Age: 29 Birthplace: Wilmington, Delaware Current residence: Downtown Pittsburgh Education: B.S., human nutrition, foods and exercise, Virginia Tech; M.S., health policy, planning, and financing, London School of Economics& Political Science; master ’s, health care leadership and facilities… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 2, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Richard Cerilli Source Type: news

New Brain Cancer Treatment For Dogs Could Someday Help Humans
BLACKSBURG, Va. (CBS Local/CBS News) – Sen. John McCain died Saturday after a year-long battle with glioblastoma, the deadliest form of brain cancer. It is rare, with only about 20,000 cases in the U.S. each year. It’s the same type of aggressive cancer that claimed the life of his Senate colleague and friend Ted Kennedy in 2009. Glioblastoma can be very difficult to treat and a cure it is often not possible. Researchers are working on developing new treatment options and one regimen is currently being tested on dogs with a canine version of the cancer. Researchers at the Virginia-Maryl...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Brain Cancer Cancer Treatment Dogs John McCain Local TV talkers Source Type: news

Canine cancer drug could lead to cure for late John McCain's tumor
A team of scientists, veterinarians and doctors at Wake Forest and Virginia Tech have developed a promising treatment for glioblastomas in dogs with NIH funding - and it could help humans. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Students more likely to eat school breakfast when given extra time, new study finds
(Virginia Tech) Using food weighting stations, the researchers collected information on the number of students who ate a school breakfast, how much they ate, and their exact nutritional intake. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Checking emails after work damages your health, your relationships
Employees surveyed by Virginia Tech all had levels of anxiety that could be damaging to their health. But few realized how severe it was - and none gauged that it left their partners stressed, too. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mere expectation of checking work email after hours harms health of workers and families
(Virginia Tech) The study demonstrates that employees do not need to spend actual time on work in their off-hours to experience harmful effects. The mere expectations of availability increase strain for employees and their significant others -- even when employees do not engage in actual work during nonwork time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

24/7 work emails impact health, relationships for employees and significant others
(Lehigh University) Personal relationships and home life suffer for those tied to their work emails round-the-clock, according to a new study. The study is the first to test the relationship between organizational expectations to monitor work-related electronic communication during non-work hours and the health and relationship satisfaction of employees and their significant others. The study is co-authored by researchers at Lehigh University, Virginia Tech and Colorado State University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fulbright fellowship to fund study on mental health benefits of cooperative movement
(Virginia Tech) Brennan Delattre, a lab manager and research assistant at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, was awarded a Fulbright fellowship for the 2018-2019 academic year. The prestigious fellowship will fund research on the mental health benefits of cooperative movement in Niter ó i, Brazil. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heart association to support grad student's research into sudden cardiac death
(Virginia Tech) The American Heart Association awarded Patrick Calhoun, a biological sciences graduate student, a predoctoral fellowship to carry out his dissertation research at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute in the laboratory of James Smyth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rethinking ketchup packets: New approach to slippery packaging aims to cut food waste
(Virginia Tech) New research from Virginia Tech aims to cut down on waste -- and consumer frustration -- with a novel approach to creating super slippery industrial packaging. The study, which has yielded a provisional patent, establishes a method for wicking chemically compatible vegetable oils into the surfaces of common extruded plastics, like those used for ketchup packets and other condiments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 3, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study identifies possible treatment target for Alzheimer's, age-related cognitive decline
(Virginia Tech) The study, published this week in Nature, demonstrated that meningeal lymphatic vessels in the brain play an essential role in maintaining a healthy homeostasis in aging brains and could be a new target for treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Yellowstone super-volcano has a different history than previously thought
(Virginia Tech) The long-dormant Yellowstone super-volcano in the American West has a different history than previously thought, according to a new study by a Virginia Tech geoscientist. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Third-degree burns following contact with Giant Hogweed
Giant Hogweed (Heracleum mantegassianum)shutterstock.com/jps 3.5 out of 5 stars Keeping pace with the media; Giant Hogweed burns — a case series and comprehensive review. Baker BG et al. Burns 2017;43:933-938 Abstract   Earlier this month, the Richmond Times-Dispatch reported that an incoming student preparing for his freshman year at Virginia Tech suffered third-degree burns to his face and arm after he came into contact with a Giant Hogweed plant (Heracleum mantegassianum). “The top layer of skin on the left side of his face was basically gone and appeared to be like a really bad burn that had ...
Source: The Poison Review - July 24, 2018 Category: Toxicology Authors: Leon Gussow Tags: Medical burn injury dermatitis dermatology Giant hogweed Heracleum mantegassianum phytophotodermatitis skin Source Type: news

Lunatic liberals now claim fossil fuels cause "petro-masculinity" that makes men hyper-macho
(Natural News) A liberal professor of politics and global security at Virginia Tech says that the continued use of fossil fuels for energy is contributing to a concept she made up called “petro-masculinity,” which in her own words represents “a reassertion of white masculine power on an unruly planet that is perceived to be increasingly... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientist earns third concurrent National Cancer Institute grant to study breast cancer
(Virginia Tech) Deb Kelly, an associate professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, was awarded $2.1 million by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to study the protein that gives rise to a hard-to-treat form of breast cancer. This is her third concurrent R01 grant, which funds a specific line of research for five years, from the NCI of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientist awarded $2 million grant from the NIH to study the body's immune memory response
(Virginia Tech) The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded a $2 million, five-year grant to Ken Oestreich, an assistant professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, to study immunological memory. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 27, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A Giant Plant That Can Cause Blindness Was Spotted for the First Time in a New State
The presence of a hazardous invasive plant that can cause burns and blindness has been confirmed for the first time in Virginia, authorities said. The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services confirmed on Tuesday that giant hogweed, a toxic weed that can grow up to 15 feet tall and resembles the less dangerous cow parsnip, was identified at a private home in Clarke County. Earlier this month, Virginia Department of Transportation employees who remembered hearing about the species years earlier reported a bunch growing in Frederick County, the Washington Post reports. Exposure to sap produced by the giant h...
Source: TIME: Science - June 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime plants Source Type: news

Study finds less corruption in countries where more women are in government
(Virginia Tech) The new research is the most comprehensive study on this topic and looks at the implications of the presence of women in other occupations as including the shares of women in the labor force, clerical positions, and decision making positions such as the CEOs and other managerial positions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Flu virus is protected by mucus when airborne, regardless of humidity
(University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences) Mucus and other airway secretions that are expelled when a person with the flu coughs or exhales appear to protect the virus when it becomes airborne, regardless of humidity levels, a creative experiment conducted by the University of Pittsburgh and Virginia Tech discovered. The results refute long-standing studies that indicated the influenza virus degrades and is inactivated sooner as the humidity increases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Collaborative team first to identify the perinexus in the human heart
(Virginia Tech) A collaborative research team is on a quest to collapse a tiny pocket between cardiac cells that can cause big problems. Called the perinexus, the structure spans only tenths of a millimeter -- all the space it needs to disrupt a person's heartbeat. The researchers were the first to identify the perinexus in humans. They published their results this month in Frontiers in Physiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

VTCRI scientists identify novel cellular mechanism that can lead to cancer metastasis
(Virginia Tech) Scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have added a new dimension to the understanding of how cells alter their communication with one another during development, wound healing, and the spread of cancer. The researchers published their results in Molecular Biology of the Cell, a journal published by the American Society for Cell Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 29, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight NLM @ MLA 2018: Did you miss a National Library of Medicine presentation at MLA? Recordings of the NLM theater presentations are now available! The University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System (HSLS) invites applications for the position of Health Programming Coordinator for the Middle Atlantic Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM MAR). Review of applications begins June 27, 2018, and will continue until filled. The MAR offices will be closed on Monday, May 28 for Memorial Day. National N...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - May 25, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Major Depression in Males May Lower Chances of Conception
THURSDAY, May 24, 2018 -- Active major depression (MD) in the male partner may lower the likelihood of pregnancy, according to a study published in the May issue of Fertility& Sterility. Emily A. Evans-Hoeker, M.D., from Virginia Tech Carilion... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 24, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

A green approach to making ammonia could help feed the world
(University of Central Florida) A UCF research team with collaborators at Virginia Tech have developed a new 'green' approach to making ammonia that may help make feeding the rising world population more sustainable. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Keep calm and carry on: VTCRI scientists make first serotonin measurements in humans
(Virginia Tech) Scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have begun to unravel how serotonin acts, based on data collected in a first-of-its-kind experiment that utilized electrochemical probes implanted into the brain of awake human beings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

EPA gives $1.9 million to researcher to find lead in water
The EPA has awarded the Virginia Tech researcher who first identified lead in water systems in Flint, Michigan, and Washington, DC, with a $1.9 million grant to study other American cities where lead-tainted water is suspected -- but where residents are struggling to get help from their governments. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Land use and pollution shift female-to-male ratios in snapping turtles
(Virginia Tech) Current research shows that increasing global temperatures as a result of climate change are expected to produce more female turtles since their offspring are influenced by the nest's temperature. But now, a team of Virginia Tech biologists has found that the nesting environment of turtles in agricultural habitats, which can ultimately lower nesting temperatures, can actually produce more males. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

US judges should do more than simply 'apply the law' when it demands cruel sentences
(University of Surrey) Legal experts from the University of Surrey and Virginia Tech are calling for judges to seek a middle ground between the law and morality to deal with cases where 'mandatory minimum' provisions would force them to impose excessive punishments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers seek evolutionary story behind snake-like animals that use heads to burrow
(Virginia Tech) A National Science Foundation grant will help researchers map the repeated evolution of similar head shapes among animals that use their head to dig into the ground. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Personal outreach to landowners is vital to conservation program success
(Virginia Tech) Research published in PLOS ONE shows that private landowners trust conservation agencies more and have better views of program outcomes when they accompany conservation biologists who are monitoring habitat management on their land. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Human-centered design is key to forming partnerships for large-scale conservation success
(Virginia Tech) The findings, published in PLOS ONE on March 9, question previous assumptions in the field that the payments themselves are the most effective motivator of participation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news