UW researchers develop tool to equitably distribute limited vaccines
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Researchers at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and UW Health have developed a tool that incorporates a person's age and socioeconomic status to prioritize vaccine distribution among people who otherwise share similar risks due to their jobs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Population density and virus strains will affect how regions can resume normal life
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) As a new, apparently more transmissible version of the virus that causes COVID-19 has appeared in several countries, new research finds that the transmissibility of viral strains and the population density of a region will play big roles in how vaccination campaigns can help towns and cities return to more normal activities. The findings suggest that directing vaccines toward densely populated counties would help to interrupt transmission of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Covering faces around kids won't mask emotions
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) The proliferation of face coverings to keep COVID-19 in check isn't keeping kids from understanding facial expressions, according to a new study by University of Wisconsin-Madison psychologists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Community conservation reserves protect fish diversity in tropical rivers
(Cornell University) A collaboration between researchers from Cornell University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison has found that small, community-based reserves in Thailand's Salween River Basin are serving as critical refuges for fish diversity in a region whose subsistence fisheries have suffered from decades of overharvesting. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 25, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

William Reznikoff, other MBL affiliates are named fellows of the AAAS
(Marine Biological Laboratory) William S. Reznikoff, senior research scholar at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) and professor emeritus at University of Wisconsin-Madison, has been elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Reznikoff was cited for " deciphering the molecular details of transposition by studying a model bacterial transposon. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 24, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

'Rewiring' metabolism in insulin-producing cells may aid Type 2 diabetes treatment
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Researchers have discovered a previously unknown way that pancreatic cells decide how much insulin to secrete. It could provide a promising new target to develop drugs for boosting insulin production in people with Type 2 diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Covid Infections in Animals Prompt Scientific Concern
Mink in Denmark are not the only animals that could become reservoirs for the coronavirus to spread new mutations to people. (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - November 8, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: James Gorman Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Minks (Animals) Monkeys and Apes Wildlife Sanctuaries and Nature Reserves Genetics and Heredity Vaccination and Immunization Tufts University University of Calgary University of Wisconsin World Health Organization Source Type: news

‘Molecular Signature’ In Blood May Indicate Coronavirus Disease Severity
Physicians in New York teamed up with data scientists at the University of Wisconsin to analyze blood samples from over 100 Covid-19 patients. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - October 22, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Caroline Seydel, Contributor Tags: Healthcare /healthcare Innovation /innovation Science /science Editors' Pick editors-pick Coronavirus Source Type: news

Tommy Thompson pitches mask-wearing in new campaign from business, health coalition
Former Wisconsin Gov. Tommy Thompson, who recently touted the success of the University of Wisconsin System in curbing Covid-19, is the new commercial spokesman for a coalition of business and health care groups urging Wisconsinites to voluntarily wear masks and practice social distancing. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - October 19, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Rich Kirchen Source Type: news

Unraveling the network of molecules that influence COVID-19 severity
(Morgridge Institute for Research) Researchers from the Morgridge Institute for Research, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Albany Medical College have identified more than 200 molecular features that strongly correlate with COVID-19 severity, offering insight into potential treatment options for those with advanced disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 12, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

First relatives of rubella virus discovered in bats in Uganda and mice in Germany
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In a Ugandan forest, a team of American and African scientists take oral swabs from insect-eating cyclops leaf-nosed bats. In a necropsy room near the Baltic Sea, researchers try to determine what killed a donkey, a Bennett's tree-kangaroo and a capybara at a German zoo -- all of them suffering from severe brain swelling. Neither team was aware of the other, yet they were both about to converge on a discovery that would help solve a long-enduring mystery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 7, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Stem cells can repair Parkinson's-damaged circuits in mouse brains
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers demonstrated a proof-of-concept stem cell treatment in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. They found that neurons derived from stem cells can integrate well into the correct regions of the brain, connect with native neurons and restore motor functions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New vaccine strategy harnesses 'foot soldier' T-cells to protect against influenza
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) As Americans begin pulling up their sleeves for an annual flu vaccine, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have provided new insights into an alternative vaccine approach that provides broader protection against seasonal influenza. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 22, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

‘Best’ hospitals should be required to deliver tobacco treatment
AUCLA-led report published today in the  Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine exposes what the authors call a weakness in the high-profile “Best Hospitals Honor Roll” published annually by U.S. News& World Report.The data used to compile the rankings are collected from multiple sources, including outcomes reported to the Joint Commission, an accreditation agency. Every three years, hospitals are required to complete a comprehensive review by the Joint Commission to earn or maintain accreditation. None of the top 20 hospitals in the 2020 –21 U.S. News rankings re...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 21, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

New national imaging center has potential to transform medicine
(Morgridge Institute for Research) A national research initiative announced today will place the University of Wisconsin-Madison at the forefront of a revolution in imaging fostered by cryo-electron microscopy and cryo-electron tomography -- technologies that can illuminate life at the atomic scale. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 21, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The Latest: Wisconsin university eliminates spring break
The University of Wisconsin-Madison has decided to eliminate spring break next semester in an effort to curb the spread of the coronavirus (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - September 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

US stay-at-home orders slowed the spread of coronavirus
The time it took for COVID-19 case numbers to double increased from 2.7 days to six days after stay-home advisories or orders were issued in 42 states, a new University of Wisconsin study shows. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Latest: Madison fraternities, sororities in quarantine
Nine fraternities and sororities are under quarantine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison after 38 students tested positive for the coronavirus (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - September 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Understanding how birds respond to extreme weather can inform conservation efforts
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) How do different bird species respond to extreme weather events that occur for different amounts of time, ranging from weekly events like heat waves to seasonal events like drought? And how do traits unique to different species -- for example, how far they migrate or how commonly they occur -- predict their vulnerability to extreme weather? (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 21, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Patients taking long-term opioids produce antibodies against the drugs
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists have discovered that a majority of back-pain patients they tested who were taking opioid painkillers produced anti-opioid antibodies. These antibodies may contribute to some of the negative side effects of long-term opioid use. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Coping With Campus Coronavirus: US Fraternities, Sororities Give It the Old College Try Coping With Campus Coronavirus: US Fraternities, Sororities Give It the Old College Try
Sixteen gallons of hand sanitizer sat in the foyer of the Alpha Epsilon Phi sorority house at the University of Wisconsin as house mother Karen Mullis reconfigured tables in the dining room to maintain social distancing.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Dignity and respect go a long way in county jail, new research shows
(University of Wisconsin Oshkosh) A University of Wisconsin Oshkosh study indicates a little respect and decency can go a long way in improving some aspects of America's criminal justice system. Matt Richie, an assistant criminal justice professor, recently published 'Managing the Rabble with Dignity and Respect,' in the Journal of Crime and Justice, a publication of the Midwestern Criminal Justice Association. His findings reveal a great deal of the work involves interpersonal communication skills rather than physical force. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Protective antibodies identified for rare, polio-like disease in children
(Purdue University) Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Purdue University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have isolated human monoclonal antibodies that potentially can prevent a rare but devastating polio-like illness in children linked to a respiratory viral infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tiny mineral particles are better vehicles for promising gene therapy
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have developed a safer and more efficient way to deliver a promising new method for treating cancer and liver disorders and for vaccination -- including a COVID-19 vaccine from Moderna Therapeutics that has advanced to clinical trials with humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 2, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Showing pro-diversity feelings are the norm makes individuals more tolerant
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Showing people how their peers feel about diversity in their community can make their actions more inclusive, make members of marginalized groups feel more like they belong, and even help close racial achievement gaps in education, according to a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nationwide Protests Haven ’t Caused a COVID-19 Spike (So Far.) Here’s What We Can Learn From That
The coronavirus situation in the U.S. is bleak. While states like New York and New Jersey successfully turned the tide, others, like Texas and Arizona, are dealing with worsening outbreaks. At the national level, daily cases are rising daily, well exceeding the previous peak set earlier this year. And even in those few states that have gotten a grip on the pandemic, leaders are rethinking their reopening plans for fear of a relapse. But public health officials have spotted at least one bright spot amid all the discouraging data: the nationwide Black Lives Matter protests, which began after George Floyd’s death at the...
Source: TIME: Health - June 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 UnitedWeRise20Disaster Source Type: news

Researchers identify multiple molecules that shut down SARS-Cov-2 polymerase reaction
(Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science) Researchers at Columbia Engineering and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have identified a library of molecules that shut down the SARS-CoV-2 polymerase reaction, a key step that establishes the potential of these molecules as lead compounds to be further modified for the development of COVID-19 therapeutics. Five of these molecules are already FDA-approved for use in the treatment of other viral infections including HIV/AIDS, cytomegalovirus, and hepatitis B. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 30, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Association between dehydration and falls - Hamrick I, Norton D, Birstler J, Chen G, Cruz L, Hanrahan L.
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether there is an association between dehydration and falls in adults 65 years and older. Patients and Methods: We used University of Wisconsin Health electronic health records from October 1, 2011 to September 30, 2015 to condu... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

DHS Announces COVID-19 Population Health Studies
The Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS) is partnering with theUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison ’s Survey of the Health of Wisconsin (SHOW) andWisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene (WSLH), the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM), and theWisconsin Department of Natural Resources to conduct two population health studies that will...(see release) (Source: Wisconsin DHFS Press Releases)
Source: Wisconsin DHFS Press Releases - June 17, 2020 Category: Hospital Management Authors: millejcodn Source Type: news

How is electricity being used in wound care?
Some wounds just don't seem to heal. Now, pioneering medical research has come up with some promising new treatments that employ electricity to speed recovery, killing bacteria more effectively than traditional bandages or antibiotics. Here's a brief summary of these dramatic new developments in healthcare.  Medical research is providing revolutionary new wound care treatments that use electricity to speed healing. The problem: slow-healing or no-healing wounds Physicians and emergency room specialists have long been stymied by chronic wounds that resist most efforts to treat them using conventional antibio...
Source: Advanced Tissue - June 10, 2020 Category: Dermatology Authors: AdvancedTissue Tags: Wound Care Wound healing Wound Infection Source Type: news

Late blight research pairs spectroscopy with classic plant pathology diagnostics
(American Phytopathological Society) Gold and colleagues at the University of Wisconsin-Madison recently published research showing how they used contact spectroscopy to non-destructively sense how plant pathogens differentially damage, impair, and alter plant traits during the course of infection. This research centered on late blight of potato and tomato. The hyperspectral sensors Gold and colleagues used measure light reflectance in the visible to shortwave infrared range of the electromagnetic spectrum- 7x more wavelengths than the human eye can see. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 9, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

First do no harm - researchers urge halt in prescribing hydroxycholoroquine for COVID-19
The sacred oath taken by physicians during graduation from medical school to "First do no harm," the first words of the Hippocratic Oath, provides a strong impetus for a commentary just published in The American Journal of Medicine. Researchers from Florida Atlantic University's Schmidt College of Medicine and collaborators from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health are urging all health care providers to always prioritize compassion with reliable evidence on efficacy and safety. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - June 3, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Study confirms cats can become infected with and may transmit COVID-19 to other cats
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In a study published today (May 13, 2020) in the New England Journal of Medicine, scientists in the U.S. and Japan report that in the laboratory, cats can readily become infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and may be able to pass the virus to other cats. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

2020 Dystel Prize for MS research to Dr Ian Duncan for advances in myelin repair
(National Multiple Sclerosis Society) The 2020 John Dystel Prize for Multiple Sclerosis Research goes to Ian D. Duncan (University of Wisconsin-Madison), for groundbreaking research on how myelin (the protective nerve coating in the central nervous system) is damaged, particularly in MS, and as one of the first researchers to come up with feasible ideas on how to achieve myelin repair. The prize is given jointly by the National MS Society and the American Academy of Neurology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Jurassic Park got it wrong: UW Oshkosh research indicates raptors don't hunt in packs
(University of Wisconsin Oshkosh) A new University of Wisconsin Oshkosh analysis of raptor teeth published in the peer-reviewed journal Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology shows that raptorial dinosaurs likely did not hunt in big, coordinated packs like dogs. Though widely accepted, evidence for this behavior is relatively weak. Recently, scientists have proposed a different model for behavior in raptors that is thought to be more like Komodo dragons, in which individuals may attack the same animal but cooperation is limited. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 6, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Combining mouse and human data uncovers new gene regulating cholesterol
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) By combining the fine-grained detail available from animal studies with the statistical power of genetic studies involving hundreds of thousands of human genomes, researchers have discovered a new gene involved in regulating the body's cholesterol. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 4, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Albany, Wisconsin teams search for molecular clues to defeat COVID-19
(Morgridge Institute for Research) A physician on the COVID 19 front lines -- Dr. Ariel Jaitovich, a pulmonary and critical care physician at the Albany Medical Center in New York--sought out a collaboration with investigators at the Morgridge Institute for Research and the Department of Biomolecular Chemistry at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health (SMPH) to better understand the molecular profile of COVID-19 and provide insights that may improve treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 28, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Nationwide Study Finds Malaria Drug Touted by President Trump Led to More Deaths, No Benefits in Coronavirus Patients
A malaria drug widely touted by President Donald Trump for treating the new coronavirus showed no benefit in a large analysis of its use in U.S. veterans hospitals. There were more deaths among those given hydroxychloroquine versus standard care, researchers reported. The nationwide study was not a rigorous experiment. But with 368 patients, it’s the largest look so far of hydroxychloroquine with or without the antibiotic azithromycin for COVID-19, which has killed more than 171,000 people as of Tuesday. The study was posted on an online site for researchers and has not been reviewed by other scientists. Grants from ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marilynn Marchione / AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk wire Source Type: news

Coronavirus Patients Who Don ’t Speak English Could End Up ‘Unable to Communicate in Their Last Moments of Life’
At the University of Louisville hospital in Kentucky, dozens of patients each day need the help of an interpreter to understand their medical conditions and make informed choices about their care. Before patients in the area showed COVID-19 symptoms, medical interpreters provided translations for as many as 30-40 people each day in Spanish or Amharic—a language spoken primarily in Ethiopia. Like the estimated 100,000 interpreters who work at hospitals across the country, their services — translating word-for-word between doctor and patient, maintaining patient confidentiality and accounting for cultural nuances...
Source: TIME: Health - April 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jasmine Aguilera Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature News Desk Source Type: news

Bharat Biotech in tie-up to develop a Covid vaccine
Bharat Biotech said on Friday that it has partnered with the University of Wisconsin Madison and US-based company FluGen to develop a vaccine, Coro-Flu, against Covid-19. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - April 3, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Chilling concussed cells shows promise for full recovery
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In the future, treating a concussion could be as simple as cooling the brain. That's according to research conducted by University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers, whose findings support the treatment approach at the cellular level. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 2, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Molds damage the lung's protective barrier to spur future asthma attacks
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have identified a new way that common Aspergillus molds can induce asthma, by first attacking the protective tissue barrier deep in the lungs. In both mice and humans, an especially strong response to this initial damage was associated with developing an overreaction to future mold exposure and the constricted airways characteristic of asthma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How new data can make ecological forecasts as good as weather forecasts
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Soon, University of Wisconsin-Madison ecologist Ben Zuckerberg thinks we'll be able to pull off the same forecasting feat for bird migrations and wildlife populations as for climate forecasts. That's because just as those recurring changes in climate have predictable consequences for humans, they also have predictable effects on plants and animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 9, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Automated CT biomarkers predict cardiovascular events better than current practice
In this study, abdominal scans done for routine colorectal cancer screening revealed important information about heart-related risks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 4, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Wisconsin Now Conducting Tests for COVID-19 Virus
The Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS) and the Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (State Lab) announced today that the State Lab is now conducting tests for theCOVID-19 virus. COVID-19 is the novel coronavirus that surfaced in Wuhan, China in late 2019 and has infected people across the world, including more than a dozen people in United States and one person in Wisconsin. The City of Milwaukee Health...(see release) (Source: Wisconsin DHFS Press Releases)
Source: Wisconsin DHFS Press Releases - March 2, 2020 Category: Hospital Management Authors: millejcodn Source Type: news

Vivid scans reveal blood flows differently in men's and women's hearts
Advanced '4D' MRI scans show how blood moves through the left (red) and right (yellow) ventricles of the heart. University of Wisconsin scientists found contrasts between men's and women's hearts. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Newly identified cellular trash removal program helps create new neurons
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) New research by University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists reveals how a cellular filament helps neural stem cells clear damaged and clumped proteins, an important step in eventually producing new neurons. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cells carrying Parkinson's mutation could lead to new model for studying disease
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Parkinson's disease researchers have used gene-editing tools to introduce the disorder's most common genetic mutation into marmoset monkey stem cells and to successfully tamp down cellular chemistry that often goes awry in Parkinson's patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers wake monkeys by stimulating 'engine' of consciousness in brain
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A small amount of electricity delivered at a specific frequency to a particular point in the brain will snap a monkey out of even deep anesthesia, pointing to a circuit of brain activity key to consciousness and suggesting potential treatments for debilitating brain disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cheap nanoparticles stimulate immune response to cancer in the lab
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have developed nanoparticles that, in the lab, can activate immune responses to cancer cells. If they are shown to work as well in the body as they do in the lab, the nanoparticles might provide an effective and more affordable way to fight cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 29, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news