Turn off a light, save a life, says new UW-Madison study
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) We all know that turning off lights and buying energy-efficient appliances affects our financial bottom line. Now, according to a new study by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers, we know that saving energy also saves lives and even more money for consumers by alleviating the costs of adverse health effects attributed to air pollution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How healthy is your county? (Gallery)
Philadelphia is again the unhealthiest among Pennsylvania's 67 counties, according to the "County Health Rankings& RoapMaps" report issued Tuesday by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute. The annual county-by-county rankings take into consideration a variety of factors for the analysis, including health outcomes, health behavior, clinical care, social and economic determinants and physical environment. Philadelphia's low score reflects… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - March 19, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: John George Source Type: news

UW team finds key to common cancer pathway
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A team led by University of Wisconsin-Madison cancer researchers Richard A. Anderson and Vincent Cryns reports the discovery of an unexpected regulator of the critical protein protein p53, opening the door to the development of drugs that could target it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 18, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Teenage T. rex was already chomping on prey, new UW Oshkosh research shows
(University of Wisconsin Oshkosh) New research from the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh indicates that even as a teenager the Tyrannosaurus rex showed signs that it would grow up to be a ferocious predator. In a study published last week in the peer-reviewed journal Peerj--the Journal of Life and Environmental Sciences, UWO scientists reported evidence that a juvenile T. rex fed on a large plant-eating dinosaur, even though it lacked the bone-crushing abilities it would develop as an adult. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 11, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

THOR wrangles complex microbiomes into a model for improving them
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Researchers at the University of Wisconsin developed a community they named THOR, three species of bacteria isolated from soybean roots and grown together. The complex community of microbes developed new behaviors together that couldn't be predicted from the individual members alone -- they grew tougher structures known as biofilms, changed how they moved across their environment, and controlled the release of a novel antibiotic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study confirms horseshoe crabs are really relatives of spiders, scorpions
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) By analyzing troves of genetic data and considering a vast number of possible ways to examine it, University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists now have a high degree of confidence that horseshoe crabs do indeed belong within the arachnids. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Google Doodle Celebrates Mathematician Olga Ladyzhenskaya: ‘One of the Most Influential Thinkers of Her Generation’
Russian mathematician Olga Ladyzhenskaya overcame personal and political hurdles and had a lasting impact on a range of scientific fields, from weather forecasting to cardiovascular science and oceanography. On Thursday Google celebrated her life and achievements with a Google Doodle on what would have been her 97th birthday. Ladyzhenskaya was best known for her studies on partial differential equations. Marshall Slemrod, a mathematician with the University of Wisconsin, told the New York Times, “If you believe your weather forecasts, you have to solve the exact equations that she studied.” Google called her &...
Source: TIME: Science - March 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Madeline Roache Tags: Uncategorized Google onetime Source Type: news

Engineered microbe may be key to producing plastic from plants
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) With a few genetic tweaks, a type of soil bacteria with an appetite for hydrocarbons shows promise as a biological factory for converting a renewable -- but frustratingly untapped -- bounty into a replacement for ubiquitous plastics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Swimming microbes steer themselves into mathematical order
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Freeing thousands of microorganisms to swim in random directions in an infinite pool of liquid may not sound like a recipe for order, but eventually the swarm will go with its own flow. Theoretical modeling led by University of Wisconsin-Madison applied mathematician Saverio Spagnolie shows that the forces generated by different kinds of tiny swimmers will sweep them all up in predictable ways. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 4, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Studies of Deadly Flu Virus, Once Banned, Are Set to Resume
The government will allow research on bird flu that had been halted over safety concerns. But officials have not publicly announced the decision nor explained how it was made. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DENISE GRADY Tags: Research Accidents and Safety Avian Influenza Erasmus Medical Center Health and Human Services Department University of Wisconsin National Institutes of Health National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Madison (Wis) Rotterdam Source Type: news

Exercise Secrets to a Better Bottom
THURSDAY, Feb. 28, 2019 -- If you're bored with doing squats for a better bottom, it's time to vary your workout. For a study sponsored by the American Council on Exercise (ACE), scientists at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse evaluated popular... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 28, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Radiation-resistant E. coli evolved in the lab give view into DNA repair
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Scientists in the University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Biochemistry are blasting E. coli bacteria with ionizing radiation once a week to watch evolution happen in real time as the bacteria become radiation resistant. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 26, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study: No race or gender bias seen in initial NIH grant reviews
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Examinations of National Institutes of Health grants in the last 15 years have shown that white scientists are more likely to be successful in securing funding from the agency than their black peers.A new study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison shows that bias is unlikely to play out in the initial phase of the process NIH uses to review applications for the billions of federal grant dollars it apportions annually to biology and behavior research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New type of wound dressing shocks patients
  While Wound Source estimated that there are over 6,000 types of wound care dressings, the steep number doesn’t stop researchers from testing products for more advanced dressings. Engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison recently developed a new low-cost wound dressing designed to accelerate wound healing. Here are the details on this innovative wound dressing: How does this wound dressing work? While electricity can be beneficial for skin healing, most electrotherapy products require bulky equipment and complex wiring. This new dressing leverages the power of electrical pulses for healing, bu...
Source: Advanced Tissue - February 14, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: AdvancedTissue Tags: Wound care products wound dressings Source Type: news

New Imaging Method Measures Efficacy of Breast Cancer Therapy
Researchers from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health have discovered a new way to measure the efficacy or failure of hormone therapy for breast cancer patients. A study detailing the findings was published in the February issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. The findings showed that positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18F-fluorofuranylnorprogesterone (18F-FFNP) has been found to successfully measure changes in progesterone receptor (PR) levels resulting from a short-course estrogen treatment, also known as an estradiol challenge. Estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer is...
Source: MDDI - February 12, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MDDI Staff Tags: Imaging Source Type: news

Cell component breakdown suggests possible treatment for multiple neural disorders
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Research published today (Feb. 11, 2019) by the Waisman Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison reveals how one mutation causes fragile X, the most common inherited intellectual disability. Fragile X patients have difficulty in learning and language, as well as temper tantrums, hyperactivity and extreme sensitivity to light and sound. The fragile X gene is located on the X chromosome and its mutation affects about 1 in 4,000 boys and 1 in 7,000 girls. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Microbes hitched to insects provide a rich source of new antibiotics
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In an exhaustive search of microbes from more than 1,400 insects collected from diverse environments across North and South America, a UW-Madison research team found that insect-borne microbes often outperformed soil bacteria in stopping some of the most common and dangerous antibiotic-resistant pathogens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 1, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

American Nobel Laureate Knew About Chinese Scientist Gene-Editing Babies, But Did Not Report Him, Emails Show
Long before the claim of the world’s first gene-edited babies became public, Chinese researcher He Jiankui shared the news with a U.S. Nobel laureate who objected to the experiment yet remained an adviser to He’s biotech company. The revelation that another prominent scientist knew of the work, which was widely condemned when it was revealed, comes as scientists debate whether and how to alert troubling research, and the need for clearer guidelines. Emails obtained by The Associated Press under a public records request show that Nobel Prize winner Craig Mello of the University of Massachusetts learned about the...
Source: TIME: Science - January 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: CANDICE CHOI and MARILYNN MARCHIONE / AP Tags: Uncategorized China onetime Source Type: news

An integrative approach to studying lipid biology
(Ecole Polytechnique F é d é rale de Lausanne) The proteins that manage lipids in the cell are notoriously hard to study. Combining structural, biochemical, and computational studies, scientists at EPFL and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have now discovered how a lipid-binding protein can access, select, and move a lipid " cargo " during the biosynthesis of the important coenzyme Q. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Science Advice in the States
In 2006 this column posed the question, "Where are all the state science advisers?" With states challenged to make more decisions about investments in research, science education, and tech-based industry, author Gillian Andres asked, Who is advising the governors? She found that few US states had science advisers within the governor's office. An informal survey conducted by the AIBS Public Policy Office in July 2006 found that just six states (Louisiana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, and Virginia) had identifiable positions. A handful of other states, including Kansas, had had science advisers in the past, an...
Source: Washington Watch - January 24, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: Julie Palakovich Carr Source Type: news

Networking to Boost the Skills of Graduate Teaching Assistants
When Elisabeth Schussler arrived at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, (UT) she used her knowledge of evidence-based teaching practices to revise the undergraduate biology laboratory curriculum. Unfortunately, she had little control over how the curriculum was delivered. Many graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) at UT have never taught before their appointment and are neither required nor have the time to attend professional development programs. "Ineffective teaching can derail good curriculum," says Schussler, who is an assistant professor and the director of biology teaching and learning. "If you don'...
Source: Eye on Education - January 24, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: BioScience Source Type: news

Turmoil at NEON as Advisory Panel Disbanded, Reinstated
Battelle Memorial Institute, a nonprofit government-contractor that manages the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) for the National Science Foundation (NSF), has reinstated a NEON science advisory panel that it had disbanded a week earlier. The twenty-member Science, Technology, and Education Advisory Committee (STEAC), which is comprised of external scientists who advise NEON, was disbanded by Battelle soon after NEON’s Chief Scientist and Principal Investigator, Sharon Collinge, resigned over the firing of two senior managers without her knowledge. Some members of the panel had threatened to resign in ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - January 23, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Is Black Pepper Healthy? Here ’s What the Science Says
Like salt, black pepper sits on almost every kitchen table or countertop in America. But while whole books have been written about sodium consumption and human health, black pepper and its compounds have garnered little attention from experts. But pepper probably deserves more scrutiny. Some research has linked black pepper marinades to the elimination of heterocyclic amines, or HCAs, which are the cancer-causing chemicals that form when meat is charred or cooked at high temperatures. A group at Kansas State University found that mixing one gram of fine black pepper with 100 grams of ground beef—which works out to ab...
Source: TIME: Health - January 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Unraveling threads of bizarre hagfish's explosive slime
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Jean-Luc Thiffeault, a University of Wisconsin-Madison math professor, and collaborators Randy Ewoldt and Gaurav Chaudhary of the University of Illinois have modeled the hagfish's gag-inducing defense mechanism mathematically, publishing their work today in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 15, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Gene-editing tool CRISPR repurposed to develop better antibiotics
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A University of Wisconsin-Madison researcher and his collaborators at the University of California, San Francisco have repurposed the gene-editing tool CRISPR to study which genes are targeted by particular antibiotics, providing clues on how to improve existing antibiotics or develop new ones. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New orders drive ViewRay revenue growth in 2018
Image-guided radiation therapy developer ViewRay reported revenue growth in...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: ViewRay adds to revenue and net loss in Q3 ViewRay to launch pancreatic cancer trial ViewRay announces $150M stock offering ViewRay reports revenue growth but net loss in Q2 ViewRay touts University of Wisconsin MRIdian installation (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - January 8, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Ancient gene duplication gave grasses multiple ways to wait out winter
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) New research shows how grasses count the short days of winter to prepare for flowering. The findings provide valuable insight into how winter-adapted grasses gain the ability to flower in spring, which could be helpful for improving crops, like winter wheat, that rely on this process. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New Weight-Loss Device Aids Rats In Losing Nearly 40% Of Their Body Fat
University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists say they have created a safe and easily implantable weight-loss device that in lab experiments, aided rats in shedding nearly 40% of their body weight. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - December 26, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Robin Seaton Jefferson, Contributor Source Type: news

Skincredible! Researchers create a electronic bandage that helps wounds heal FOUR TIMES faster
A study by the University of Wisconsin-Madison wrapped the e-bandage around the chests of rats who had a cut on their backs. This caused the wound to heal in just three days versus 12 in others. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UWM Athletics expands deal with Orthopaedic Hospital of Wisconsin, now largest-ever sponsorship
The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee ’s athletic department says an expanded partnership with the Orthopaedic Hospital of Wisconsin is the largest-ever sponsorship in the UWM program’s history. UW-Milwaukee officials are not disclosing the dollar amount of the five-year partnership announced Wednesday. Athletic department spokesma n Chris Zills said the largest previous sponsorship ran for seven years and totaled just under $600,000. “This is a five-year deal and is larger both per-year and… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - December 19, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Rich Kirchen Source Type: news

Scientists create a 1cm device that attaches to the stomach and tells the brain it is full
The implant, yet to be named, becomes activated when the stomach naturally starts churning food during digestion. It was developed by a team of experts at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

3 who got Legionnaires' disease in Wisconsin hospital die
University of Wisconsin Hospital says 10 others recovered and were released; blames outbreak on since-flushed hot water system (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - December 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

3 who got Legionnaire's disease in Wisconsin hospital die
University of Wisconsin Hospital says 10 others recovered and were released; blames outbreak on since-flushed hot water system (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - December 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nearly one in five Tibetan refugee schoolchildren has tuberculosis infection, Johns Hopkins study finds
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) In a tuberculosis screening and treatment initiative covering the entire population of Tibetan refugee schoolchildren in northern India, a team directed by researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the University of Wisconsin says it has found not only a startlingly high prevalence of TB disease and infection, but also a potentially workable strategy to eliminate the disease in a large, high-risk group. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 18, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Tiny implantable device short-circuits hunger pangs, aids weight loss
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) New battery-free, easily implantable weight-loss devices developed by engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison could offer a promising new weapon for battling the bulge. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ritalin drives greater connection between brain areas key to memory, attention
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Louis Populin and collaborators at the University of Wisconsin-Madison collaborators published a study this week in the Journal of Neuroscience describing increased connections between key parts of the brains of monkeys who have taken methylphenidate (Ritalin). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Forget 'needle in a haystack'; try finding an invasive species in a lake
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) When the tiny and invasive spiny water flea began appearing in UW-Madison researchers' nets in 2009, scientists began to wonder how Lake Mendota, one of the most-studied lakes in the world, went from flea-free to infested seemingly overnight, undetected by trained technicians. A new report published in the journal Ecosphere says Lake Mendota's story may be the rule, rather than an exception. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 4, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

China Halts Work By Researchers Creating Gene-Edited Babies
HONG KONG — China’s government ordered a halt Thursday to work by a medical team that claimed to have helped make the world’s first gene-edited babies, as a group of leading scientists declared that it’s still too soon to try to make permanent changes to DNA that can be inherited by future generations. Chinese Vice Minister of Science and Technology Xu Nanping told state broadcaster CCTV that his ministry is strongly opposed to the efforts that reportedly produced twin girls born earlier this month. Xu called the team’s actions illegal and unacceptable and said an investigation had been ordere...
Source: TIME: Science - November 29, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized China Genetics onetime Source Type: news

It's not a shock: Better bandage promotes powerful healing
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A new, low-cost wound dressing developed by University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers could dramatically speed up healing in a surprising way. The method leverages energy generated from a patient's own body motions to apply gentle electrical pulses at the site of an injury. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Discovery opens new opportunities to slow or reverse MS
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Nerve cells stripped of their insulation can no longer carry vital information, leading to the numbness, weakness and vision problems often associated with multiple sclerosis. A new study shows an overlooked source may be able to replace that lost insulation and provide a new way to treat diseases like MS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 27, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Could yesterday's Earth contain clues for making tomorrow's medicines?
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In a paper published recently in the journal Origins of Life and Evolution of Biospheres, UW-Madison researchers described initial steps toward achieving chemistries that encode information in a variety of conditions that might mimic the environment of prehistoric Earth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Beneficial gut bacteria metabolize fiber to improve heart health in mice
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In support of a microbial connection between fiber and heart health, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have identified a particular fatty acid as the mechanism behind certain protective effects of a high-fiber diet in a mouse model. Known as butyrate, this fatty acid is produced by certain bacteria in the gut as they digest plant fiber. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Studies Give Mixed Results About Taking Fish Oil and Vitamin D
(CHICAGO) — Taking fish oil or vitamin D? Big studies give long-awaited answers on who does and does not benefit from these popular nutrients. Fish oil taken by healthy people, at a dose found in many supplements, showed no clear ability to lower heart or cancer risks. Same for vitamin D. But higher amounts of a purified, prescription fish oil slashed heart problems and heart-related deaths among people with high triglycerides, a type of fat in the blood, and other risks for heart disease. Doctors cheered the results and said they could suggest a new treatment option for hundreds of thousands of patients like these. ...
Source: TIME: Health - November 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: MARILYNN MARCHIONE / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime Supplements Source Type: news

ViewRay adds to revenue and net loss in Q3
Buoyed by sales of its MRIdian linear accelerator, image-guided radiation therapy...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: ViewRay to launch pancreatic cancer trial ViewRay announces $150M stock offering ViewRay reports revenue growth but net loss in Q2 ViewRay touts University of Wisconsin MRIdian installation ViewRay posts Q1 revenue increase (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - November 9, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Woodland hawks flock to urban buffet
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A team of Wisconsin researchers documents that woodland hawks -- once in precipitous decline due to pollution, persecution and habitat loss -- have become firmly established in even the starkest urban environments, thriving primarily on a diet of backyard birds attracted to feeders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study shows movement, evolutionary history of TB in China
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A genetic scan of a massive number of samples taken from tuberculosis patients across China has shown a surprising genetic uniformity: just two 'strains' of the tuberculosis bacterium account for 99.4 percent of all cases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Twenty years on, measuring the impact of human stem cells
In November 1998, the world was introduced to human embryonic stem cells, the blank slate cells that arise at the earliest stages of development and that go on to become any of the scores of cell types that make up a human. In a succinct paper published in the journal Science and heralded around the world, University of Wisconsin-Madison developmental biologist James Thomson described the first successful derivation and culturing of the master cells of life. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - November 1, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Multidisciplinary team to develop stem cell-based approaches to restore vision
(University of Pennsylvania) Gene therapies have had success in treating blindness but can't save areas of the retina where cells have already died. In a new effort, University of Pennsylvania scientists John Wolfe, also of CHOP, and William Beltran, along with David Gamm of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will attempt to develop a stem-cell-based approach that restores vision. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Here ’s How to Tell if You Have a Cold or the Flu
Your nose is dripping like a leaky faucet, your throat is sore and you can’t stop sneezing. You don’t have a fever, but you feel wiped out—like you could curl up on the floor and fall asleep. Do you have a cold or the flu? If you guessed cold, you’re probably right. But experts say that differentiating the common cold (an upper respiratory infection) from the flu (influenza) can be trickier than most people assume. “There is huge overlap among non-influenza viruses and the symptoms produced by influenza and other bugs,” says Dr. Bruce Barrett, a professor of family medicine and community...
Source: TIME: Health - October 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

Successful mouse couples talk out infidelity in calm tones
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) The quality of conversations between California mice couples after one partner has been unfaithful can help predict which mouse pairs will successfully produce a litter of mouse pups and which males are good fathers, according to a study published recently by the journal Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution in a special issue on the evolution of monogamy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news