Researchers wake monkeys by stimulating 'engine' of consciousness in brain
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A small amount of electricity delivered at a specific frequency to a particular point in the brain will snap a monkey out of even deep anesthesia, pointing to a circuit of brain activity key to consciousness and suggesting potential treatments for debilitating brain disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cheap nanoparticles stimulate immune response to cancer in the lab
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have developed nanoparticles that, in the lab, can activate immune responses to cancer cells. If they are shown to work as well in the body as they do in the lab, the nanoparticles might provide an effective and more affordable way to fight cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 29, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Driven by Earth's orbit, climate changes in Africa may have aided human migration
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) New research describes a dynamic climate and vegetation model that explains when regions across Africa, areas of the Middle East, and the Mediterranean were wetter and drier and how the plant composition changed in tandem, possibly providing migration corridors throughout time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 27, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Discovery sheds new light on how cells move
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Through experiments, UW-Madison researchers found that the force each cell applies to the surface beneath it -- in other words, traction -- is the dominant physical factor that controls cell shape and motion as cells travel as a group. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ronald S. Brookmeyer named dean of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health
Ronald S. Brookmeyer, professor of biostatistics and expert on how statistical tools can help address global public health challenges, will become the dean of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, effective Jan. 15.A member of the UCLA faculty since 2010, Brookmeyer has served as interim dean of the Fielding School since November 2018.“I am humbled by this opportunity to advance public health at our extraordinary public university,” Brookmeyer said. “With Fielding School faculty, staff and students, as well as colleagues and communities in our hometown of Los Angeles and far beyond, I look forward to...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 9, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

It's in the air: Air pollution can increase the risk of atherosclerosis, study says
(Natural News) Aside from the lungs, a recent study showed that air pollution affects heart health as well. Researchers from the University of Buffalo, University of Washington and the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health found that exposure to ground-level ozone may damage the arteries and increase the risk of atherosclerosis. The research and its findings are... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Adenovirus Outbreak Affects 3 University Of Wisconsin Campuses, What Is This Virus?
Something is going viral on three University of Wisconsin campuses, and it isn ’t a pretty picture. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - December 7, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Y. Lee, Contributor Source Type: news

Human migration out of Africa may have followed monsoons in the Middle East
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A new study published this week [Nov. 25, 2019] in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by American and Israeli geoscientists and climatologists provides evidence that summer monsoons from Asia and Africa may have reached into the Middle East for periods of time going back at least 125,000 years, providing suitable corridors for human migration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

December's SLAS technology feature article now available
(SLAS (Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening)) Next month's SLAS Technology features the cover article, 'Automated System for Small-Population Single-Particle Processing Enabled by Exclusive Liquid Repellency,' outlining research led by Chao Li, Ph.D., (University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA) (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 26, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Steep energy bills can lead families into poverty, nationwide study shows
(University of Wisconsin Oshkosh) While it makes sense that families living below the poverty line have a difficult time covering their energy bills, new University of Wisconsin Oshkosh research shows the reverse to be true as well ... high energy bills can lead a household into poverty. The nationwide study--led by UWO environmental sociologist Jeremiah Bohr and published Nov. 15 in the peer-reviewed journal Social Forces--indicates that dedicating inordinate amounts of income to energy services can threaten a family's well-being over time (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Americans maintain high levels of trust in science
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A new report analyzing decades of public opinion surveys reveals that the public's trust in scientists has remained stable and high over decades. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lifelike chemistry created in lab search for ways to study origin of life
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have cultivated lifelike chemical reactions while pioneering a new strategy for studying the origin of life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 14, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Hospital First in U.S. to Gain Imactis CT-Navigation System
UW Health, the academic medical center and health system of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is using a new approach to computed tomography (CT) guided procedures. It is the first U.S. hospital to acquire the Imactis CT-Navigation system, which can be used during percutaneous interventional radiological procedures performed under CT such as tumor ablations, biopsies, musculoskeletal interventions, and other needle-based interventions, Imactis reported in a news release. With the Imactis CT-Navigation system, a “radiologist can select and check a needle’s planned trajectory in real ti...
Source: MDDI - November 13, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: Imaging Source Type: news

Injectable, flexible electrode could replace rigid nerve-stimulating implants
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) By electrically stimulating nerves, neuromodulation therapies can reduce epileptic seizures, soothe chronic pain, and treat depression and a host of other health conditions without the use of conventional drugs like opioids. Now, University of Wisconsin-Madison biomedical engineers and their collaborators have made a significant advance that could dramatically reduce the cost of neuromodulation therapy, increase its reliability and make it much less invasive. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Warning to mothers-to-be as common chemical found in insecticides 'raises risk of rare birth defect'
Scientists at at University of Wisconsin-Madison's School of Veterinary Medicine found mice given a dose of piperonyl butoxide had offspring with stunted brain development. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

4 Ways to Support Medical Packaging Education
With skilled labor harder than ever to find, it’s everyone’s responsibility to encourage young people to see a medical packaging career as interesting and lucrative. This is the philosophy behind a 30-year relationship between Prent Corporation (Janesville, WI) and University of Wisconsin-Stout (Menomonie, WI). Together they’ve supported hundreds of young professionals entering into packaging, much to the benefit of the students, the school, and the industry as a whole. Prent is a medical packaging thermoform company that strives to bring more talented people into the i...
Source: MDDI - October 11, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Lisa Balcerak Tags: Packaging Source Type: news

Why Being An Optimist Is Good For Your Heart
(CNN) — Looking on the bright side could save your life. People who look at life from a positive perspective have a much stronger shot at avoiding death from any type of cardiovascular risk than pessimistic people, according to a new meta-analysis of nearly 300,000 people published Friday in the medical journal JAMA. “We observed that an optimist had about a 35% lower risk of major heart complications, such as a cardiac death, stroke or a heart attack, compared to the pessimists in each of these studies,” said cardiologist Dr. Alan Rozanski, a professor of medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Offbeat CNN Source Type: news

Philosophers, Artists and Geochemists. These Are the 2019 MacArthur ‘Genius Grant’ Winners
A poet, a legal scholar, a theater artist, a paleoclimatologist, an urban designer and a marine scientist are among the luminaries who have been named as this year’s MacArthur fellows. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation on Wednesday named 26 people who will each receive $625,000 over five years to use as they please. The Chicago-based foundation has awarded the so-called genius grants every year since 1981 to help further the pursuits of people with outstanding talent. The 2019 fellows are: Elizabeth Anderson, 59: philosopher, University of Michigan. Sujatha Baliga, 48: attorney and restorative justice...
Source: TIME: Science - September 25, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized awards onetime Source Type: news

New Technology Could Help Reverse Baldness
BOSTON (CBS) — Hair loss can be distressing for both men and women, but engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a new technology that could one day help reverse baldness. The device stimulates the skin with low-frequency, painless electric pulses that coax hair follicles that have essentially fallen asleep to resume hair production. Instead of requiring a bulky battery pack, the device is powered by the person’s day to day movements, and it is so small it could be worn under a regular baseball cap. They tested the technology on hairless mice and found that it stimulated hair growth as ef...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local baldness Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Hat that zaps the scalp with electricity helps reverse male balding, scientists say 
The patch generates electric pulses triggered by movement. Engineer Xudong Wang at the University of Wisconsin said his father had grown new hair after a month of using a prototype. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Want To Live Longer? Be An Optimist, Boston Researchers Say
(CNN) — You don’t have to be a Monty Python fan to whistle along with Eric Idle as he croons “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life” while contemplating death on a cross. British satire aside, focusing on the upside of life could easily be the theme song for research focusing on a key component of longevity: optimism. Optimism doesn’t mean ignoring life’s stressors. But when negative things happen, optimistic people are less likely to blame themselves and more likely to see the obstacle as temporary or even positive. They also believe they have control over their fate and can create opp...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Offbeat Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Source Type: news

Health Tip: Treating a Torn Nail
-- Tearing a nail from the nail bed can be very painful. From infection to a jam, nail separation can have a variety of causes, says the University of Wisconsin. To treat a torn nail, the school suggests: Trim or file any sharp edges. Trim off the... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 26, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

How Exercise Lowers the Risk of Alzheimer ’s by Changing Your Brain
In this study, they showed that intervening with an exercise regimen could actually affect these processes. Taken together, his body of research is establishing exactly how physical activity contributes to significant changes in the biological processes that drive Alzheimer’s, and may even reduce the effect of strong risk factors such as age and genes linked to higher risk of neurodegenerative disease. For example, in their earlier work his group confirmed that as people age, the presence of Alzheimer’s-related brain changes increases—including the buildup of amyloid, slower breakdown of glucose by brain ...
Source: TIME: Health - August 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Alzheimer's Brain Exercise/Fitness Source Type: news

Major Surgery Linked to Lasting Change in Cognitive Trajectory
THURSDAY, Aug. 7, 2019 -- Major surgery is associated with a small, long-term change in the average cognitive trajectory, according to a study published online Aug. 7 in The BMJ. Bryan M. Krause, Ph.D., from the University of Wisconsin in Madison,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 8, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Major surgery ages your brain by FIVE MONTHS by the time you die, study finds
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin found surgery patients who had to stay in hospital for two days or more had a 5.5 per cent chance of 'substantial brain decline', up from 2.4 per cent. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fei Zhao to launch lab at University of Wisconsin
NIEHS visiting fellow moves to Madison in January, where he will continue his groundbreaking reproductive development research. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - August 1, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

New Penis Implant Raises the Bar for Erectile Dysfunction Solutions
U.S. surgeons treating erectile dysfunction (ED) now have access to a malleable penile prosthesis that is easier to implant and designed to offer the patient and his partner a "more authentic, natural-feeling" erection. The recently-launched Tactra prosthesis is manually lifted up for intercourse and manually pushed down when not in use. It is the first new innovation in penile implants from Boston Scientific in more than a decade. The Tactra is designed with a natural-feeling dual-layer silicone and includes a nitinol core, which is supposed to help optimize comfort, rigidity,...
Source: MDDI - July 29, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Implants Source Type: news

Investigation into fungal infection reveals genetic vulnerability in Hmong
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A new study led by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers Caitlin Pepperell and Bruce Klein has identified a specific genetic vulnerability among Hmong people that renders them more susceptible to the disease-causing fungus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 15, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

SNMMI: Whole-body dynamic PET matches standard images
ANAHEIM, CA - Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison developed...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Video from SNMMI 2019: Dr. Barry Siegel on PET reimbursement SNMMI: PET spotlights link between Down syndrome, Alzheimer's SNMMI: PET ligand can diagnose brain disorder before autopsy SNMMI: Technetium radiotracer tracks rheumatoid arthritis SNMMI: FDG-PET/MRI improves pain diagnosis, management (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - June 27, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

How inhaled fungal spores cause fatal meningitis
(PLOS) Pathogenic fungal spores capitalize on host immune cells to escape the lung and gain access to the brain to cause fatal disease in mice, according to a study published June 27, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Christina Hull of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and colleagues. These insights into the interactions between pathogenic fungal spores and lung immune cells provide new opportunities for understanding spore-mediated fungal diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 27, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Long delays prescribing new antibiotics hinder market for needed drugs
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) US hospitals wait over a year on average to begin prescribing newly developed antibiotics, a delay that might threaten the supply or discourage future development of needed drugs, according to a University of Wisconsin-Madison study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heat kills invasive jumping worm cocoons, could help limit spread
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) New research out of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Arboretum shows that temperatures of about 100 degrees Fahrenheit kill the cocoons of invasive jumping worms. That's good news for ecologists and horticulturalists who are working to slow or stop the spread of the worms, which can damage the soils they invade. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Record-low fertility rates linked to decline in stable manufacturing jobs
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) New research by University of Wisconsin-Madison sociologist Nathan Seltzer identifies a link between the long-term decline in manufacturing jobs -- accelerated during the Great Recession -- and reduced fertility rates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Resilience of Yellowstone's forests tested by unprecedented fire
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) The University of Wisconsin-Madison's Monica Turner and her team describe what happens when Yellowstone -- adapted to recurring fires every 100 to 300 years -- instead burns twice in fewer than 30 years. Yellowstone as we know it faces an uncertain future, the researchers say, and one of the big questions they hope to answer is whether the forests can recover. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Jawless fish take a bite out of the blood-brain barrier
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A jawless parasitic fish could help lead the way to more effective treatments for multiple brain ailments, including cancer, trauma and stroke. A team of biomedical engineers and clinician-scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Texas at Austin borrowed molecules from the immune system of the parasitic sea lamprey to deliver anti-cancer drugs directly to brain tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Medical College of Wisconsin, UW med school trail national minority-enrollment figures
Although both the Medical College of Wisconsin and the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health ramped up minority-recruitment efforts in recent years, Wisconsin ’s two medical schools trail the national average for enrolling racial minorities. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 13, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Rich Kirchen Source Type: news

UW-Madison research team finds new ways to generate stem cells more efficiently
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A new study published in Cell Reports by a team of researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Wisconsin Institute for Discovery and School of Medicine and Public Health could improve the efficiency of creating induced pluripont stem cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Hearing researcher Robert Fettiplace named a Passano Fellow; 2nd major scientific award
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) The University of Wisconsin-Madison's Robert Fettiplace has been named a 2019 Passano Fellow for his research into the mechanics of hearing, his second prestigious international scientific prize in a year. Fettiplace, a professor of neuroscience at the UW School of Medicine and Public Health, won the award for showing how cochlear hair cells sense the tiny mechanical vibrations that sound produces in the inner ear. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Industry-ready process makes plastics chemical from plant sugars
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A team from the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center and the University of Wisconsin-Madison describe an efficient and economically feasible process for producing HMF, a versatile plant-derived chemical considered crucial for building a renewable economy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 3, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

H3N2 viruses mutate during vaccine production but new tech could fix it
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A new technology developed by the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Yoshihiro Kawaoka may make H3N2 vaccine development a bit easier. In Nature Microbiology today [April 29, 2019], Kawaoka and his team describe a new cell line that enables better growth of H3N2 for vaccine use. The virus is also far less likely to mutate during production using this cell line, improving the chances of a match between vaccine and circulating influenza viruses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 29, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Clinical Management of Patients with Ebola: The Nebraska Experience
Source: University of Wisconsin (UW). Published: 4/19/2019. This one-hour Grand Rounds lecture presents a case study about caring for patients with Ebola virus disease at the Nebraska Medical Center in 2014. The speaker discusses the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, prevention, and treatment of Ebola virus disease; describes clinical and operational lessons learned from the care of patients with Ebola virus disease; and provides programs and educational resources to learn more about emerging infectious diseases and hospital preparedness. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medici...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - April 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Microbiomes of diabetic foot ulcers are associated with clinical outcomes
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) New research suggests that the microbial communities associated with chronic wounds common in diabetic patients affect whether those wounds heal or lead to amputations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 18, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UW-Madison School of Pharmacy designs promising new compounds to fight deadly mosquito-transmitted viruses
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) University of Wisconsin-Madison pharmacy Professor Jennifer Golden is one of three principal investigators on a multidisciplinary research team whose work is funded by a new, five-year, $21 million award from the National Institutes of Health establishing a new Center of Excellence for Encephalitic Alphavirus Therapeutics, which will support the preclinical development of small molecules to treat EEVs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 16, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Blood-based colon cancer screen shows promise in UW-Madison study
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In a study published April 8, 2019, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a group of University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists has identified four blood-based fingerprints -- human protein markers -- associated with the pre-cancerous forms of colon cancer that are most likely to develop into disease.The scientists expect their findings will ultimately lead to a blood test for the cancer, adding a method to help increase screening rates while reducing overtreatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 8, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Pregnant women with long commutes to work at increased risk for adverse birth outcomes
(Lehigh University) In a study published in Economics& Human Biology researchers from Lehigh University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison found that pregnant women who commute long-distance to work have an increased risk of adverse birth outcomes, including having babies born at a low-birth weight. The study is the first to examine the impact of long-distance commuting during pregnancy on infant health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ethicon seeks data on Neuwave liver ablations
  Ethicon’s Neuwave is a target ablation tool for small to large lesions, as well as a resection tool. (Image from Ethicon) Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) subsidiary Ethicon said it has launched a global registry to collect and analyze real-world data on patients with soft tissue liver lesions ablated with the company’s Neuwave microwave ablation system. The multicenter, observational registry will follow approximately 1,500 patients worldwide for five years from the date of their first liver ablation procedure with the Neuwave system, a minimally invasive microwave ablation technology that uses heat tra...
Source: Mass Device - March 26, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Blog News Well Research & Development Surgical Ethicon johnson&johnson societyofinterventionalradiology Source Type: news

Not all carrot germplasm is the same -- in terms of salinity tolerance
(American Society for Horticultural Science) A study out of The USDA Agricultural Research Service at the University of Wisconsin has evaluated the response of diverse carrot germplasm to salinity stress, identified salt-tolerant carrot germplasm that may be used by breeders, and defined appropriate screening criteria for assessing salt tolerance in germinating carrot seed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 26, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Turn off a light, save a life, says new UW-Madison study
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) We all know that turning off lights and buying energy-efficient appliances affects our financial bottom line. Now, according to a new study by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers, we know that saving energy also saves lives and even more money for consumers by alleviating the costs of adverse health effects attributed to air pollution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How healthy is your county? (Gallery)
Philadelphia is again the unhealthiest among Pennsylvania's 67 counties, according to the "County Health Rankings& RoapMaps" report issued Tuesday by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute. The annual county-by-county rankings take into consideration a variety of factors for the analysis, including health outcomes, health behavior, clinical care, social and economic determinants and physical environment. Philadelphia's low score reflects… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - March 19, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: John George Source Type: news

UW team finds key to common cancer pathway
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A team led by University of Wisconsin-Madison cancer researchers Richard A. Anderson and Vincent Cryns reports the discovery of an unexpected regulator of the critical protein protein p53, opening the door to the development of drugs that could target it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 18, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news