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Is the First Bioprinted Heart Just Around the Corner?
A Chicago bioprinting startup that seeks to 3-D print human hearts for transplantation has added to its scientific advisory board of heavy hitters. But its CEO won’t say how close the company is to producing its first viable heart. Biolife4D just announced it has added regenerative biomaterials expert Adam  Feinberg, PhD to lead its scientific advisory team. Feinberg is associate professor of materials science & engineering and biomedical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University and principal investigator of the regenerative biomaterials and therapeutics group. Feinberg uses materials-based engine...
Source: MDDI - November 17, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Cardiovascular Implants Source Type: news

In the heart of devastating outbreak, research team unlocks secrets of Ebola
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In a comprehensive and complex molecular study of blood samples from Ebola patients in Sierra Leone, published today (Nov. 16, 2017) in Cell Host and Microbe, a scientific team led by the University of Wisconsin-Madison has identified signatures of Ebola virus disease that may aid in future treatment efforts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 16, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Helius Medical touts PoNS TBI-treatment trial data despite primary effectiveness miss
Helius Medical Technologies (TSX:HSM) today released results from a registrational trial of its Portable Neuromodulation Stimulator, used to treat patients with chronic balance deficits due to mild-to-moderate traumatic brain injuries, touting positive effects but a missed primary effectiveness endpoint. The Newtown, Penn.-based company’s PONS system is designed to treat neurological symptoms, caused by trauma or disease, non-invasively through the tongue. “We are excited to be on the forefront of research that may bring this novel and exciting therapy to patients in need. The investigators and resear...
Source: Mass Device - November 9, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation Helius Medical Technologies Source Type: news

Breeding highly productive corn has reduced its ability to adapt
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison wanted to know whether the last 100 years of selecting for corn that is acclimated to particular locations has changed its ability to adapt to new or stressful environments. By measuring populations of corn plants planted across North America, they could test how the corn genomes responded to different growing conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 9, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New model reveals possibility of pumping antibiotics into bacteria
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Researchers in the University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Biochemistry have discovered that a cellular pump known to move drugs like antibiotics out of E. coli bacteria has the potential to bring them in as well, opening new lines of research into combating the bacteria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Spacing out after staying up late? Here ’s why
Ever sleep poorly and then walk out of the house without your keys? Or space out while driving to work and nearly hit a stalled car?A new study led by UCLA ’sDr. Itzhak Fried is the first to reveal how sleep deprivation disrupts brain cells ’ ability to communicate with each other. Fried and his colleagues believe that disruption leads to temporary mental lapses that affect memory and visual perception. Their findings are published online today by Nature Medicine.“We discovered that starving the body of sleep also robs neurons of the ability to function properly,” said Fried, the study’s ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 6, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Morgridge, UW scientists explore national security implications of gene editing
(Morgridge Institute for Research) A trio of scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Morgridge Institute for Research participated in an international think tank this month on the intersection of genome editing technology and national security. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study shows how cells can be led down non-cancer path
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) As cells with a propensity for cancer break down food for energy, they reach a fork in the road: They can either continue energy production as healthy cells, or shift to the energy production profile of cancer cells. In a new study, University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers map out the molecular events that direct cells' energy metabolism down the cancerous path. Their findings could lead to ways to interrupt the process. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A little myelin goes a long way to restore nervous system function
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A team of researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison reports that in long-lived animals, renewed but thin myelin sheaths are enough to restore the impaired nervous system and can do so for years after the onset of disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

H7N9 influenza is both lethal and transmissible in animal model for flu
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In 2013, an influenza virus began circulating among poultry in China. It caused several waves of human infection and as of late July 2017, nearly 1,600 people had tested positive for avian H7N9. Nearly 40 percent of those infected had died. In 2017, Yoshihiro Kawaoka of the University of Wisconsin-Madison received a sample of H7N9 virus isolated from a patient in China who had died of the flu. He and his research team subsequently began work to characterize and understand it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Good fathers essential to having healthy, well-balanced children, primate research finds
(Natural News) A recent study published in PLOS ONE has revealed that common marmosets born to responsive fathers have a greater likelihood of surviving during their first 30 days and are more likely to exhibit better weight gain after weaning from their mother’s milk. The study, carried out by a team of researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, focused on... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Autism prevalence and socioeconomic status: What's the connection?
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Children living in neighborhoods where incomes are low and fewer adults have bachelor's degrees are less likely to be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder compared to kids from more affluent neighborhoods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UW wins $7 million grant to wean crops from nitrogen fertilizers
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Florida will use a $7 million grant from the US Department of Energy to study how some plants partner with bacteria to create usable nitrogen and to transfer this ability to the bioenergy crop poplar. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 3, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Stanford, MIT and Harvard top the third annual Reuters Top 100 ranking of the most innovative universities
Stanford University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University top the third annual Reuters Top 100 ranking of the world’s most innovative universities. The Reuters Top 100 aims to identify and rank the educational institutions doing the most to advance science, invent new technologies, and power new markets and industries. Compiled in partnership with Clarivate Analytics, the ranking is based on proprietary data and analysis of numerous indicators including patent filings and research paper citations. The most innovative university in the world, for the third consecutive year, is Stanford Univ...
Source: News from STM - September 29, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Featured World Source Type: news

The Real ‘Special Snowflakes’ In Campus Free-Speech Debates
Many conservatives believe that universities and colleges have become illiberal spaces that stifle free speech. They point to the violent protests at the University of California, Berkeley, that prevented Milo Yiannopoulos from speaking, or the threat of protests that led to the cancelation of Ann Coulter’s appearance at the school. With horror, they recall what happened to Charles Murray at Middlebury College and list examples of coddled students protesting the likes of Condoleezza Rice. All of which reflects, they believe, a broader culture on campuses designed to quarantine students from diverse political opinions...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Eddie S. Glaude, Jr. Tags: Uncategorized campus protests free speech Source Type: news

A flexible new platform for high-performance electronics
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A team of University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers has created the most functional flexible transistor in the world -- and with it, a fast, simple and inexpensive fabrication process that's easily scalable to the commercial level. It's an advance that could open the door to an increasingly interconnected world, enabling manufacturers to add 'smart,' wireless capabilities to any number of large or small products or objects -- like wearable sensors and computers for people and animals -- that curve, bend, stretch and move. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The FDA Is Coming Around to the Idea That Cheese, Microbes, and Mold Can Work Just Fine
Fuzzy ashen mold billows around wheels of cheese stacked on wooden planks at La Ferme de L’Abérieux. Inside its cheese cave nestled in the hills of Cordon, southeastern France, proprietor Albert Bottollier Depois removes one wheel and lowers it to the wide eyes of two children. “Mushrooms,” he says threading his fingers through the cloudy wreath of fungus forming the cheese’s distinctive crust. For a stronger cheese, he’ll even pierce the rind so it seeps in and blooms in the eyes. This is a Tomme de Savoie, one of France’s most distinguished and sought-after cheeses. And yet it h...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Casey Quackenbush / Cordon, France Tags: Uncategorized Cheese Food Safety onetime Source Type: news

New NNLM MAR Health Professions Coordinator
On September 18, Erin Seger joined the staff of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region, as Health Professions Coordinator. Erin has a B.S. in Community Health Education from University of Wisconsin- La Crosse and a newly awarded Master’s in Public Health from University of Illinois- Chicago. She has been a Certified Health Education Specialist since 2009. Most recently, she was a health educator embedded in the Northwestern Memorial Hospital’s Health Learning Center. She has years of outreach, training and health coaching experience. As Health Professions Coordinator, Er...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - September 20, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kate Flewelling Tags: @ the RML Health Professionals Outreach Public Health Source Type: news

See Stunning New Images of Irma and Jose From Space
As if Hurricane Irma’s trail of devastation wasn’t enough, leaving millions without power in Florida and desperation along the Caribbean, Hurricane Jose is following in the storm’s footsteps. We can now watch Irma and Jose’s stunning fury nearly in real time. Researchers and engineers at the Space and Science Engineering Center at University of Wisconsin-Madison stitched together daytime and nighttime imagery for a full, composite picture of the storms, made available to TIME. The images are produced by combining recordings from two satellites. The first satellite is the the new “GOES-16&rdquo...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Pratheek Rebala Tags: Uncategorized hurricane irma hurricane jose Hurricanes interactive studios satellite imagery satellites space Source Type: news

J.J. Watt Got a Hero ’s Welcome in His First Game After Raising Millions for Harvey Relief
Waving the Texas state flag, NFL star J.J. Watt made an emotional return to the field Sunday after raising millions of dollars for the victims of Hurricane Harvey. Watt, the Houston Texans’ star defensive end, emerged as a hero in Texas off the field after Harvey caused catastrophic flooding and destruction in the Lone Star State. In the days after the storm made landfall, Watt created a crowdfunding page to raise money for those impacted by the storm, with a modest goal of $200,000. His fundraising efforts have surpassed $31 million in donations as of Sunday afternoon. For the Houston Texans’ first regular se...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer Calfas Tags: Uncategorized NFL onetime Source Type: news

Funding Award for Simulation Technology in Nursing!
The objectives of this project include: Increase learner access to mobile devices in the Learning Resource Center and Simulation Center. Increase the integration of augmented reality and gaming into simulation activities. Increase access to applications (apps) that support learner success in a simulation environment. (Source: The Cornflower)
Source: The Cornflower - September 6, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Derek Johnson Tags: Funding Technology Source Type: news

Microbes compete for nutrients, affect metabolism, development in mice
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) If our microbiome overindulges, we might not have access to the nutrients we need. That's the suggestion from new research conducted by University of Wisconsin-Madison Professor Federico Rey's group that shows mice that harbor high levels of microbes that eat choline are deprived of this essential nutrient. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Amid environmental change, lakes surprisingly static
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In recent decades, change has defined our environment in the United States. Agriculture intensified. Urban areas sprawled. The climate warmed. Intense rainstorms became more common. But, says a new University of Wisconsin-Madison study, while those kinds of changes usually result in poor water quality, lakes have surprisingly stayed the same. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 23, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New Program Aims to Keep OB/GYNs in Rural America
Women in rural areas of the U.S. often have to travel 30, 60, 90 minutes or more in order to reach a facility with maternity services. A new residency program at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health seeks to address this issue by training obstetrician/gynecologists in rural areas - with the hope they will eventually work there. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - August 19, 2017 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Study: Telehealth increased office visits, had minimal health benefits
A recent study from the University of Wisconsin found that encouraging patients to use online care options increases the number of office visits and phone calls and reduces the number of new patients providers can accept. The reason? These providers feel an added obligation to see those patients in person. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - August 17, 2017 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Now showing: Researchers create first 3-D movie of virus in action
(University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee) Imaging the movement of a virus demonstrates that single-particle X- ray scattering has the potential to shed new light on key molecular processes when paired with powerful new algorithms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 14, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Canary in a coal mine: Survey captures global picture of air pollution's effects on birds
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Writing Aug. 11 in the journal Environmental Research Letters, University of Wisconsin-Madison Professor Tracey Holloway, an expert on air quality, and her former graduate student Olivia Sanderfoot sort through nearly 70 years of the scientific literature to assess the state of knowledge of how air pollution directly affects the health, well-being, reproductive success and diversity of birds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New measure of insulin-making cells could gauge diabetes progression, treatment
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a new measurement for the volume and activity of beta cells, the source of the sugar-regulating hormone insulin. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Attitudes on human genome editing vary, but all agree conversation is necessary
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In a study published Aug. 11 in the journal Science, researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Temple University assessed what people in the United States think about the uses of human genome editing and how their attitudes may drive public discussion. They found a public divided on its uses but united in the importance of moving conversations forward. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic picks up 11% stake in neuromod startup NeuroOne
The Mayo Clinic as acquired an 10.9% stake in epilepsy treatment neuromod startup NeuroOne’s parent firm, according an SEC filing from the company. NeuroOne is developing a “thin film” electrode technology, originally from the University of Wisconsin, designed to be implanted in the brain. The film can detect irregular brain activity, accurate to single neurons, to pinpoint the source of seizures and tremors, according to the filing, and has been used in testing at the Mayo Clinic. The technology combines detection alongside deep brain stimulation treatment and ablation capabilities to monitor and treat i...
Source: Mass Device - August 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Neurological Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation Mayo Clinic neuroone Source Type: news

Zika infections unlikely to be passed by kissing, casual contact
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) According to researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison who conducted studies with monkeys, casual contact like kissing or sharing a fork or spoon is not enough for the virus to move between hosts. Their findings were published Aug. 1, 2017, in the journal Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 1, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Undocumented immigration doesn't worsen drug, alcohol problems in US, study indicates
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Despite being saddled with many factors associated with drug and alcohol problems, undocumented immigrants are not increasing the prevalence of drug and alcohol crimes and deaths in the United States, according to a new University of Wisconsin-Madison study published in the American Journal of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

To pick a great gift, it's better to give AND receive
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) If it's the thought that makes a gift count, here's a thought that can make your gift count extra: Get a little something for yourself. Research published this month in the journal Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin by Evan Polman, marketing professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Sam Maglio, marketing professor at the University of Toronto Scarborough, shows that gift recipients are happier with a present when the giver got themselves the same present. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers crack the smile, describing 3 types by muscle movement
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) The smile may be the most common and flexible expression, used to reveal some emotions, cover others and manage social interactions that have kept communities secure and organized for millennia.But how do we tell one kind of smile from another? (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mosquito Species Capable of Transmitting Zika Virus Found in Dane County
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin Medical Entomology Laboratory (UWMEL) and health officials from the Department of Health Services (DHS) and Public Health Madison-Dane County (PHMDC) today announced that the Aedes albopictus mosquito has been found in Dane County. This is the first documentation of this species of mosquito in Wisconsin. Aedes albopictus is one type of mosquito that is capable of spreadingZika virus, however there is no evidence of Zika-...(see release) (Source: Wisconsin DHFS Press Releases)
Source: Wisconsin DHFS Press Releases - July 17, 2017 Category: Hospital Management Authors: yunkecfrrr Source Type: news

Pauses in speech may indicate Alzheimer ’s disease
Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison found that people with a family history of the condition are less able to express their ideas and have reduced 'fluency' when speaking. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Advance furthers stem cells for use in drug discovery, cell therapy
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Using an automated screening test that they devised, William Murphy, a professor of biomedical engineering, and colleagues Eric Nguyen and William Daly have invented an all-chemical replacement for the confusing, even dangerous materials, now used to grow stem cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study reveals interplay of an African bat, a parasite and a virus
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A lack of evidence that bats are key reservoirs of human disease has not prevented their vilification or efforts to exterminate bat colonies where threats are presumed to lurk. 'The fact is that they provide important ecosystem services...and we want them around,' says Tony Goldberg, a University of Wisconsin-Madison epidemiologist and virus hunter. 'But bats are also increasingly acknowledged as hosts of medically significant viruses. I have mixed feelings about that.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 13, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Summer Outreach at Ebling Library
For the past several summers, Ebling Library librarians have given orientations and taught high school and undergraduate students visiting campus for three different programs. In addition to tell them about resources at Ebling Library we give them a healthy dose of information regarding NLM resources. First, the UW-Madison School of Pharmacy hosts high school students enrolled in the Pre-College Enrichment Opportunity Program for Learning Excellence (PEOPLE) program. This eight week program introduces the students to a variety of health science careers. The program serves as a pre-college pipeline for students of color and...
Source: The Cornflower - July 11, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: hspielbauer Tags: Outreach Source Type: news

Mike Steuerwald, MD Joins the Difficult Airway Course: EMS as Associate Medical Director
FARMINGTON, Connecticut.—First Airway, LLC, the creator of The Difficult Airway Course: EMS, is pleased to announce the appointment of Mike Steuerwald, MD as the new Associate Medical Director. Dr. Steuerwald is the Director of Emergency Airway Management and the Assistant Medical Director of UW Med Flight, as well as an Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. He has been an instructor in prehospital and emergency medicine since 2011 and is a regular contributor to Free Open-Access Medical Education (FOAMed).  Dr. Steuerwald has been an active EMS provider since 2...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - July 7, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Administration and Leadership Industry News Source Type: news

Mike Steuerwald, MD Joins the Difficult Airway Course: EMS as Associate Medical Director
FARMINGTON, Connecticut.—First Airway, LLC, the creator of The Difficult Airway Course: EMS, is pleased to announce the appointment of Mike Steuerwald, MD as the new Associate Medical Director. Dr. Steuerwald is the Director of Emergency Airway Management and the Assistant Medical Director of UW Med Flight, as well as an Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. He has been an instructor in prehospital and emergency medicine since 2011 and is a regular contributor to Free Open-Access Medical Education (FOAMed).  Dr. Steuerwald has been an active EMS provider since 2...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - July 7, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Administration and Leadership Industry News Source Type: news

Alzheimer's risk higher for people who sleep badly
Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison found that those that often suffer from a bad night's sleep have more of the biological signs that indicate they are at risk of Alzheimer's. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Public Library Spotlight: Angela Meyers, Coordinator of Youth and Special Needs Services, Bridges Library System
The first in our new Public Library Spotlight series! Name: Angela Meyers Title: Coordinator of Youth and Special Needs Services, Bridges Library System Education: Master of Library & Information Science from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee School of Information Studies (2008). Bachelor of Arts from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee College of Letters and Science. Major: Sociology, Minor: Communications (2002). How did you become interested in focusing on Health and Wellness?: My professional interest in health and wellness began when I worked at Mental Health America of Wisconsin after I r...
Source: The Cornflower - July 5, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Bobbi Newman Tags: Public Libraries Spotlight Health Literacy health4libs Library memory project Memory Cafes and Libraries public libraries and health Source Type: news

UW-Madison scientists illuminate structures vital to virus replication
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Scientists at the Morgridge Institute for Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have, for the first time, imaged molecular structures vital to how a major class of viruses replicates within infected cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

By far, men garner most coveted speaking slots at virology meetings
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In their recent study, published in the Journal of Virology, the University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers examined 35 years worth of invited speaker rosters from four prominent virology meetings, including the American Society for Virology, which is hosting its annual meeting in Madison, Wisconsin starting June 24, 2017. They found that men were overwhelmingly represented. For example, between 1982 and 2017, 77 percent of the speakers at ASV's annual meetings were male. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 23, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Students in Wisconsin could be expelled for speaking out
Under a new piece of legislation that passed through the Wisconsin State Assembly on Wednesday night, students who disrupt speeches on campus at University of Wisconsin schools could be suspended, or even expelled, for speaking out. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - June 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Investigating emotional spillover in the brain
(Association for Psychological Science) When we let emotions from one event carry on to the next, such spillover can color our impressions and behavior in new situations - sometimes for the worse. Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison are discovering what happens in the brain when such emotional spillover occurs. Their findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Online daters with lots of suitors are less satisfied
Researchers from the University of Wisconsin –Madison believe having lots of potential dates causes people to think of 'what might have been' and go back online for more romantic encounters. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Optimizing feeding is necessary to maintain milk production in organic herds
(Elsevier) Currently, agriculture accounts for approximately 9% of total US greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. By varying diet formulation and the associated crop production to supply the diet, farmers can affect the quantity of GHG emissions of various feeding systems. Therefore, researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison created a study to compare the effects of feeding strategies and the associated crop hectares on GHG emissions of Wisconsin certified organic dairy farms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 15, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news