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Study advances gene therapy for glaucoma
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In a study published today in the scientific journal Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Kaufman and Curtis Brandt, a fellow professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences at UW-Madison, showed an improved tactic for delivering new genes into the eye's fluid drain, called the trabecular meshwork. It could lead to a treatment for glaucoma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Public Library Spotlight: Sue Simenz Title:   Reference Librarian, Brown County Library, Green Bay, WI
Name:  Sue Simenz Title:  Reference Librarian, Brown County Library, Green Bay, WI Education:  BA in Communication Arts (Radio-TV-Film), University of Wisconsin-Madison, MLS, University of Wisconsin-Madison How did you become interested in focusing on Health and Wellness? I’ve been in this job (reference and collection development) for a long time, so I’ve always been cognizant of the need for a quality physical collection and keeping it up to date.  Our health sections get evaluated/weeded more frequently than other areas and I’m doing that for our branches too.  Around 20 years ...
Source: The Cornflower - January 12, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Bobbi Newman Tags: Public Libraries Public Libraries Spotlight Brown County Library Source Type: news

Google Doodle Celebrates Noble Prize-Winning Biochemist Har Gobind Khorana ’s Birthday
Known for his construction of the first synthetic gene and renowned research in nucleic acids and proteins, Indian American biochemist Har Gobind Khorana was honored with a Google Doodle Tuesday. Khorana’s work uncovered how a DNA’s genetic code determines protein synthesis — which dictates how a cell functions. That discovery earned him, along with two colleagues, the 1968 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine “for their interpretation of the genetic code and its function in protein synthesis.” Several years later, Khorana created the first synthetic gene — a step that led to commercial...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - January 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jennifer Calfas Tags: Uncategorized Google onetime Source Type: news

Who Is Har Gobind Khorana? Why Google Is Celebrating the Nobel Prize-Winner
Known for his construction of the first synthetic gene and renowned research in nucleic acids and proteins, Indian American biochemist Har Gobind Khorana is being honored with a Google Doodle Tuesday. Khorana’s work uncovered how a DNA’s genetic code determines protein synthesis — which dictates how a cell functions. That discovery earned him, along with two colleagues, the 1968 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine “for their interpretation of the genetic code and its function in protein synthesis.” Several years later, Khorana created the first synthetic gene — a step that led to comme...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer Calfas Tags: Uncategorized Google Google Doodle onetime Source Type: news

Google Celebrates Nobel-Prize Winning Biochemist Har Gobind Khorana
Indian-American biochemist Har Gobind Khorana, known for his construction of the first synthetic gene and renowned research in nucleic acids and proteins, is being honored with a Google Doodle Tuesday, on what would have been Khorana’s 96th birthday. Khorana’s work uncovered how a DNA’s genetic code determines protein synthesis — which dictates how a cell functions. That discovery earned khorana, along with two colleagues, the 1968 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine “for their interpretation of the genetic code and its function in protein synthesis.” Several years later, Khorana creat...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer Calfas Tags: Uncategorized Google Google Doodle onetime Source Type: news

The Latest: Wisconsin finishing plan to track student deaths
Health officials at the University of Wisconsin say they're finalizing a new database to track the cause of death when students die (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - January 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

New hope for stopping an understudied heart disease in its tracks
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Thanks, in part, to pigs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Arlington Agricultural Research Station, scientists now are catching up on understanding the roots of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

All I Want For Christmas Is A Giant Whale Eye
A giant whale eye spent decades on a strange journey before it finally arrived at an animal eyeball lab and gave the folks there the "best Christmas ever."(Image credit: Richard Dubielzig and Leandro Teixeira/University of Wisconsin-Madison) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

Breaking up (protein complexes) is hard to do, but new UW study shows how
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A new study by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers identified the structural basis for how tightly bound protein complexes are broken apart to become inactivated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Restricting calories can delay aging, says researcher
Dr Rozalyn Anderson, of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, claimed that people are often unaware of the ‘amazing fact’ that wrinkles aren’t inevitable. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pleased to Make Your Acquaintance
Hello everyone!  This is Sam Watson writing as a new Outreach Specialist for the National Library of Medicine-Greater Midwest Region.  I am excited, humbled, and honored to be part of the GMR team and to have the opportunity to work closely with the members of the NNLM. As a late comer to the library field, I’m still grooming my information professional pedigree.  I bring with me an academic librarian instruction and science liaison experience from my time at Knox College and an MLIS degree from my fledgling librarian years at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  My health information focus is th...
Source: The Cornflower - December 13, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Sam Watson Tags: General Source Type: news

Chimpanzee deaths in Uganda pinned on human cold virus
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In the wild, chimpanzees face any number of dire threats, ranging from poachers to predators to deforestation. That's why scientists, investigating an outbreak of respiratory disease in a community of wild chimpanzees in Uganda's Kibale National Park, were surprised and dismayed to discover that a human 'common cold' virus known as rhinovirus C was killing healthy chimps. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Monkeys infected by mosquito bites further Zika virus research
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Monkeys who catch Zika virus through bites from infected mosquitoes develop infections that look like human Zika cases, and may help researchers understand the many ways Zika can be transmitted. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 13, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Estrogen discovery could shed new light on fertility problems
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Estrogen produced in the brain is necessary for ovulation in monkeys, according to researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison who have upended the traditional understanding of the hormonal cascade that leads to release of an egg from the ovaries. Their findings may reveal the cause of some undiagnosed infertility problems and point the way to new methods of birth control. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Number of genetic markers linked to lifespan triples
(University of Connecticut) Researchers at the University of Connecticut, University of Exeter, University of Wisconsin and University of Iowa studied 389,166 volunteers who gave DNA samples to the UK Biobank, US Health and Retirement Study and the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. In addition to confirming the eight genetic variants that had already been linked to longevity, this study found 17 more to expand the list of known variants affecting lifespan to 25 genes, with some sex-specific. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Decades-past logging still threatens spotted owls in national forests
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Logging of the largest trees in the Sierra Nevada's national forests ended in the early 1990s after agreements were struck to protect species' habitat. But new research reported Dec. 6 in the journal Diversity and Distributions by University of Wisconsin-Madison ecologists shows that spotted owls, one of the iconic species logging restrictions were meant to protect, have continued to experience population declines in the forests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 6, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Aging without disease: Scientists have discovered that nervous system function can be restored with proper lifestyle adjustments
(Natural News) A team of researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison reports that thin myelin sheaths are able to restore the impaired nervous system of animals with long life spans and can support its function for years after the onset of a disease. Myelin is a vital insulating sheet or layer wrapping the nerve fibers found in the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Virtual reality users must learn to use what they see
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A UW-Madison study found that when most people put on a virtual reality headset, they still treat what they see like it's happening on any run-of-the-mill TV screen. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Language patterns reveal the body ’s biological response to stress
FINDINGSCertain language patterns track the body ’s molecular response to stress more closely than a person’s own description of the stress, anxiety or depression that they are experiencing.BACKGROUNDPoverty, loneliness or post-traumatic stress disorder can have serious consequences on health, increasing the risk of cancer, Alzheimer ’s disease and heart disease, among other health problems. Previous research has shown that our genes respond to psychological adversity by increasing inflammation and reducing virus-fighting activity. These factors may contribute to social disparities in health.Steve Cole, a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 1, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Video game improves balance in youth with autism
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Playing a video game that rewards participants for holding various " ninja " poses could help children and youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) improve their balance, according to a recent study in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders led by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is the First Bioprinted Heart Just Around the Corner?
A Chicago bioprinting startup that seeks to 3-D print human hearts for transplantation has added to its scientific advisory board of heavy hitters. But its CEO won’t say how close the company is to producing its first viable heart. Biolife4D just announced it has added regenerative biomaterials expert Adam  Feinberg, PhD to lead its scientific advisory team. Feinberg is associate professor of materials science & engineering and biomedical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University and principal investigator of the regenerative biomaterials and therapeutics group. Feinberg uses materials-based engine...
Source: MDDI - November 17, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Cardiovascular Implants Source Type: news

In the heart of devastating outbreak, research team unlocks secrets of Ebola
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In a comprehensive and complex molecular study of blood samples from Ebola patients in Sierra Leone, published today (Nov. 16, 2017) in Cell Host and Microbe, a scientific team led by the University of Wisconsin-Madison has identified signatures of Ebola virus disease that may aid in future treatment efforts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 16, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Helius Medical touts PoNS TBI-treatment trial data despite primary effectiveness miss
Helius Medical Technologies (TSX:HSM) today released results from a registrational trial of its Portable Neuromodulation Stimulator, used to treat patients with chronic balance deficits due to mild-to-moderate traumatic brain injuries, touting positive effects but a missed primary effectiveness endpoint. The Newtown, Penn.-based company’s PONS system is designed to treat neurological symptoms, caused by trauma or disease, non-invasively through the tongue. “We are excited to be on the forefront of research that may bring this novel and exciting therapy to patients in need. The investigators and resear...
Source: Mass Device - November 9, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation Helius Medical Technologies Source Type: news

Breeding highly productive corn has reduced its ability to adapt
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison wanted to know whether the last 100 years of selecting for corn that is acclimated to particular locations has changed its ability to adapt to new or stressful environments. By measuring populations of corn plants planted across North America, they could test how the corn genomes responded to different growing conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 9, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New model reveals possibility of pumping antibiotics into bacteria
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Researchers in the University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Biochemistry have discovered that a cellular pump known to move drugs like antibiotics out of E. coli bacteria has the potential to bring them in as well, opening new lines of research into combating the bacteria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Spacing out after staying up late? Here ’s why
Ever sleep poorly and then walk out of the house without your keys? Or space out while driving to work and nearly hit a stalled car?A new study led by UCLA ’sDr. Itzhak Fried is the first to reveal how sleep deprivation disrupts brain cells ’ ability to communicate with each other. Fried and his colleagues believe that disruption leads to temporary mental lapses that affect memory and visual perception. Their findings are published online today by Nature Medicine.“We discovered that starving the body of sleep also robs neurons of the ability to function properly,” said Fried, the study’s ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 6, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Morgridge, UW scientists explore national security implications of gene editing
(Morgridge Institute for Research) A trio of scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Morgridge Institute for Research participated in an international think tank this month on the intersection of genome editing technology and national security. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study shows how cells can be led down non-cancer path
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) As cells with a propensity for cancer break down food for energy, they reach a fork in the road: They can either continue energy production as healthy cells, or shift to the energy production profile of cancer cells. In a new study, University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers map out the molecular events that direct cells' energy metabolism down the cancerous path. Their findings could lead to ways to interrupt the process. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A little myelin goes a long way to restore nervous system function
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A team of researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison reports that in long-lived animals, renewed but thin myelin sheaths are enough to restore the impaired nervous system and can do so for years after the onset of disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

H7N9 influenza is both lethal and transmissible in animal model for flu
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In 2013, an influenza virus began circulating among poultry in China. It caused several waves of human infection and as of late July 2017, nearly 1,600 people had tested positive for avian H7N9. Nearly 40 percent of those infected had died. In 2017, Yoshihiro Kawaoka of the University of Wisconsin-Madison received a sample of H7N9 virus isolated from a patient in China who had died of the flu. He and his research team subsequently began work to characterize and understand it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Good fathers essential to having healthy, well-balanced children, primate research finds
(Natural News) A recent study published in PLOS ONE has revealed that common marmosets born to responsive fathers have a greater likelihood of surviving during their first 30 days and are more likely to exhibit better weight gain after weaning from their mother’s milk. The study, carried out by a team of researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, focused on... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Autism prevalence and socioeconomic status: What's the connection?
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Children living in neighborhoods where incomes are low and fewer adults have bachelor's degrees are less likely to be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder compared to kids from more affluent neighborhoods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UW wins $7 million grant to wean crops from nitrogen fertilizers
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Florida will use a $7 million grant from the US Department of Energy to study how some plants partner with bacteria to create usable nitrogen and to transfer this ability to the bioenergy crop poplar. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 3, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Stanford, MIT and Harvard top the third annual Reuters Top 100 ranking of the most innovative universities
Stanford University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University top the third annual Reuters Top 100 ranking of the world’s most innovative universities. The Reuters Top 100 aims to identify and rank the educational institutions doing the most to advance science, invent new technologies, and power new markets and industries. Compiled in partnership with Clarivate Analytics, the ranking is based on proprietary data and analysis of numerous indicators including patent filings and research paper citations. The most innovative university in the world, for the third consecutive year, is Stanford Univ...
Source: News from STM - September 29, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Featured World Source Type: news

The Real ‘Special Snowflakes’ In Campus Free-Speech Debates
Many conservatives believe that universities and colleges have become illiberal spaces that stifle free speech. They point to the violent protests at the University of California, Berkeley, that prevented Milo Yiannopoulos from speaking, or the threat of protests that led to the cancelation of Ann Coulter’s appearance at the school. With horror, they recall what happened to Charles Murray at Middlebury College and list examples of coddled students protesting the likes of Condoleezza Rice. All of which reflects, they believe, a broader culture on campuses designed to quarantine students from diverse political opinions...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Eddie S. Glaude, Jr. Tags: Uncategorized campus protests free speech Source Type: news

A flexible new platform for high-performance electronics
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A team of University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers has created the most functional flexible transistor in the world -- and with it, a fast, simple and inexpensive fabrication process that's easily scalable to the commercial level. It's an advance that could open the door to an increasingly interconnected world, enabling manufacturers to add 'smart,' wireless capabilities to any number of large or small products or objects -- like wearable sensors and computers for people and animals -- that curve, bend, stretch and move. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The FDA Is Coming Around to the Idea That Cheese, Microbes, and Mold Can Work Just Fine
Fuzzy ashen mold billows around wheels of cheese stacked on wooden planks at La Ferme de L’Abérieux. Inside its cheese cave nestled in the hills of Cordon, southeastern France, proprietor Albert Bottollier Depois removes one wheel and lowers it to the wide eyes of two children. “Mushrooms,” he says threading his fingers through the cloudy wreath of fungus forming the cheese’s distinctive crust. For a stronger cheese, he’ll even pierce the rind so it seeps in and blooms in the eyes. This is a Tomme de Savoie, one of France’s most distinguished and sought-after cheeses. And yet it h...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Casey Quackenbush / Cordon, France Tags: Uncategorized Cheese Food Safety onetime Source Type: news

New NNLM MAR Health Professions Coordinator
On September 18, Erin Seger joined the staff of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region, as Health Professions Coordinator. Erin has a B.S. in Community Health Education from University of Wisconsin- La Crosse and a newly awarded Master’s in Public Health from University of Illinois- Chicago. She has been a Certified Health Education Specialist since 2009. Most recently, she was a health educator embedded in the Northwestern Memorial Hospital’s Health Learning Center. She has years of outreach, training and health coaching experience. As Health Professions Coordinator, Er...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - September 20, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kate Flewelling Tags: @ the RML Health Professionals Outreach Public Health Source Type: news

See Stunning New Images of Irma and Jose From Space
As if Hurricane Irma’s trail of devastation wasn’t enough, leaving millions without power in Florida and desperation along the Caribbean, Hurricane Jose is following in the storm’s footsteps. We can now watch Irma and Jose’s stunning fury nearly in real time. Researchers and engineers at the Space and Science Engineering Center at University of Wisconsin-Madison stitched together daytime and nighttime imagery for a full, composite picture of the storms, made available to TIME. The images are produced by combining recordings from two satellites. The first satellite is the the new “GOES-16&rdquo...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Pratheek Rebala Tags: Uncategorized hurricane irma hurricane jose Hurricanes interactive studios satellite imagery satellites space Source Type: news

J.J. Watt Got a Hero ’s Welcome in His First Game After Raising Millions for Harvey Relief
Waving the Texas state flag, NFL star J.J. Watt made an emotional return to the field Sunday after raising millions of dollars for the victims of Hurricane Harvey. Watt, the Houston Texans’ star defensive end, emerged as a hero in Texas off the field after Harvey caused catastrophic flooding and destruction in the Lone Star State. In the days after the storm made landfall, Watt created a crowdfunding page to raise money for those impacted by the storm, with a modest goal of $200,000. His fundraising efforts have surpassed $31 million in donations as of Sunday afternoon. For the Houston Texans’ first regular se...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer Calfas Tags: Uncategorized NFL onetime Source Type: news

Funding Award for Simulation Technology in Nursing!
The objectives of this project include: Increase learner access to mobile devices in the Learning Resource Center and Simulation Center. Increase the integration of augmented reality and gaming into simulation activities. Increase access to applications (apps) that support learner success in a simulation environment. (Source: The Cornflower)
Source: The Cornflower - September 6, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Derek Johnson Tags: Funding Technology Source Type: news

Microbes compete for nutrients, affect metabolism, development in mice
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) If our microbiome overindulges, we might not have access to the nutrients we need. That's the suggestion from new research conducted by University of Wisconsin-Madison Professor Federico Rey's group that shows mice that harbor high levels of microbes that eat choline are deprived of this essential nutrient. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Amid environmental change, lakes surprisingly static
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In recent decades, change has defined our environment in the United States. Agriculture intensified. Urban areas sprawled. The climate warmed. Intense rainstorms became more common. But, says a new University of Wisconsin-Madison study, while those kinds of changes usually result in poor water quality, lakes have surprisingly stayed the same. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 23, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New Program Aims to Keep OB/GYNs in Rural America
Women in rural areas of the U.S. often have to travel 30, 60, 90 minutes or more in order to reach a facility with maternity services. A new residency program at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health seeks to address this issue by training obstetrician/gynecologists in rural areas - with the hope they will eventually work there. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - August 19, 2017 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Study: Telehealth increased office visits, had minimal health benefits
A recent study from the University of Wisconsin found that encouraging patients to use online care options increases the number of office visits and phone calls and reduces the number of new patients providers can accept. The reason? These providers feel an added obligation to see those patients in person. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - August 17, 2017 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Now showing: Researchers create first 3-D movie of virus in action
(University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee) Imaging the movement of a virus demonstrates that single-particle X- ray scattering has the potential to shed new light on key molecular processes when paired with powerful new algorithms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 14, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Canary in a coal mine: Survey captures global picture of air pollution's effects on birds
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Writing Aug. 11 in the journal Environmental Research Letters, University of Wisconsin-Madison Professor Tracey Holloway, an expert on air quality, and her former graduate student Olivia Sanderfoot sort through nearly 70 years of the scientific literature to assess the state of knowledge of how air pollution directly affects the health, well-being, reproductive success and diversity of birds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New measure of insulin-making cells could gauge diabetes progression, treatment
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a new measurement for the volume and activity of beta cells, the source of the sugar-regulating hormone insulin. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Attitudes on human genome editing vary, but all agree conversation is necessary
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In a study published Aug. 11 in the journal Science, researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Temple University assessed what people in the United States think about the uses of human genome editing and how their attitudes may drive public discussion. They found a public divided on its uses but united in the importance of moving conversations forward. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news