Fasting AND cutting calories may be key to living longer and staying slim
Researchers from the University of Wisconsin said that while eating in a calorie deficit was good for health - fasting as well as dieting was even better. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Health Care Champions: University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee - Community Champion
When the coronavirus pandemic pushed students into remote learning, the university believed it needed to do more despite some early misgivings about taking on a role in public health. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 15, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Authors: David Schuyler Source Type: news

OB-GYNs Are Disappearing from Wisconsin's Rural Hospitals. A UW Program Trains New Doctors in Small Communities, Hoping They'll Stay.
Highlights a University of Wisconsin-Madison program that places OB-GYN medical school residents at rural hospitals to encourage them to practice in those underserved communities. Describes how the program will help to address the shortage of obstetrics providers in rural areas. UW-Madison hopes to help other universities implement similar programs. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - July 28, 2021 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

UW System to Offer Vaccinated Students $7K Scholarships UW System to Offer Vaccinated Students $7K Scholarships
The University of Wisconsin System plans to offer nearly $500,000 in scholarships this fall to students who have been vaccinated against the coronavirus.Associated Press (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - July 26, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

How Olympians Are Fighting to Put Athletes ’ Mental Health First
Jackson Avenue is the main road that cuts through Oxford, Miss. At its northern limit, it circles the Ole Miss campus where Raven Saunders had spent the past three years as a student athlete. At its western end, Jackson splits into a T junction populated by a cluster of familiar American fast food restaurants and retail chains: a Walmart Supercenter, a Home Depot, a Popeye’s, a Chick-Fil-A. Saunders, a senior at University of Mississippi and a star shot putter on the school’s track and field team, knew the intersection well. Turn right, and the road led home. Turn left, and the highway hugged a steep drop-off f...
Source: TIME: Health - July 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized olympics Tokyo Olympics Source Type: news

Using technology to help informal caregivers manage medication for patients with dementia
(Regenstrief Institute) Regenstrief Institute, Indiana University and University of Wisconsin are creating, with caregivers as co-designers, Helping the Helpers, an application (app) to support informal caregivers (often family or friends) of people with dementia. These caregivers are often under-trained, under-resourced, and under-supported to perform medication management. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 19, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Low-dose radiotherapy combined with immunotherapy eradicates metastatic cancer in mice
(University of Pittsburgh) More doesn't necessarily mean better - including in cancer treatment. University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists report today in Science Translational Medicine that combining targeted radiopharmaceutical therapy with immunotherapy significantly boosts eradication of metastatic cancer in mice, even when the radiation is given in doses too low to destroy the cancer outright. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 14, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Hunting and hidden deaths led to 30% reduction in WI wolf population
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) About 100 additional wolves died over the winter in Wisconsin as a result of the delisting of grey wolves under the Endangered Species Act, alongside the 218 wolves killed by licensed hunters during Wisconsin's first public wolf hunt, according to new research. A majority of these additional, uncounted deaths are due to cryptic poaching, where poachers hide evidence of illegal killings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 5, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Walmart Announces Its Own Brand of Low-Cost Analog Insulin
Walmart Inc. will offer its own brand of analog insulin for people with diabetes, an effort to boost its pharmacy business and counter Amazon.com Inc.’s recent push to sell more medications. The world’s largest retailer will begin selling ReliOn NovoLog this week in its U.S. pharmacies with a prescription, Walmart said in a statement Tuesday. The medicine will cost between 58% and 75% less than the current cash price of branded insulin products for uninsured patients, Walmart said. More than 3 million Walmart customers are diabetic, and the retailer already offers human insulin to them for about $25. But that t...
Source: TIME: Health - June 29, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matthew Boyle and Angelica LaVito / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized Companies wire Source Type: news

Astronomers See Black Hole Swallow Neutron Star For First Time Ever
“It was just a big quick (gulp), gone,” said Patrick Brady, an astrophysicist at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 29, 2021 Category: Science Source Type: news

Counties with state prisons had 11% more first-wave COVID-19 cases
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) The presence of a state prison in a county was associated with 11% more COVID-19 cases through July 1, 2020, according to a new study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 29, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Respiratory Virus Detections Decreased During COVID-19
TUESDAY, June 22, 2021 -- Respiratory virus detections decreased during the COVID-19 pandemic period, according to a research letter published online June 21 in JAMA Internal Medicine. Alexander J. Lepak, M.D., from the University of Wisconsin... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - June 22, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

SARS-CoV-2 infections may trigger antibody responses against multiple virus proteins
(PLOS) All coronaviruses produce four primary structural proteins and multiple nonstructural proteins. However, the majority of antibody-based SARS-CoV-2 research has focused on the spike and nucleocapsid proteins. A study published in PLOS Biology by Anna Heffron, Irene Ong and colleagues at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA, suggests that immune responses may develop against other proteins produced by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Vaccination, previous infection, protect against gamma variant in animal model
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In a new study using variant virus recovered from one of the original travelers, researchers in the US and Japan have found that vaccination with an mRNA vaccine induces antibody responses that would protect humans from infection with the gamma/P.1 variant. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 17, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Polar vortex, winter heat may change bird populations
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Researchers set out to learn how extreme winter cold and heat affected 41 common bird species in eastern North America. They found that individual bird species respond differently to these weather events, and extreme winter heat may lead to longer-term changes in bird populations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 3, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UW researchers investigate mining-related deforestation in the Amazon
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) If you're wearing gold jewelry right now, there's a good chance it came from an illegal mining operation in the tropics and surfaced only after some rainforest was sacrificed, according to a team of University of Wisconsin researchers who studied regulatory efforts to curb some of these environmentally damaging activities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists develop better way to block viruses that cause childhood respiratory infections
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) By engineering a short chunk of protein, or peptide, that can prevent the attachment of human parainfluenza viruses to cells, researchers have improved a method in rodent models intended to help keep children healthy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 10, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Thomas Brock, Whose Discovery Paved the Way for PCR Tests, Dies at 94
In 1966, he found heat-resistant bacteria in a hot spring at Yellowstone National Park. That led to the development of the chemical process behind the coronavirus test. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 23, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Richard Sandomir Tags: Brock, Thomas (1926-2021) Deaths (Obituaries) Microbiology Research Tests (Medical) Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) University of Wisconsin Mullis, Kary B Yellowstone National Park Source Type: news

Disrupted biochemical pathway in the brain linked to bipolar disorder
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In new research, scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have found for the first time that disruptions to a particular protein called Akt can lead to the brain changes characteristic of bipolar disorder. The results offer a foundation for research into treating the often-overlooked cognitive impairments of bipolar disorder, such as memory loss, and add to a growing understanding of how the biochemistry of the brain affects health and disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

These Moms Work as Doctors and Scientists. But They ’ve Also Taken On Another Job: Fighting COVID-19 Misinformation Online
Last March, friends and neighbors began stopping Emily Smith in her town outside of Waco, Texas, with questions about the coronavirus. An epidemiologist at Baylor University, Smith knows all too well how viruses are transmitted. But as the wife of a pastor and as a woman of faith, she also holds a trusted position in her community, and she would speak to those who asked about why she personally thought social distancing was a moral choice. As the weeks wore on, the questions kept coming: “What does flatten the curve mean?” “Is it safe for my child to kick a soccer ball outside with a friend?” So she...
Source: TIME: Health - March 24, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Eliana Dockterman Tags: Uncategorized feature Magazine Misinformation & Disinformation Source Type: news

Vaccination sites increasing in Wisconsin, but shortage remains in short term: Gov. Evers
Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers and acting University of Wisconsin System president Tommy Thompson marked the opening of a community Covid-19 vaccine clinic at UWM but Evers said the clinic is running at less than half of capacity awaiting an influx of doses in a couple weeks. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - March 22, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Rich Kirchen Source Type: news

New method targets disease-causing proteins for destruction
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a way to use a cell's own recycling machinery to destroy disease-causing proteins, a technology that could produce entirely new kinds of drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 18, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers find a better way to measure consciousness
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Millions of people are administered general anesthesia each year in the United States alone, but it's not always easy to tell whether they are actually unconscious. A small proportion of those patients regain some awareness during medical procedures, but a new study of the brain activity that represents consciousness could prevent that potential trauma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 16, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Weakened protections led to more disappearances of endangered Mexican wolves
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Mexican wolves in the American Southwest disappeared more quickly during periods of relaxed legal protections, almost certainly succumbing to poaching, according to new research published Wednesday. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 11, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

COVID-19 Bill Would Fund Genomic Sequencing, Expanding U.S. Ability to Identify Virus Mutations
(WASHINGTON) — U.S. scientists would gain vastly expanded capabilities to identify potentially deadlier coronavirus mutations under legislation advancing in Congress. A House bill headed for floor debate would provide $1.75 billion for genomic sequencing. The U.S. now maps only the genetic makeup of a minuscule fraction of positive virus samples, a situation some experts liken to flying blind. It means the true domestic spread of problematic mutations first identified in the United Kingdom and South Africa remains a matter of guesswork. Such ignorance could prove costly. One worry is that more transmissible forms suc...
Source: TIME: Health - February 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR / AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk wire Source Type: news

New book uncovers cross-dressing in 18th century British lit
(University of Wisconsin Oshkosh)Sapphic Crossings, a new book by the Women's and Gender Studies program director at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, explores why cross-dressing women were popular in 18th century British literature. Ula Lukszo Klein's research for the academic book, available Feb. 4 from the University of Virginia Press, also considers why and how cross-gender appearance signaled lesbian desire to 1700s readers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 3, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SlothBot - Engaging the Public with Robot Ecology
Despite having a professed trust in the science, many members of the public fall short when it comes to making choices that protect the environment and support informed decision-making. To help excite and inspire broad audiences to have a greater appreciation for and engagement with science, our guests today, Jonathan Pauli, associate professor in the Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and Magnus Egerstedt, robotics professor at Georgia Tech, have created SlothBot. The forest-canopy-dwelling robot, which mirrors its biological counterparts in many ways, offers an exciting pla...
Source: AIBS Classifieds - January 27, 2021 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

SlothBot - Engaging the Public with Robot Ecology
Despite having a professed trust in the science, many members of the public fall short when it comes to making choices that protect the environment and support informed decision-making. To help excite and inspire broad audiences to have a greater appreciation for and engagement with science, our guests today, Jonathan Pauli, associate professor in the Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and Magnus Egerstedt, robotics professor at Georgia Tech, have created SlothBot. The forest-canopy-dwelling robot, which mirrors its biological counterparts in many ways, offers an exciting pla...
Source: Education Reports - January 27, 2021 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

SlothBot - Engaging the Public with Robot Ecology
Despite having a professed trust in the science, many members of the public fall short when it comes to making choices that protect the environment and support informed decision-making. To help excite and inspire broad audiences to have a greater appreciation for and engagement with science, our guests today, Jonathan Pauli, associate professor in the Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and Magnus Egerstedt, robotics professor at Georgia Tech, have created SlothBot. The forest-canopy-dwelling robot, which mirrors its biological counterparts in many ways, offers an exciting pla...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - January 27, 2021 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

SlothBot - Engaging the Public with Robot Ecology
Despite having a professed trust in the science, many members of the public fall short when it comes to making choices that protect the environment and support informed decision-making. To help excite and inspire broad audiences to have a greater appreciation for and engagement with science, our guests today, Jonathan Pauli, associate professor in the Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and Magnus Egerstedt, robotics professor at Georgia Tech, have created SlothBot. The forest-canopy-dwelling robot, which mirrors its biological counterparts in many ways, offers an exciting pla...
Source: AIBS News - January 27, 2021 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

SlothBot - Engaging the Public with Robot Ecology
Despite having a professed trust in the science, many members of the public fall short when it comes to making choices that protect the environment and support informed decision-making. To help excite and inspire broad audiences to have a greater appreciation for and engagement with science, our guests today, Jonathan Pauli, associate professor in the Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and Magnus Egerstedt, robotics professor at Georgia Tech, have created SlothBot. The forest-canopy-dwelling robot, which mirrors its biological counterparts in many ways, offers an exciting pla...
Source: Eye on Education - January 27, 2021 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

SlothBot - Engaging the Public with Robot Ecology
Despite having a professed trust in the science, many members of the public fall short when it comes to making choices that protect the environment and support informed decision-making. To help excite and inspire broad audiences to have a greater appreciation for and engagement with science, our guests today, Jonathan Pauli, associate professor in the Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and Magnus Egerstedt, robotics professor at Georgia Tech, have created SlothBot. The forest-canopy-dwelling robot, which mirrors its biological counterparts in many ways, offers an exciting pla...
Source: Washington Watch - January 27, 2021 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

SlothBot - Engaging the Public with Robot Ecology
Despite having a professed trust in the science, many members of the public fall short when it comes to making choices that protect the environment and support informed decision-making. To help excite and inspire broad audiences to have a greater appreciation for and engagement with science, our guests today, Jonathan Pauli, associate professor in the Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and Magnus Egerstedt, robotics professor at Georgia Tech, have created SlothBot. The forest-canopy-dwelling robot, which mirrors its biological counterparts in many ways, offers an exciting pla...
Source: AIBS BioScience Editorials - January 27, 2021 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

UW researchers develop tool to equitably distribute limited vaccines
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Researchers at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and UW Health have developed a tool that incorporates a person's age and socioeconomic status to prioritize vaccine distribution among people who otherwise share similar risks due to their jobs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Population density and virus strains will affect how regions can resume normal life
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) As a new, apparently more transmissible version of the virus that causes COVID-19 has appeared in several countries, new research finds that the transmissibility of viral strains and the population density of a region will play big roles in how vaccination campaigns can help towns and cities return to more normal activities. The findings suggest that directing vaccines toward densely populated counties would help to interrupt transmission of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Covering faces around kids won't mask emotions
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) The proliferation of face coverings to keep COVID-19 in check isn't keeping kids from understanding facial expressions, according to a new study by University of Wisconsin-Madison psychologists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Community conservation reserves protect fish diversity in tropical rivers
(Cornell University) A collaboration between researchers from Cornell University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison has found that small, community-based reserves in Thailand's Salween River Basin are serving as critical refuges for fish diversity in a region whose subsistence fisheries have suffered from decades of overharvesting. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 25, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

William Reznikoff, other MBL affiliates are named fellows of the AAAS
(Marine Biological Laboratory) William S. Reznikoff, senior research scholar at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) and professor emeritus at University of Wisconsin-Madison, has been elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Reznikoff was cited for " deciphering the molecular details of transposition by studying a model bacterial transposon. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 24, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

'Rewiring' metabolism in insulin-producing cells may aid Type 2 diabetes treatment
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Researchers have discovered a previously unknown way that pancreatic cells decide how much insulin to secrete. It could provide a promising new target to develop drugs for boosting insulin production in people with Type 2 diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Covid Infections in Animals Prompt Scientific Concern
Mink in Denmark are not the only animals that could become reservoirs for the coronavirus to spread new mutations to people. (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - November 8, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: James Gorman Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Minks (Animals) Monkeys and Apes Wildlife Sanctuaries and Nature Reserves Genetics and Heredity Vaccination and Immunization Tufts University University of Calgary University of Wisconsin World Health Organization Source Type: news

‘Molecular Signature’ In Blood May Indicate Coronavirus Disease Severity
Physicians in New York teamed up with data scientists at the University of Wisconsin to analyze blood samples from over 100 Covid-19 patients. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - October 22, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Caroline Seydel, Contributor Tags: Healthcare /healthcare Innovation /innovation Science /science Editors' Pick editors-pick Coronavirus Source Type: news

Tommy Thompson pitches mask-wearing in new campaign from business, health coalition
Former Wisconsin Gov. Tommy Thompson, who recently touted the success of the University of Wisconsin System in curbing Covid-19, is the new commercial spokesman for a coalition of business and health care groups urging Wisconsinites to voluntarily wear masks and practice social distancing. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - October 19, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Rich Kirchen Source Type: news

Unraveling the network of molecules that influence COVID-19 severity
(Morgridge Institute for Research) Researchers from the Morgridge Institute for Research, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Albany Medical College have identified more than 200 molecular features that strongly correlate with COVID-19 severity, offering insight into potential treatment options for those with advanced disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 12, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

First relatives of rubella virus discovered in bats in Uganda and mice in Germany
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In a Ugandan forest, a team of American and African scientists take oral swabs from insect-eating cyclops leaf-nosed bats. In a necropsy room near the Baltic Sea, researchers try to determine what killed a donkey, a Bennett's tree-kangaroo and a capybara at a German zoo -- all of them suffering from severe brain swelling. Neither team was aware of the other, yet they were both about to converge on a discovery that would help solve a long-enduring mystery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 7, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Stem cells can repair Parkinson's-damaged circuits in mouse brains
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers demonstrated a proof-of-concept stem cell treatment in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. They found that neurons derived from stem cells can integrate well into the correct regions of the brain, connect with native neurons and restore motor functions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New vaccine strategy harnesses 'foot soldier' T-cells to protect against influenza
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) As Americans begin pulling up their sleeves for an annual flu vaccine, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have provided new insights into an alternative vaccine approach that provides broader protection against seasonal influenza. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 22, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

‘Best’ hospitals should be required to deliver tobacco treatment
AUCLA-led report published today in the  Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine exposes what the authors call a weakness in the high-profile “Best Hospitals Honor Roll” published annually by U.S. News& World Report.The data used to compile the rankings are collected from multiple sources, including outcomes reported to the Joint Commission, an accreditation agency. Every three years, hospitals are required to complete a comprehensive review by the Joint Commission to earn or maintain accreditation. None of the top 20 hospitals in the 2020 –21 U.S. News rankings re...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 21, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

New national imaging center has potential to transform medicine
(Morgridge Institute for Research) A national research initiative announced today will place the University of Wisconsin-Madison at the forefront of a revolution in imaging fostered by cryo-electron microscopy and cryo-electron tomography -- technologies that can illuminate life at the atomic scale. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 21, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The Latest: Wisconsin university eliminates spring break
The University of Wisconsin-Madison has decided to eliminate spring break next semester in an effort to curb the spread of the coronavirus (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - September 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

US stay-at-home orders slowed the spread of coronavirus
The time it took for COVID-19 case numbers to double increased from 2.7 days to six days after stay-home advisories or orders were issued in 42 states, a new University of Wisconsin study shows. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news