Training compassion 'muscle' may boost brain's resilience to others' suffering
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A new study suggests that as little as two weeks of compassion meditation training -- intentionally cultivating positive wishes to understand and relieve the suffering of others -- may reduce the distress a person feels when witnessing another's suffering. The findings may have implications for professions in which people routinely work with others who are suffering, like doctors, law enforcement officers and first responders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Synchronizing cochlear signals stimulates brain to 'hear' in stereo
(Acoustical Society of America) Using both ears to hear increases speech recognition and improves sound localization. Ruth Litovsky, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, wants to bring this advantage to people who use cochlear implants. During the 175th ASA Meeting, Litovsky will present data showing a new technique that synchronizes the cochlear signals that stimulate the brain in a way that is similar to people who can hear normally. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Metastasis enablers: Findings could unlock new ovarian cancer treatments
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) New research from the lab of Pamela Kreeger, a University of Wisconsin-Madison biomedical engineering professor, has identified one way ovarian cancer cells appear to successfully spread. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

CWD prions discovered in Wisconsin soils for the first time
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) New research out of the University of Wisconsin-Madison has, for the first time, detected prions responsible for chronic wasting disease (CWD) in samples taken from sites where deer congregate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 3, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

#HopeActLiveWI: Grant Award to Support Addiction Treatment
The Department of Health Services (DHS) has awarded a $500,000 annual grant to the University of Wisconsin System to provide doctors real-time guidance on how to treat patients who may have an addiction. The addiction consultation line is part of the Heroin, Opioid, Prevention, and Education (HOPE) legislative package. “This effort will enhance care to patients with addictions in all regions of the state – north to south, east to west, rural, suburban, and urban – through the promotion of...(see release) (Source: Wisconsin DHFS Press Releases)
Source: Wisconsin DHFS Press Releases - April 26, 2018 Category: Hospital Management Authors: millejcodn Source Type: news

Researchers' wearable measures force athletes put on tendons
Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison have detailed a wearable device that can better measure muscle-tendon tension during certain activities, such as walking or running. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - April 26, 2018 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

NASA says that aliens live on Venus, but they're only microbes
(Natural News) The cloudy planet dubbed the “Morning Star” and “Evening Star” could be harboring alien life. A NASA-backed international study surmises that there could be simple but sturdy bacteria floating in the uppermost clouds of Venus, reported The Sun. Study author Sanjay Limaye of the University of Wisconsin-Madison says that computer models of Venus suggest it used to... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Future wearable device could tell how we power human movement
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) For athletes and weekend warriors alike, returning from a tendon injury too soon often ensures a trip right back to physical therapy. However, a new technology developed by University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers could one day help tell whether your tendons are ready for action. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Swarms Of Tiny Sea Creatures Are Powerful Enough To Mix Oceans, Study Finds
Each night, the organisms gather in a "vertical stampede" to feed at the ocean's surface. Research suggests the columns of swimming animals can create large downward jets that help churn the waters.(Image credit: Isabel Houghton / J.R. Strickler /courtesy of Stanford / University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rebecca Hersher Source Type: news

Research and Innovation director named for Mayo Clinic Health System in northwest Wisconsin
EAU CLAIRE, Wis. ? Internationally known Mayo Clinic physician-scientist and University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire alumnus, Timothy J. Nelson, M.D., Ph.D., has been named the director of Research and Innovation for Mayo Clinic Health System in northwest Wisconsin. The newly created position will support collaboration between Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and Mayo Clinic Health System. [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - April 4, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

The Scientific Reason Boot Camp Workouts Are So Good For You
Boot camp-style workouts have been around for decades. But now they come in many shapes and flavors—from bridal boot camps designed to tone people up for their nuptials to “prison-style workouts” taught by people who were formerly incarcerated. Yet most boot camps share a few important things in common. They combine a series of calisthenics, like pushups, lunges and squats, with running, jumps and other high-intensity aerobic movements that are modeled loosely on military methods for whipping new recruits into shape. Most use forms of body-weight training, but some incorporate equipment—whether real...
Source: TIME: Health - April 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness healthytime Source Type: news

Researchers Say Venus ’ Atmosphere Could Support Extraterrestrial Life
It’s not likely that you’ll ever be offered the opportunity to visit Venus. But on the odd chance you are, you might want to decline. The temperature on the surface of the planet is around 870° F (465° C)—hot enough to melt lead—and the atmospheric pressure at Venusian sea level (not that there are any seas) is 92 times what it is on Earth. But if it’s unlikely you — or any other organism — could survive on the surface of Venus, it’s possible things could be very different up in the Venusian clouds. According to a new study published in the journal Astrobiology, the t...
Source: TIME: Science - April 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized atmosphere Bacteria exobiology Life NASA space Venus Source Type: news

Is there life adrift in the clouds of Venus?
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In the search for extraterrestrial life, scientists have turned over all sorts of rocks. Mars, for example, has geological features that suggest it once had -- and still has -- subsurface liquid water. Scientists have also eyed Saturn's moons as well as Jupiter's as possible havens for life in the oceans under their icy crusts. Now, however, scientists are dusting off an old idea that promises a new vista in the hunt for life beyond Earth: the clouds of Venus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

See which counties lead the state for health outcomes
In a ranking of the counties in the state by health outcomes, results for nine southwestern Pennsylvania counties were a mixed bag, with one county in the top 10, three in the top 25 and three in the bottom 10. The study by County Health Rankings& Roadmaps, a collaboration between The Robert Wood  Johnson Foundation and the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute, ranks counties by both health outcomes and health factors. The slideshow is ranked by health outcomes — composed of length… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - March 16, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Ethan Lott Source Type: news

Improved capture of cancer cells in blood could help track disease
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) New research by University of Wisconsin-Madison Professor of Pharmacy Seungpyo Hong and his collaborators builds on several years of work in isolating circulating tumor cells, or CTCs, by demonstrating improved methods for their capture on clinical samples for the first time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Live in Pennsylvania? Here's how healthy your county is
Both the healthiest and least healthiest county in Pennsylvania are, once again, in the southeastern portion of the state, according to a report released Wednesday by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute. The ninth annual County Health Rankings showed Chester County was the healthiest county in the state; Philadelphia was the least healthy. Both counties held those same distinctions in last year’s study. The study looks at medical care… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - March 14, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: John George Source Type: news

Milwaukee County's economic disparities contribute to low health rankings
Milwaukee County continues to rank among the least healthiest in the state and, it turns out, is adjacent to the healthiest Wisconsin county. That’s according to the ninth annual County Health Rankings report, which is a collaboration of the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Rankings are available at www.countyhealthrankings.org.  The report finds Milwaukee County ranking 71 st, or second to last, in both health outcomes and health factors.… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - March 13, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: David Schuyler Source Type: news

Milwaukee County's economic disparities contribute to low health rankings
Milwaukee County continues to rank among the least healthiest in the state and, it turns out, is adjacent to the healthiest Wisconsin county. That’s according to the ninth annual County Health Rankings report, which is a collaboration of the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Rankings are available at www.countyhealthrankings.org.  The report finds Milwaukee County ranking 71 st, or second to last, in both health outcomes and health factors.… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 13, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: David Schuyler Source Type: news

More homes built near wild lands leading to greater wildfire risk
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) New research out of the University of Wisconsin-Madison shows that a flurry of homebuilding near wild areas since 1990 has greatly increased the number of homes at risk from wildfires while increasing the costs associated with fighting those fires in increasingly dense developments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Helmet use associated with reduced risk of cervical spine injury during motorcycle crashes
(Journal of Neurosurgery Publishing Group) Despite claims that helmets do not protect the cervical spine during a motorcycle crash and may even increase the risk of injury, researchers from the University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics in Madison found that, during an accident, helmet use lowers the likelihood of cervical spine injury (CSI), particularly fractures of the cervical vertebrae. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Focus Group for Public Library Workers
The National Network of Libraries of Medicine and the Public Library Association are continuing to partner with an opportunity for public library staff, both professional and paraprofessional, to participate in virtual focus groups this spring. The purpose of the research is to better understand the challenges and rewards of providing health information in public libraries. We are interested in library workers’ questions, experiences, concerns and success stories – it’s all useful to us! The focus groups will happen by telephone and will last 1.5 hours; we are scheduling on all days of the week except Sun...
Source: Dragonfly - March 5, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Carolyn Martin Tags: News from NNLM Public Libraries Source Type: news

UCLA pediatrician inspires humanism in young doctors
Dr. Lee Miller ’s journey began, as many do, with a train ride. Thirty years ago, he was a UCLA assistant professor traveling from Philadelphia to New York. After threading his way through the crowded aisles of every car, he eyed the last three vacant seats in the caboose.“I chose a fortuitous seat next to an elderly gentleman from Shanghai,” Miller recalled recently in a special address to UCLA medical students. “He was a pediatrician teaching students, just like me.”The ride passed quickly as the older physician recounted stories about his work in global health. When the two exchanged busine...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 3, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Focus Group Invitation for Public Library Workers
This focus group is part of our ongoing partnership with the Public Library Association. We are looking for public library workers to participate in virtual focus groups this spring. We’re looking for both paraprofessional and professional library workers. Would you or anyone on your staff be interested in participating? The purpose of the research is to understand better the challenges and rewards of providing health information in public libraries. We are interested in library workers’ questions, experiences, concerns and success stories – it’s all useful to us! The focus groups will happen by tel...
Source: The Cornflower - March 2, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Bobbi Newman Tags: Public Libraries Source Type: news

Smiles aren't all they're cracked up to be, study finds
Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison found that judgmental smirks increase people's heart rates, whereas teeth-baring smiles trigger less of a stress response. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New brain-healing bracelet uses vibration to help stroke victims recover faster
(Natural News) A new brain-healing bracelet that uses vibration is being used to help speed the recovery of stroke victims. Known as TheraBracelet, the new device was developed by a group of scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. The scientists tested the device on 10 individuals and found that the application of the vibrations at... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

They grin, you bear it -- research reveals physical impact of a smile
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Research led by Jared Martin, a psychology graduate student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, shows that smiles meant to convey dominance are associated with a physical reaction -- a spike in stress hormones -- in their targets. On the other hand, smiles intended as a reward, to reinforce behavior, appear to physically buffer recipients against stress. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Anesthesia may cause memory problems
Researchers at The University of Wisconsin-Madison linked anesthesia with a slight decline in memory. The findings were published in the journal Anaesthesia. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

You Asked: Should I Exercise When I ’m Sick?
If you want to protect yourself from colds and flu, regular exercise may be the ultimate immunity-booster. Studies have shown that moderate aerobic exercise—around 30 to 45 minutes a day of activities like walking, biking or running—can more than halve your risk for respiratory infections and other common winter maladies. There’s some evidence that very intense exercise—running a marathon, say—can briefly suppress your immune function, says Dr. Bruce Barrett, a professor of family medicine at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. But in general, physical activity is...
Source: TIME: Health - February 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness healthytime Source Type: news

The new bioenergy research center: building on ten years of success
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) The Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC), led by the University of Wisconsin-Madison, recently embarked on a new mission: to develop sustainable alternatives to transportation fuels and products currently derived from petroleum. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Birds and beans: Study shows best coffee for bird diversity
(Wildlife Conservation Society) It's an age-old debate for coffee lovers. Which is better: Arabica beans with their sweeter, softer taste, or the bold, deep flavor of Robusta beans? A new study by WCS, Princeton University, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison appearing in the journal Scientific Reports has taken the question to unlikely coffee aficionados: birds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 16, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New approaches in neuroscience show it's not all in your head
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Our own unique experiences shape how we view the world and respond to the events in our lives. But experience is highly subjective. These differences can matter, especially as a growing body of research shows that our thoughts about and interpretations of our experiences can have physical consequences in our brains and bodies, says University of Wisconsin-Madison Center for Healthy Minds founder and director Richard Davidson, in a talk titled: How the Mind Informs the Brain: Depression and Well-Being. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

DataFlash: Data Horror Stories
In the spirit of Love Data Week’s 2018 theme, Data Stories, it’s important to consider cautionary tales as well as good outcomes. We should, after all, learn from our mistakes. Perhaps the best known collection of data horror stories is Dorothea Salo’s Research Data Management Horror Stories pinboard. Dorothea, a University of Wisconsin academic librarian and library-school instructor, has been pinning data tales of woe since 2010. We probably all have our own personal examples of data hell, but here are a few of my favorite themes… Submitting a grant proposal and neglecting to include a well thou...
Source: Dragonfly - February 15, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Ann Madhavan Tags: Data Science Data_Science Source Type: news

Immune system dysfunction may occur early in Alzheimer's disease
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) An association between inflammation biomarkers in both blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) associated pathology, has been found by researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus working with the University of Wisconsin Alzheimer's Disease Research Center and the University of California San Francisco Memory and Aging Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Urban foxes and coyotes learn to set aside their differences and coexist
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Diverging from centuries of established behavioral norms, red fox and coyote have gone against their wild instincts and learned to coexist in the urban environment of Madison and the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus, according to a recently published study in the journal PLOS ONE. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study advances gene therapy for glaucoma
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In a study published today in the scientific journal Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Kaufman and Curtis Brandt, a fellow professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences at UW-Madison, showed an improved tactic for delivering new genes into the eye's fluid drain, called the trabecular meshwork. It could lead to a treatment for glaucoma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Public Library Spotlight: Sue Simenz Title:   Reference Librarian, Brown County Library, Green Bay, WI
Name:  Sue Simenz Title:  Reference Librarian, Brown County Library, Green Bay, WI Education:  BA in Communication Arts (Radio-TV-Film), University of Wisconsin-Madison, MLS, University of Wisconsin-Madison How did you become interested in focusing on Health and Wellness? I’ve been in this job (reference and collection development) for a long time, so I’ve always been cognizant of the need for a quality physical collection and keeping it up to date.  Our health sections get evaluated/weeded more frequently than other areas and I’m doing that for our branches too.  Around 20 years ...
Source: The Cornflower - January 12, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Bobbi Newman Tags: Public Libraries Public Libraries Spotlight Brown County Library Source Type: news

Google Doodle Celebrates Noble Prize-Winning Biochemist Har Gobind Khorana ’s Birthday
Known for his construction of the first synthetic gene and renowned research in nucleic acids and proteins, Indian American biochemist Har Gobind Khorana was honored with a Google Doodle Tuesday. Khorana’s work uncovered how a DNA’s genetic code determines protein synthesis — which dictates how a cell functions. That discovery earned him, along with two colleagues, the 1968 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine “for their interpretation of the genetic code and its function in protein synthesis.” Several years later, Khorana created the first synthetic gene — a step that led to commercial...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - January 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jennifer Calfas Tags: Uncategorized Google onetime Source Type: news

Who Is Har Gobind Khorana? Why Google Is Celebrating the Nobel Prize-Winner
Known for his construction of the first synthetic gene and renowned research in nucleic acids and proteins, Indian American biochemist Har Gobind Khorana is being honored with a Google Doodle Tuesday. Khorana’s work uncovered how a DNA’s genetic code determines protein synthesis — which dictates how a cell functions. That discovery earned him, along with two colleagues, the 1968 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine “for their interpretation of the genetic code and its function in protein synthesis.” Several years later, Khorana created the first synthetic gene — a step that led to comme...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer Calfas Tags: Uncategorized Google Google Doodle onetime Source Type: news

Google Celebrates Nobel-Prize Winning Biochemist Har Gobind Khorana
Indian-American biochemist Har Gobind Khorana, known for his construction of the first synthetic gene and renowned research in nucleic acids and proteins, is being honored with a Google Doodle Tuesday, on what would have been Khorana’s 96th birthday. Khorana’s work uncovered how a DNA’s genetic code determines protein synthesis — which dictates how a cell functions. That discovery earned khorana, along with two colleagues, the 1968 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine “for their interpretation of the genetic code and its function in protein synthesis.” Several years later, Khorana creat...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer Calfas Tags: Uncategorized Google Google Doodle onetime Source Type: news

The Latest: Wisconsin finishing plan to track student deaths
Health officials at the University of Wisconsin say they're finalizing a new database to track the cause of death when students die (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - January 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

New hope for stopping an understudied heart disease in its tracks
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Thanks, in part, to pigs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Arlington Agricultural Research Station, scientists now are catching up on understanding the roots of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

All I Want For Christmas Is A Giant Whale Eye
A giant whale eye spent decades on a strange journey before it finally arrived at an animal eyeball lab and gave the folks there the "best Christmas ever."(Image credit: Richard Dubielzig and Leandro Teixeira/University of Wisconsin-Madison) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

Breaking up (protein complexes) is hard to do, but new UW study shows how
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A new study by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers identified the structural basis for how tightly bound protein complexes are broken apart to become inactivated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Restricting calories can delay aging, says researcher
Dr Rozalyn Anderson, of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, claimed that people are often unaware of the ‘amazing fact’ that wrinkles aren’t inevitable. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pleased to Make Your Acquaintance
Hello everyone!  This is Sam Watson writing as a new Outreach Specialist for the National Library of Medicine-Greater Midwest Region.  I am excited, humbled, and honored to be part of the GMR team and to have the opportunity to work closely with the members of the NNLM. As a late comer to the library field, I’m still grooming my information professional pedigree.  I bring with me an academic librarian instruction and science liaison experience from my time at Knox College and an MLIS degree from my fledgling librarian years at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  My health information focus is th...
Source: The Cornflower - December 13, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Sam Watson Tags: General Source Type: news

Chimpanzee deaths in Uganda pinned on human cold virus
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In the wild, chimpanzees face any number of dire threats, ranging from poachers to predators to deforestation. That's why scientists, investigating an outbreak of respiratory disease in a community of wild chimpanzees in Uganda's Kibale National Park, were surprised and dismayed to discover that a human 'common cold' virus known as rhinovirus C was killing healthy chimps. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Monkeys infected by mosquito bites further Zika virus research
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Monkeys who catch Zika virus through bites from infected mosquitoes develop infections that look like human Zika cases, and may help researchers understand the many ways Zika can be transmitted. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 13, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Estrogen discovery could shed new light on fertility problems
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Estrogen produced in the brain is necessary for ovulation in monkeys, according to researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison who have upended the traditional understanding of the hormonal cascade that leads to release of an egg from the ovaries. Their findings may reveal the cause of some undiagnosed infertility problems and point the way to new methods of birth control. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Number of genetic markers linked to lifespan triples
(University of Connecticut) Researchers at the University of Connecticut, University of Exeter, University of Wisconsin and University of Iowa studied 389,166 volunteers who gave DNA samples to the UK Biobank, US Health and Retirement Study and the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. In addition to confirming the eight genetic variants that had already been linked to longevity, this study found 17 more to expand the list of known variants affecting lifespan to 25 genes, with some sex-specific. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Decades-past logging still threatens spotted owls in national forests
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Logging of the largest trees in the Sierra Nevada's national forests ended in the early 1990s after agreements were struck to protect species' habitat. But new research reported Dec. 6 in the journal Diversity and Distributions by University of Wisconsin-Madison ecologists shows that spotted owls, one of the iconic species logging restrictions were meant to protect, have continued to experience population declines in the forests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 6, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news