PURE Confusion: Observational Data Can't Tell Us What to Eat PURE Confusion: Observational Data Can't Tell Us What to Eat
The PURE study suggests that dietary saturated fat is good and carbohydrates bad, but nutritional guidelines should be based purely on randomized data, argues Dr O ' Donoghue.theheart.org on Medscape (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - October 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Commentary Source Type: news

Fatty diet may boost risk of relapse in kids with multiple sclerosis
(BMJ) A fatty diet may boost the risk of a relapse in kids with multiple sclerosis (MS) by as much as 56 per cent, with saturated fat associated with a tripling in risk, suggests research published online in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery& Psychiatry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fried foods? Use THIS oil.
You’ve probably heard some very confusing advice about which cooking oils are best for your health. Almost every time you read an article or watch a health show on TV, someone is recommending some good-for-you grease that’s somehow better, less cancer-causing, more antioxidant-rich, less (or sometimes more) fatty than the last. The problem begins with doctors and nutritionists — and Big Food — who like to classify cooking oils by categories of fat, claiming that one category is “good” and another is “bad.” Don’t listen to them. We already know that mainstream medicine and moder...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 4, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Nutrition Cancer cooking fat food oil Source Type: news

QUIZ: Should You Eat This or That?
For decades, fat has been vilified as the worst part of the American diet. Scientists made their case, the government codified it with nutritional guidelines, and industry launched a fat-free food frenzy that hasn’t abated. But in those 40 years, people got sicker—and fatter. The new science shows fat isn’t the reason, and in fact, the nutrient might deserve even more room on our plates. Overall, the latest science on weight and dieting shows that there’s likely no one-size-fits-all approach and that people can succeed at achieving better health through a wide variety of ways—and foods. Still,...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Time Tags: Uncategorized chocolate cookies diet Diet/Nutrition fat free fattening food Food Facts health healthy food low fat photography saturated fat what to eat Source Type: news

Study allows establishing a timeline of obesity
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) In experiments with mice, a Brazilian research group showed that, well before the profile of intestinal bacteria gets altered, a diet rich in saturated fats damages the hypothalamus -- region of the brain responsible for optimizing the organism's absorption of nutrients -- because its cells react to the excess of fat in the bloodstream as if they were fighting pathogens. According to the research, the ensuing process of inflammation and methabolic disbalance can recede through a diet with low levels of saturated fat and simple carbohydrates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Avoid eating just before your bedtime, study recommends
Conclusions Previous research suggests we may be better off consuming more of our calories earlier on in the day, when we have a full, active day ahead of us to use up the energy. It's also been observed that people who consume large calorific meals late in the evening can have a higher body weight. In a sense, the results of this study seem plausible and don't really say anything different from what's already been observed. But as this is a cross-sectional study, it can't really prove very much. The study involved a small, select sample of US university students. Their results can't be applied to everyone, as they have di...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Source Type: news

UCLA faculty voice: A healthy lifestyle can help prevent dementia
UCLAJonathan FieldingDr. Jonathan Fielding is a distinguished professor of public health and pediatrics at UCLA. This column appeared in U.S. News and World Report.Does behavior have a significant impact on your risk of developing dementia? That ’s what a wealth of new data is suggesting, and the evidence, gathered from different research teams around the globe, is pointing in the same intriguing direction.A suite of new studies came to a common finding — that our own behavior could partially stave off the effects of dementia, including dementia-related to Alzheimer’s, which accounts for up to 75 percent of cases, ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 8, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

The Guardian view on veganism: high in moral fibre | Editorial
Vegans are often unfairly mocked. They should instead be praisedJeremy Corbyn is “going through the process” of eating more vegan food, he has said – he just has to bring himself to give up the brie, verboten under vegan rules, along with eggs, milk and everything animals produce. Later, as if fearful of a backlash, his spokesperson issued a statement denying he was vegan. But the Labour leader was right to be proud of his efforts. Vegans are often unreasonably mocked as do-gooders and sniped at for making dinner parties awkward for those who don’t like lentils quite so much. This is unfair: the diet does do the wo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: Veganism Life and style Food Environment Food science Source Type: news

One in 10 men aged 50 'have the heart of a 60-year-old'
"One-tenth of 50-year-old men have a heart age 10 years older than they are," BBC News reports. This is the finding of an analysis of 1.2 million people who used the NHS Heart Age Test. The principle behind the test is that you can "age" your heart through unhealthy behaviour such as smoking and being obese. Underlying conditions like high blood pressure and high cholesterol, which often have no noticeable symptoms, can also age the heart. An obese smoker in their 50s who has high blood pressure and high cholesterol could have the heart of a 60- or 70-year-old. The quick and simple test tells you the...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Source Type: news

Cholesterol diet: Eating more of THESE fats could ward off obesity
CHOLESTEROL - and increased risk of health problems related to obesity - could be reduced by eating more unsaturated fat, and less saturated fat, say scientists. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - August 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

HealthWatch: A New Gene Therapy For Leukemia; A Study On Carbohydrates
This study does not mean you can now eat a ton of butter and steak without worry, but you probably don’t need to feel guilty about eating some fat. In terms of carbohydrates, the study did not distinguish between refined carbs and complex carbs, so further study is needed. (Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire)
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Healthwatch Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Cancer Research Dr. Mallika Marshall Leukemia Source Type: news

Results of global fats and carbs study not very relevant for UK
Conclusion The results of the study have been presented in the media as if they overturn all current dietary guidelines. In the UK at least, that is completely misleading. The study results support the UK guidelines, having found that people who get around 50% of their calories from carbohydrates and 35% from fat, as recommended by Public Health England, were likely to live the longest. There are some limitations to the study, not least that observational studies cannot prove cause and effect. For example, the very low fat and high carbohydrate levels of diets found among some participants in the study might simply repres...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Source Type: news

Study examines dietary fats' impact on healthy, obese adults
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) Metabolically healthy obese adults consuming a diet high in unsaturated fat and low in saturated fat may be able to decrease their total cholesterol by 10 points, a new study suggests. However, there was little research evidence to support current dietary recommendations that replacing saturated fat with unsaturated fat aids in weight loss, the researchers also reported. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

PURE Shakes Up Nutritional Field: Finds High Fat Intake Beneficial PURE Shakes Up Nutritional Field: Finds High Fat Intake Beneficial
The new study of dietary habits in 135,000 people around the world found that high fat intake, including saturated fat, was associated with a reduced risk of mortalityMedscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

What Do You Tell Your Patients About Saturated Fats? What Do You Tell Your Patients About Saturated Fats?
Although some medical groups recommend steering clear of saturated fats, not all experts agree.Medscape Reader Polls (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news