Avidity Biosciences Appoints Joseph Baroldi as Chief Operating Officer
SAN DIEGO, Feb. 12, 2020 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Avidity Biosciences, Inc. (Avidity), a privately-held biotechnology company pioneering Antibody Oligonucleotide Conjugates (AOCs™), announced today the appointment of Joseph Baroldi as ... Biopharmaceuticals, Personnel Avidity Biosciences, Antibody-Oligonucleotide Conjugates, muscular dystrophy (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - February 12, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Stressed At Work? Keeping A Plant On Your Desk Can Help, Study Finds
This study verified the stress-reducing effect of gazing intentionally at a plant for a few minutes and actively engaging in the care of it in a real office setting when an employee felt fatigued. The results suggest that if employers provided active encouragement for workers to take three minute “nature breaks,” the mental health of their employees would improve, said Dr. Masahiro Toyoda, lead author of the study and professor at the University of Hyogo, where he specializes in horticultural therapy. The study is the “latest of those that continue to point out that plants are beneficial to humans,”...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Offbeat Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Source Type: news

AHA News: Expert Heart Advice for Rare Genetic Muscle Disorder
THURSDAY, Feb. 6, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- A rare, inherited muscle disorder that occurs in about 1 in 8,000 people, myotonic dystrophy also can affect the heart and other organs. A new set of expert recommendations offers guidance... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 6, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Janssen to Highlight Depth of Solid Tumor Portfolio at ASCO GU
RARITAN, N.J., February 3, 2020 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson announced today multiple data presentations from a robust solid tumor portfolio that will be featured at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary (ASCO GU) Cancers Symposium, taking place February 13-15 in San Francisco. Company-sponsored data presentations will include clinical results for ERLEADA® (apalutamide) and niraparib in prostate cancer; and BALVERSA™ (erdafitinib) in bladder cancer. “We are committed to improving outcomes in patients with prostate and bladder cancer where high unmet...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - February 3, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

'I trust you': How a Lancaster family helped lay the building blocks for gene-therapy breakthroughs at Nationwide Children ’s
Andrew is the “And” in Andelyn Biosciences. He was 3 in 2001 when he was diagnosed with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the most common and among the most aggressive forms of the inherited condition. Patients usually don’t reach 20. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 30, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Carrie Ghose Source Type: news

Six patients with rare blood disease are doing well after gene therapy clinical trial
UCLA researchers are part of an international team that reported the use of a stem cell gene therapy to treat nine people with the rare, inherited blood disease known as X-linked chronic granulomatous disease, or X-CGD. Six of those patients are now in remission and have stopped other treatments. Before now, people with X-CGD – which causes recurrent infections, prolonged hospitalizations for treatment, and a shortened lifespan – had to rely on bone marrow donations for a chance at remission.“With this gene therapy, you can use a patient’s own stem cells instead of donor cells for a transplant,&rdqu...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 28, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Sympathetic Nervous System Influences Development and Tissue Maintenance, Mouse Research Suggests
New research funded in part by NCCIH suggests that stress-induced hair graying in mice may be an accessible model to investigate how stress influences tissue regeneration. Read about it here. (Source: NCCAM Featured Content)
Source: NCCAM Featured Content - January 27, 2020 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: NCCIH Source Type: news

Gene scissors against incurable muscular disease
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) Duchenne type muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common hereditary muscular disease among children, leaving them wheelchair-bound before the age of twelve and reducing life expectancy. Researchers at Technical University of Munich (TUM), Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich (LMU) and the German Research Center for Environmental Health (Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen) have developed a gene therapy that may provide permanent relief for those suffering from DMD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Link Between Stress And Hair Turning Prematurely Gray Revealed In Harvard Study
(CNN) — Marie Antoinette’s hair suddenly turned white before the ill-fated French queen was taken to the guillotine to have her head chopped off, according to some historical accounts. More modern reports refer to hair turning prematurely white in survivors of bomb attacks during World War II, while an Australian airline pilot saw his hair go gray in the months after landing a plane following a failure of all four engines in the early 1980s. While there’s been plenty of anecdotal evidence suggesting premature graying can be caused by extreme stress — whether this is true and how this happens isn&rsq...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health CNN Harvard University Source Type: news

Scientists Confirm That Stress Can Indeed Turn Hair Grey
When Ya-Chieh Hsu, professor of stem cell and regenerative biology at Harvard University and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, wanted to figure out exactly what makes hair turn grey, she started with an obvious, albeit anecdotal, culprit: stress. There are well-known historical examples of the connection between stress and hair greying—Marie Antoinette’s coif reportedly blanched after she was captured during the French Revolution—and studies have even linked stress in animals to greying hair. But for the first time, Hsu and her colleagues figured out the biological reason why stress saps the pigment out of...
Source: TIME: Health - January 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized grey hair Stress Source Type: news

Night-time shift work and related stress responses: a study on security guards - Cannizzaro E, Cirrincione L, Mazzucco W, Scorciapino A, Catalano C, Ramaci T, Ledda C, Plescia F.
Work-related stress can induce a break in homeostasis by placing demands on the body that are met by the activation of two different systems, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the sympathetic nervous system. Night-shift work alters the body's exp... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news

Heart-function protein may help muscular dystrophy patients live longer
(Rutgers University) Rutgers-led discovery may help prevent muscular dystrophy-related heart disease, the leading cause of death in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 14, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Carnegie Mellon leverages AI to give voice to the voiceless
(Carnegie Mellon University) Refugees are often the target of hate speech on social media, but researchers at Carnegie Mellon University are now leveraging artificial intelligence to identify and highlight sympathetic and supportive social media posts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Attenuated cardiovascular responses to the cold pressor test in concussed collegiate athletes - Johnson BD, Sackett JR, Schlader ZJ, Leddy JJ.
CONTEXT: Cardiovascular responses to the cold pressor test (CPT) provide information regarding sympathetic function. OBJECTIVE: To determine if recently concussed collegiate athletes had blunted cardiovascular responses during the CPT. DESI... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

The impact of gun violence on those already dying: perspectives from a palliative care physician - Vente TM.
The consult was for a 19-year-old man with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who was in the ICU with respiratory distress and weight loss. Given his degenerative disease, establishing care with the palliative care team made perfect sense. It was, by all mean... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

Smart algorithm finds possible future treatment for childhood cancer
(Uppsala University) Using a computer algorithm, scientists at Uppsala University have identified a promising new treatment for neuroblastoma. This form of cancer in children, which occurs in specialised nerve cells in the sympathetic nervous system, may be life-threatening. In the long term the discovery, described in the latest issue of the scientific journal Nature Communications, may result in a new form of treatment for children in whom the disease is severe or at an advanced stage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 7, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Biotech firm makes $2.8B deal to license muscular dystrophy gene therapy
A gene therapy invented at Nationwide Children's Hospital just landed a licensing deal worth as much as $2.8 billion for a Boston biotech, and now the company's Columbus, Ohio office will play a big role in getting the treatment to the market. Sarepta Therapeutics Inc. has licensed the commercial rights outside of the United States to the Swiss pharmaceutical giant Roche for $1.1 billion in cash and stock up front. Sarepta also can earn as much as $1.7 billion in milestone payments, plus royalties.… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 30, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Carrie Ghose Source Type: news

Drug Trials Snapshots: VYONDYS 53
VYONDYS 53 is a drug for the treatment of a particular type of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). It is to be used only in patients who have a specific mutation of the dystrophin gene. (Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New)
Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New - December 26, 2019 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: FDA Source Type: news

Roche Dives Deeper Into Gene Therapy With $1.15 Bln Sarepta Licensing Deal Roche Dives Deeper Into Gene Therapy With $1.15 Bln Sarepta Licensing Deal
Roche Holding AG made its second major gene therapy deal in a year on Monday, spending $1.15 billion to obtain the rights to Sarepta Therapeutics Inc's investigational drug to treat duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) outside the United States.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - December 24, 2019 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care News Source Type: news

Roche dives deeper into gene therapy with $1.15 billion Sarepta licensing deal
Roche Holding AG made its second major gene therapy deal in a year on Monday, spending $1.15 billion to obtain the rights to Sarepta Therapeutics Inc's investigational drug to treat duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) outside the United States. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Roche enters $1.15 billion licensing deal for Sarepta gene therapy
Roche entered into a $1.15 billion licensing agreement with Sarepta Therapeutics to obtain the right to launch and commercialize Sarepta's investigational gene therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) outside the United States. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Roche enters licensing agreement with Sarepta Therapeutics to improve the lives of patients living with Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Basel, 23 December 2019 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) and Sarepta Therapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ:SRPT), today announced the signing of a licensing agreement providing Roche exclusive commercial rights to SRP-9001 (AAVrh74.MHCK7.micro-dystrophin),   Sarepta’s investigational gene therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), outside the United States. Under the terms of the agreement, Sarepta will receive an upfront payment of $750million in cash and $400million in equity. In addition, Sarepta is eligible to receive regulatory and sales m ilestones, and royalties on net sales. Roche and Sarepta will equally s...
Source: Roche Media News - December 23, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Roche enters licensing agreement with Sarepta Therapeutics to improve the lives of patients living with Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Basel, 23 December 2019 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) and Sarepta Therapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ:SRPT), today announced the signing of a licensing agreement providing Roche exclusive commercial rights to SRP-9001 (AAVrh74.MHCK7.micro-dystrophin),   Sarepta’s investigational gene therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), outside the United States. Under the terms of the agreement, Sarepta will receive an upfront payment of $750million in cash and $400million in equity. In addition, Sarepta is eligible to receive regulatory and sales m ilestones, and royalties on net sales. Roche and Sarepta will equally s...
Source: Roche Investor Update - December 23, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What to know about RSD
Reflex sympathetic dystrophy, or RSD, is a nerve disorder that affects pain regulation. Here, learn about the symptoms and treatment options. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pain / Anesthetics Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What to know about the Moro reflex?
This article provides more details, including possible triggers and how to calm a baby with Moro reflex. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics / Children's Health Source Type: news

Rare diseases: customizing cures, patient by patient
Yale geneticist Monkol Lek, Ph.D., who has muscular dystrophy, wants to cure a rare form of the disease. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - December 20, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

In surprise decision, US approves muscular dystrophy drug
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a second drug to treat muscular dystrophy, the debilitating disease that causes loss of movement and early death (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - December 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Sarepta shares surge after surprise approval of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy drug
Shares of Sarepta Therapeutics Inc soared 36% on Friday after U.S. regulators shocked Wall Street by approving the company's treatment for a muscle-wasting disorder less than four months after rejecting the drug over safety concerns. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

FDA Approves Previously Rejected Muscular Dystrophy Treatment
The drug Vyondys 53 has met a surrogate endpoint of protein production, but there ’s no clear proof it has a clinical benefit. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - December 13, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

FDA OKs Golodirsen (Vyondys 53) for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy FDA OKs Golodirsen (Vyondys 53) for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
Golodirsen is the first treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in patients with a confirmed mutation amenable to exon 53 skipping.FDA Approvals (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - December 13, 2019 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Alert Source Type: news

FDA oks Sarepta muscular dystrophy drug after previous rejection
The U.S. FDA granted an accelerated approval to Sarepta Therapeutics'therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, reversing its original rejection. (Source: PharmaManufacturing.com)
Source: PharmaManufacturing.com - December 13, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

FDA grants accelerated approval to first targeted treatment for rare Duchenne muscular dystrophy mutation
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted accelerated approval to Vyondys 53 (golodirsen) injection to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients who have a confirmed mutation of the dystrophin gene that is amenable to exon 53 skipping. It is estimated that about 8 percent of patients with DMD have this mutation. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - December 13, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured FDA Regulatory Affairs Source Type: news

In an about face, FDA approves Sarepta's 2nd Duchenne drug
The FDA unexpectedly reversed course Thursday, approving the second treatment developed by Sarepta Therapeutics for the rare disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy just a few months after rejecting the drug.   Sarepta (Nasdaq: SRPT) announced Thursday evening that the agency had approved its second drug, called Vyondys 53. After the drug was originally rejected by the FDA in August due to concerns over the risk of infection at the infusion site and renal toxicity, the company filed an appeal. The comp any… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 13, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Allison DeAngelis Source Type: news

U.S. FDA gives early approval to Sarepta's newest DMD treatment
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday granted an early approval to Sarepta Therapeutics Inc's second treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

FDA Okays First Newborn Screening Test for Duchenne MD FDA Okays First Newborn Screening Test for Duchenne MD
The FDA has approved the marketing of the GSP Neonatal Creatine Kinase-MM kit to aid in the screening of newborns for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.FDA Approvals (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - December 12, 2019 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Alert Source Type: news

Today, the @US_FDA authorized the marketing of the first test to aid in newborn screening for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), a rare genetic disorder that causes progressive muscle deterioration and weakness. Find out more about the new approval https://go.usa.gov/xpdH4   pic.twitter.com/0pFyl2MYOw
Today, the @US_FDA authorized the marketing of the first test to aid in newborn screening for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), a rare genetic disorder that causes progressive muscle deterioration and weakness. Find out more about the new approval https://go.usa.gov/xpdH4  pic.twitter.com/0pFyl2MYOw (Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew)
Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew - December 12, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: ( at FDADeviceInfo) Source Type: news

FDA Approves Vyondys 53 (golodirsen) Injection for the Treatment of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) in Patients Amenable to Skipping Exon 53
CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Dec. 12, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Sarepta Therapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ:SRPT), the leader in precision genetic medicine for rare diseases, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Vyondys 53™... (Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals)
Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals - December 12, 2019 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

At least 4 Supreme Court justices seem sympathetic to Moda's claims
Moda is trying to recoup $249 million it is owed under the government's risk corridors program. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - December 11, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

U.S. Supreme Court justices lean toward insurers on $12 billion Obamacare claims
U.S. Supreme Court justices on Tuesday appeared sympathetic to claims made by health insurers seeking $12 billion from the federal government under a program set up by the Obamacare law aimed at encouraging them to offer medical coverage to previously uninsured Americans. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

HPV Genotyping and Reflex Cytology Efficient for Cervical-Cancer Screening HPV Genotyping and Reflex Cytology Efficient for Cervical-Cancer Screening
Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping for HPV-16 and HPV-18, followed by reflex cytological testing in women with positive results, is more likely than cytological testing alone to detect cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 2 or higher, according to results from the FRIDA study.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - December 3, 2019 Category: Pathology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Woman with muscular dystrophy says cosplay 'saved her life'
Amber Guzman, 32, from Long Beach, California, has muscular dystrophy. The incurable condition has left Amber in a wheelchair. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UMass Medical School Works To Ease Challenge Of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
WORCESTER (CBS) — Caring for a child with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy can be incredibly challenging, but thanks to a local family’s philanthropy and a local medical school’s commitment, treatment is becoming easier for patients and their families. At just over a year old, Diego Ramirez was diagnosed with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, or DMD, a progressive genetic disorder in boys that leads to muscle breakdown. “His muscles felt a little tighter for me, and I felt he was delayed in his development,” said Diego’s mom, Leslie Guzman. Most boys with DMD lose the ability to walk by age 12 and...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Duchenne muscular dystrophy Source Type: news

Babies in the womb may see more than we thought
(University of California - Berkeley) Light-sensitive cells active in the retina even before the fetus can distinguish images may play a larger role in the developing eye and brain than previously thought. Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells seemingly help establish blood supply to the retina, circadian rhythms and the pupillary light reflex. UC Berkeley researchers have now discovered that these cells are electrically connected in a network that is able to detect light intensity, suggesting a bigger role in development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 25, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Next-Gen Sleep Apnea Test Sends Data to App Throughout the Night
Patients interested in testing themselves at home for sleep apnea now have a few more options. Earlier this year Itamar Medical Ltd. introduced its third-generation WatchPAT home sleep apnea test (HSAT), the WatchPAT 300, and in June 2019, it debuted WatchPAT ONE, which the company calls the first and only disposable HSAT in the market. This month Blue Shield of California (BSC) and the Blue Cross Blue Shield Federal Employee Plan (BCBS FEP) included WatchPAT as a covered HSAT, Itamar reported in a news release. It added that changes in the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) 2020 Fee Schedule are expec...
Source: MDDI - November 21, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news

The online health trends pharma should be tapping into
Each year digital folk all over the world look to the Internet Trends report, delivered by Bond Capital founder Mary Meeker, for a summary of the most important emerging online technologies and consumer behaviours.    The 2019 report underlines the strength of some trends familiar to pharma and points to some unsettling implications for the industry if it cannot respond appropriately. Along with some general online trends - the growing consumption of images and video, the rise of the podcast and the ongoing spread of Amazon Echo - the report highlights some important consumer healthcare trends.  Perhaps th...
Source: EyeForPharma - November 20, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Andrew Stone Source Type: news

JAR 914: Father Declares War on Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
New Jersey dad declares war on son's incurable disease - Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. JAR of Hope nonprofit funds start of medical infusions to slow rare disease that effects 20,000 in U.S. (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - November 19, 2019 Category: Disability Tags: USA - Americas Source Type: news

Trial of Gene Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Put on Hold
The US Food and Drug Administration halts a study by Solid Biosciences after a patient experiences severe side effects following treatment. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - November 12, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Intelligent Metamaterials Could Make MRI ’s Safer and More Affordable
Boston University researchers have developed a new, "intelligent" metamaterial -- which costs less than ten bucks to build -- that could revolutionize MRI, making the entire MRI process faster, safer, and more accessible to patients around the world. The technology, which builds on previous metamaterial work by the team, was described in a new paper in Advanced Materials. MRI is used by clinicians to diagnose medical problems by spotting abnormalities that could indicate anything from a torn meniscus to muscular dystrophy. But MRIs are expensive, expose patients to radiation, and they take a long time -- often th...
Source: MDDI - November 6, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MDDI Staff Tags: Imaging R & D Source Type: news

Intelligent Metamaterials Could Make MRI ’s Faster and More Affordable
Boston University researchers have developed a new, "intelligent" metamaterial -- which costs less than ten bucks to build -- that could revolutionize MRI, making the entire MRI process faster, safer, and more accessible to patients around the world. The technology, which builds on previous metamaterial work by the team, was described in a new paper in Advanced Materials. MRI is used by clinicians to diagnose medical problems by spotting abnormalities that could indicate anything from a torn meniscus to muscular dystrophy. But MRIs are expensive, and they take a long time -- often the greater part of an hour for ...
Source: MDDI - November 6, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MDDI Staff Tags: Imaging R & D Source Type: news