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The Latest: Marijuana case judge indicates he's sympathetic
The judge hearing a lawsuit challenging federal marijuana laws has indicated that he is sympathetic to some patients who use cannabis to treat medical conditions (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

New device measures blink reflex parameters to quickly and objectively identify concussion
(Medical University of South Carolina) The Blink ReflexometerTM offers a valid, reliable tool for identifying concussion head injuries, report investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina and The Citadel in the January issue of Cogent Engineering. Comparing blink reflex parameters in football players suspected of having sustained a concussion to healthy players revealed specific, significant differences. Noninvasive and quick to collect, blink reflex data provide objective support for concussion-related decisions and may be useful in other neurological disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sarepta shares plunge on U.K. trial halt, but analyst downplays safety fears
Sarepta Therapeutics confirmed Friday that U.K. regulators have temporarily halted a late-stage trial of two drugs for the muscle-wasting diseases Duchenne muscular dystrophy after one patient experienced a serious medical issue. But one analyst downplayed the incident as an “isolated event.” In a statement, Cambridge-based Sarepta (Nasdaq: SRPT) said the patient’s medical issue “could possibly be related” to the blinded study, in which patients were given one of two drugs, called golodirsen… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 9, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Max Stendahl Source Type: news

Device that measures cell strength could help identify drugs for asthma, hypertension and muscular dystrophy
Engineers, doctors and scientists at UCLA and Rutgers University have developed a tool that measures the physical strength of individual cells 100 times faster than current technologies.The new device could make it easier and faster to test and evaluate new drugs for diseases associated with abnormal levels of cell strength, including hypertension, asthma and muscular dystrophy. It could also open new avenues for biological research into cell force. It is the first high-throughput tool that can measure the strength of thousands of individual cells at a time.“Our tool tracks how much force individual cells exert over ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 9, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

How Loud Noise Exposure Is Linked to Heart Disease
If you live near an airport, railroad tracks or a busy road, you might be concerned about how fumes from those planes, trains and automobiles are affecting your health. But according to a new review in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, there may be another threat to worry about: high levels of noise that may be bad for your heart. A connection between noise pollution and cardiovascular disease has been observed in numerous studies over the years, the authors of the new review said. High decibel levels from road traffic and airplanes, for example, has been linked to high blood pressure, coronary artery dise...
Source: TIME: Health - February 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized are loud noises unhealthy healthytime Heart Disease heart disease risks heart health Journal of the American College of Cardiology noise level meter noise meter noise pollution noise-cancelling headphones onetime Rese Source Type: news

New CRISPR method efficiently corrects DMD defect in heart tissue
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) Scientists have developed a CRISPR gene-editing technique that can potentially correct a majority of the 3,000 mutations that cause Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by making a single cut at strategic points along the patient's DNA, according to a study from UT Southwestern Medical Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Analysis of global duchenne muscular dystrophy patients registry underscores
(IOS Press) Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a a rare and fatal genetically-inherited degenerative neuromuscular disease that affects one in 5,000 newborn boys. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UCLA faculty voice: Defeating depression
Gene Block is the chancellor of UCLA. This column appeared in the January 2018 issue of UCLA Magazine.Years ago, as a young neuroscientist studying crayfish, I developed an incredible respect for the brain ’s complexities. I found that even a simple reflex — one that allows the animal to flip its tail when in danger — was regulated by the brain. When the crayfish moved voluntarily, I learned, the reflex was disabled, preventing an unintended tail flip. Clearly, nothing is simple when it comes to the brain.In humans, brain science poses arguably the greatest challenge of any field in contemporary science. ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 1, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Myoediting for Duchenne muscular dystrophy
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 1, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Shilatifard, A. Tags: twis Source Type: news

Heart rate variability among children with acquired brain injury - Kim SW, Jeon HR, Kim JY, Kim Y.
OBJECTIVE: To find evidence of autonomic imbalance and present the heart rate variability (HRV) parameters that reflect the severity of paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity (PSH) in children with acquired brain injury (ABI). METHODS: Thirteen child... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

This company is the result of Nationwide Children's reviving gene therapy in the U.S.
It ’s the stuff of science fiction – replacing defective genes in the human body with new ones that will stop a debilitating disease. But it seems to becoming reality at Michael Triplett’s new Columbus gene therapy company, which is having success controlling a rare muscular dystrophy disease tha t cripples its patients. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - January 29, 2018 Category: Health Management Source Type: news

Two area biotechs raise $210M in IPOs, then watch shares soar
Cambridge-based Solid Biosciences and Boston-based resTORbio raised a combined $210 million in initial public offerings over the past day, and as of 3 p.m. Friday both the company ’s shares were trading significantly up from the IPO price. Solid Biosciences, a company working on drugs to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy, raised $125 million by pricing its shares at $16, below the $18 to $19 range first proposed. The reason appears to be a disclosure Thursday morning in a federal filing that the… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 26, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Don Seiffert Source Type: news

Falls and resulting fractures in myotonic dystrophy: results from a multinational retrospective survey - Jim énez-Moreno AC, Raaphorst J, Babačić H, Wood L, van Engelen B, Lochmüller H, Schoser B, Wenninger S.
Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 multisystem involvement leads to functional impairment with an increased risk of falling. This multinational study estimates the prevalence of falls and fall-associated fractures. A web-based survey among disease-specific registri... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Falls Source Type: news

The diving reflex and asphyxia: working across species in physiological ecology - Hagen JB.
Beginning in the mid-1930s the comparative physiologists Laurence Irving and Per Fredrik (Pete) Scholander pioneered the study of diving mammals, particularly harbor seals. Although resting on earlier work dating back to the late nineteenth century, their ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Drowning, Suffocation Source Type: news

Impact of Reflex Algorithms on Urine Culture Utilization
Urine culture is the gold standard for the diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI), one of the most common causes of bacterial infection. As such, urine specimens are responsible for a major share of the workload in clinical microbiology laboratories. The inclusion of metrics, such as the catheter-associated UTI (CAUTI) rate, that factor into hospital reimbursements and concerns surrounding the attrition of clinical laboratory personnel have prompted scrutiny of urine culture utilization in many organizations. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - January 18, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Melanie L. Yarbrough Source Type: news

Marriage and Mania: Disparate Depictions of Bipolar Disorder in Mainstream Romance Novels
When characters with mental illness appear in popular fiction, it is typically because the work itself focuses on the mental illness. However, there is a small contingent of fictional projects that have characters with mental illness that do not make that illness the central plot. These books follow the typical narrative arc and literary conventions of their genre and include conflicts unrelated to mental illness; psychiatric disorder is featured but defines neither the character nor the book.   Authors writing about mental illness, however small or large a part of the plot, can raise public awareness and understandin...
Source: Psych Central - January 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Kathryn Lawson, PhD Tags: Bipolar Essays Policy and Advocacy Psychology Women's Issues Bipolar Disorder Compassion Empathy genre fiction mania Manic Episode romance novels Stigma Stigmatization Source Type: news

Gene editing – and what it really means to rewrite the code of life
We now have a precise way to correct, replace or even delete faulty DNA.Ian Sample explains the science, the risks and what the future may holdSo what is gene editing?Scientists liken it to the find and replace feature used to correct misspellings in documents written on a computer. Instead of fixing words, gene editing rewrites DNA, the biological code that makes up the instruction manuals of living organisms. With gene editing, researchers can disable target genes,correct harmful mutations, and change the activity of specific genes in plants and animals, including humans.What ’s the point?Much of the excitement aro...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Genetics Medical research Science Health Biology Source Type: news

Which TSH Cutoffs Are Optimal for Testing Free T4? Which TSH Cutoffs Are Optimal for Testing Free T4?
A new study examines the utility of different TSH cutoffs for reflex free T4 testing for the diagnosis of thyroid dysfunction.Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - January 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology Journal Article Source Type: news

Study reveals reversibility of Friedreich ’s ataxia in mice
Friedreich ’s ataxia is an inherited disease that causes damage to the nervous system and a loss of coordination that typically progresses to muscle weakness. It can begin causing symptoms in childhood or early adulthood and, over time, it can also lead to vision loss and diabetes.Scientists seeking a better understanding of the disease have tried for years to replicate the disease ’s symptoms and progression in laboratory mice, but until recently have been largely unsuccessful.Now, a team of UCLA researchers has recreated aspects of Friedreich ’s ataxia in mice and shown that many early symptoms of the d...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 2, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Striking a balance: Charlie ’s recovery from neonatal stroke
“Hey, Charlie,” says Dr. Michael Rivkin as he gently dangles a small rubber ducky in front of the little boy. “Would you like this?” A wide smile breaks out across the toddler’s face. Why yes, he certainly would like that duck. He reaches and grasps at it, closing his tiny fingers around the toy. For Charlie Strzempek, it’s nothing more than a playful act. But for his parents, Kathleen and Tom, it’s a major accomplishment. Dr. Rivkin isn’t simply offering his patient a toy. He’s testing his ability to grab and hold an object in his right hand — the side of his bod...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - December 27, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Michael Rivkin Julie Croteau occupational therapy stroke Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center Source Type: news

Driving restrictions for patients with reflex syncope - Sumiyoshi M.
Reflex syncope is the most common form of syncope that occurs while driving. The 2014 revision of Japanese Road Traffic Laws placed stricter driving restrictions, along with some associated legal penalties, on individuals with recurrent syncope. "Recurrent... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news

FDA approves gene therapy to fix mutations that can lead to blindness
In a decision that accelerates a new era for gene therapy, the Food and Drug Administration on Tuesdayapproved a DNA-altering medication that can reverse an inherited form of progressive blindness.The FDA ’s blessing makes Luxturna, a treatment for retinal dystrophy caused by a specific genetic... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - December 20, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Gene Therapy for Inherited Retinal Dystrophy Gets FDA Clearance
(MedPage Today) -- Luxturna is first approved gene therapy to replace a specific mutated gene (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - December 19, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

UCLA researchers create skeletal muscle from stem cells
UCLA scientists have developed a new strategy to efficiently isolate, mature and transplant skeletal muscle cells created from human pluripotent stem cells, which can produce all cell types of the body. The findings are a major step toward  the development of a stem cell replacement therapy for muscle diseases including Duchenne muscular dystrophy, which affects approximately 1 in 5,000 boys in the U.S. and is the most common fatal childhood genetic disease.The study, which was published in the journal Nature Cell Biology, was led by senior author April Pyle, associate professor of microbiology, immunology and molecul...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 18, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA researchers create skeletal muscle from stem cells
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) UCLA scientists have developed a new strategy to efficiently isolate, mature and transplant skeletal muscle cells created from human pluripotent stem cells, which can produce all cell types of the body. The findings are a major step towards developing a stem cell replacement therapy for muscle diseases including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, which affects approximately 1 in 5,000 boys in the US and is the most common fatal childhood genetic disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New 'checkpoint' model that could identify potential drugs to treat genetic disorders
(University of Bradford) A new 'checkpoint' model which can be used to identify potential treatments for genetic disorders such as cystic fibrosis and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) has been proposed by a team of Bradford scientists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Interaction Between Bronchoconstriction and Cough in Asthma Interaction Between Bronchoconstriction and Cough in Asthma
New research sheds light on the interactions between acute bronchoconstriction and the cough reflex in patients with asthma.Thorax (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - December 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pulmonary Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news

Feistein Institute launches bioelectronic medicine trial for treating Lupus
Researchers at the Feinstein Institute launched a clinical trial looking to explore the efficacy of bioelectronic medicine specifically designed to manage pain associated with lupus. The study is exploring the use of a proprietary device, designed based upon previous research at the Feinstein Institute, which emits electrical pulses through a patient’s ear for five minutes a day over four days. “Lupus is a painful disease, notoriously hard to diagnose and difficult to treat – new treatment options are desperately needed. This trial will study an innovative approach to controlling symptoms of a d...
Source: Mass Device - December 14, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Blog The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research Source Type: news

Insight into how infants learn to walk
(Lancaster University) Ten-week-old babies can learn from practicing walking months before they begin walking themselves. Researchers gave the infants experience at 'reflex walking' which is a primitive instinct in babies which disappears around 12 weeks of age. Results show that brain activity is associated with the perception of walking even at such a young age. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: The medical community isn’t prepared for the looming pandemic of neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s
(Natural News) Parkinson’s disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease plaguing people today, with an estimated 1 million Americans are battling this illness – more than Lou Gehrig’s disease, muscular dystrophy and multiple sclerosis combined. Parkinson’s causes certain nerve cells in the brain to die, affecting movement and causing worsening tremors and stiffness. The... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nationwide Children's gene therapy spinout raises $2.5M to test muscular dystrophy treatment
A gene therapy startup that spun out of Nationwide Children's Hospital six months ago has raised $2.5 million toward testing a treatment for a form of muscular dystrophy in patients. Myonexus Therapeutics Inc. is the fourth company to come out of gene therapy research at the Columbus hospital and the only one located in Central Ohio. CEO Michael Triplett and COO Bruce Halpryn are based in New Albany, and all of the contract research it sponsors takes place at Children's. “ The clinical impact… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 13, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Carrie Ghose Source Type: news

Research reveals how diabetes in pregnancy affects baby ’s heart
Researchers at the  Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have discovered how high glucose levels — whether caused by diabetes or other factors — keep heart cells from maturing normally. Their findings help explain why babies born to women with diabetes are more likely to develop congenital heart disease.The study, which was led by Atsushi “Austin” Nakano, a UCLA associate professor of molecular, cell, and developmental biology and member of the Broad Stem Cell Research Center, was published today in the journal eLife.When developing heart cell...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 12, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Voices: The Disabled Fl â neur
My diagnosis won ’ t keep me away from the city streets and the sweet energy that ’ s found there, even if someday I “ walk ” by dint of wheels. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: MARIAN RYAN Tags: Disabilities Muscular Dystrophy Wheelchairs Sidewalks Muscles Travel and Vacations Berlin (Germany) Source Type: news

SetPoint Medical wins FDA IDE trial nod for rheumatoid arthritis implant trial
SetPoint Medical said today it won FDA investigational device exemption clearance to launch a trial of its proprietary bioelectronic device designed to treat patients with drug refractory rheumatoid arthritis. The device is designed to be surgically placed on the vagus nerve to activate the body’s natural inflammatory reflex, the Valencia, Calif.-based company said. “We are ready to build on the published positive data from our earlier first-in-human proof-of-concept study of bioelectronic therapy in RA, which significantly improved measures of RA disease activity in this difficult-to-treat patient po...
Source: Mass Device - December 11, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Pain Management SetPoint Medical Source Type: news

Bilateral early activity in the hip flexors associated with falls in stroke survivors: preliminary evidence from laboratory-induced falls - Celinskis D, Grabiner MD, Honeycutt CF.
OBJECTIVE: Falls are the most common and expensive medical complication following stroke. Hypermetric reflexes have been suggested to impact post-stroke balance but no study has evaluated reflex amplitudes under real conditions of falls in this population.... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Pathophysiology of Reflex Syncope: A Review Pathophysiology of Reflex Syncope: A Review
This review elucidates the nomenclature and pathophysiology of various forms of reflex syncope, including vasovagal syncope, carotid sinus syndrome, and situational syncope.Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - December 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Lab notes: raise a glass to your ear and hail the dinosaur swan
It lived about 71m years ago, had a swan-like neck, razor-sharp “killer claws” and a duck-billed snout and was about the size of a mallard, with a long tail and longer legs. This ‘very weird’ creature (not my words, that’s an actual scientist’s description there) is apparently anew species of amphibious dinosaur, discovered in a smuggled fossil from Mongolia. And to toast that exciting news, you ’ll need a really good glass of champagne - but how will you know whether you’ve been passed plonk or premier cru?According to researchers, the sound of the bubbles reveals all ... As...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Tash Reith-Banks Tags: Science Source Type: news

In lab research, scientists slow progression of a fatal form of muscular dystrophy
(Saint Louis University) Saint Louis University researchers report that a new drug reduces fibrosis (scarring) and prevents loss of muscle function in an animal model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Adapted Crispr gene editing tool could treat incurable diseases, say scientists
New form of genetic engineering designed to boost gene activity could one day be used to overcome diseases such as diabetes and muscular dystrophyIncurable diseases such as diabetes and muscular dystrophy could be treated in future using a new form of genetic engineering designed to boost gene activity, according to scientists.The technique is an adapted version of the powerful gene editing tool called Crispr. While the original version of Crispr snips DNA in precise locations to delete faulty genes or over-write flaws in the genetic code, the modified form “turns up the volume” on selected genes.Continue readi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 7, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Genetics Science Medical research Diabetes Biology Source Type: news

Researchers Advance Techniques To Change Gene Regulation And Treat Disease In Mice
Researchers were able to improve kidney function in mice with induced kidney damage, turn liver cells into insulin-producing pancreas cells in mice modeling type 1 diabetes, and improve muscle strength in animals with a muscular dystrophy-like condition. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - December 7, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ellie Kincaid, Forbes Staff Source Type: news

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute CEO Wants To Tax Biopharma To Pay For The NIH
We are all sympathetic with getting significantly more funding for the NIH. After all, this can benefit us all. Let ’s do so in a more creative fashion than levying a “tax”. Let’s try to find a win-win solution that we can all embrace. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - December 4, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John LaMattina, Contributor Tags: NYSE:PFE NASDAQ:AAPL NYSE:MRK Source Type: news

Capricor Therapeutics Announces FDA Clearance of Investigational New Drug (IND) Application for CAP-1002
Potential Registration Trial in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy on Track to Initiate in First Quarter of 2018 Company to Host Conference Call and Webcast at 4:30 p.m. ET Today LOS ANGELES, Nov. 29, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Capri... Biopharmaceuticals, FDA Capricor Therapeutics, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - November 29, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Three-camera setup to record simultaneously standardized high-definition video for smile analysis
ConclusionsThis new technique to capture standardized high-definition video and still images simultaneously from 3 positions is a reliable and practical tool. The technique is easy to learn and implement in the orthodontic office. (Source: Dental Technology Blog)
Source: Dental Technology Blog - November 27, 2017 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

How soon will the 'ice apocalypse' come?
An emotive article on the ‘ice apocalypse’ by Eric Holthaus describes a terrifying vision of catastrophic sea level rise this century caused by climate change and the collapse of the Antarctic ice sheet. But how likely is this – and how soon could such a future be here?I ’ve been gripped by the story of Antarctic ‘ice cliff instability’ever since Rob DeConto and Dave Pollard published theircontroversial predictions last year. They suggesteddisintegration of ice shelves caused by global warming could leave behind coastal ice cliffs so tall they would be unstable, crumbling endlessly into ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Tamsin Edwards Tags: Science Climate change Antarctica Source Type: news

United Therapeutics Announces Additional Six Months Of Regulatory Exclusivity For Adcirca(R)
SILVER SPRING, Md. and RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, N.C., Nov. 20, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- United Therapeutics Corporation (NASDAQ: UTHR) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted pediatric exclusivi... Biopharmaceuticals, FDA, Licensing United Therapeutics, Adcirca, tadalafil, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - November 20, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Duchenne muscular dystrophy sufferers cannot walk
Brothers Elliot Johnson, 14, and Henry, 11, from Pennsylvania fear they won't be able to walk again after the FDA pulled the drugs that have kept their rare muscle disorder under control. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Health insurer Anthem eases restrictions on Sarepta's Duchenne treatment
NEW YORK (Reuters) - Health insurer Anthem Inc has eased access to Sarepta Therapeutics' treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and on Thursday changed its reimbursement policy on its website to "medically necessary." (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Virtual gene editing startup to lease Cambridge lab after $40M round
The company, Exonics Therapeutics, said the Series A round will allow it to hire scientists to conduct preclinical research into a potential treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - November 8, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Max Stendahl Source Type: news

All babies in Europe should be screened for heart defects at birth
Only a few countries, including Poland, Ireland and Switzerland, currently recommend universal screening with pulse oximetry Related items fromOnMedica Blood test identifies high-risk lupus pregnancies Newborns screened for four additional genetic conditions Over 600,000 carry ‘sudden death’ gene fault The next generation of prenatal testing: let ’s proceed with caution Experts advise against screening for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - November 8, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

SLU researcher draws bulls eye around muscular dystrophy drug targets
(Saint Louis University) Scientist Francis M. Sverdrup, Ph.D., studies an inherited type of muscular dystrophy that typically begins with weakness in the face and shoulders before spreading to all skeletal muscles. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news