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Myonexus Therapeutics receives FDA Rare Pediatric Disease Designation
(CincyTech) Myonexus Therapeutics, a clinical-stage gene therapy company developing first ever corrective gene therapies for limb girdle muscular dystrophies, and Nationwide Children's Hospital announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Rare Pediatric Disease Designation for the MYO-101 program, an AAV-based gene therapy for the treatment of limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) type 2E. In February 2018, the MYO-101 program was granted Orphan Drug Designation (ODD) by FDA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 16, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UCLA biologists ‘transfer’ a memory
UCLA biologists report they have transferred a memory from one marine snail to another, creating an artificial memory, by injecting RNA from one to another. This research could lead to new ways to lessen the trauma of painful memories with RNA and to restore lost memories.“I think in the not-too-distant future, we could potentially use RNA to ameliorate the effects of Alzheimer’s disease or post-traumatic stress disorder,” said David Glanzman, senior author of the study and a UCLA professor of integrative biology and physiology and of neurobiology. The team’sresearch is published May 14 in eNeuro, t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 15, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Gaze stability, dynamic balance and participation deficits in people with multiple sclerosis at fall-risk - Garg H, Dibble LE, Schubert MC, Sibthorp J, Foreman KB, Gappmaier E.
Despite the common complaints of dizziness and demyelination of afferent or efferent pathways to and from the vestibular nuclei which may adversely affect the angular Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (aVOR) and vestibulo-spinal function in persons with Multiple Scl... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

‘ All of Us ’ Research Program Recruiting Participants
BOSTON (CBS) – The future of healthcare is to customize therapies based on a patient’s individual background.  That requires a large amount of data on people from all walks of life. As Dr. Mallika Marshall reports, local researchers are recruiting thousands of New Englanders to participate in one of the largest biobanks of its kind. If you had high blood pressure, wouldn’t it be nice to know exactly what medications would be best for you? Local researchers are recruiting thousands of New Englanders to participate in one of the largest biobanks of its kind. (WBZ-TV) It’s called precision me...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Biomedical Research Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Can Infant Eyes Predict Autism?
(MedPage Today) -- Pupillary light reflex in babies may identify future toddlers with ASD (Source: MedPage Today Neurology)
Source: MedPage Today Neurology - May 10, 2018 Category: Neurology Source Type: news

Much policy on newborn blood spot screening ignores evidence
Many national recommendations on screening are not based on evidence of key benefits and harms, say researchers Related items fromOnMedica Experts advise against screening for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy All babies in Europe should be screened for heart defects at birth The next generation of prenatal testing: let ’s proceed with caution Antenatal flu drugs not linked to newborn risks (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - May 10, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Pupillary reflex may predict autism
A new study examines the pupillary light reflex in infants and concludes that the amount of light the pupil lets in may be an accurate autism predictor. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Autism Source Type: news

If you believe it, it's truer
(American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) According to Dr. Gilead, 'In order to make informed decisions, people need to be able to consider the merits and weaknesses of different opinions and adapt to new information. This involuntary, 'reflex-like' tendency to consider things we already believe in as being true, might dampen our ability to think things through in a rational way. Future studies could explore how other factors, such as acute stress or liberal or conservative viewpoints, affect this tendency to accept or reject opinions in a 'knee-jerk' manner.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study links strong pupillary light reflex in infancy to later autism diagnosis
(Uppsala University) A new study published in Nature Communications shows that infants who are later diagnosed with autism react more strongly to sudden changes in light. This finding provides support for the view that sensory processing plays an important role in the development of the disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Increased nerve activity may raise blood pressure in anxiety
(American Physiological Society) Sympathetic nerve activity to skeletal muscle blood vessels--a function of the nervous system that helps regulate blood pressure--increases during physiological and mental stress in people with chronic anxiety, a new study finds. Over time, this response may increase the risk of high blood pressure and heart disease, although the study did not test this specifically. The study, published ahead of print in the Journal of Neurophysiology, is an APSselect article for May. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Students create exoskeleton app for patient with muscular dystrophy
(Michigan State University) A team of Michigan State University students invented an exoskeleton app to help a patient suffering from muscular dystrophy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Save our nurseries: when the kids went to Westminster
Ryan, Daniel, Jacob, Sophia and Zach were probably some of the youngest campaigners at the Houses of Parliament last week. They were there (with their mums) to talk to MPs about keeping their nurseries open. The group of children, parents, UNISON organisers and staff from the nursery began the day at 5am, with a six-hour coach journey from Salford to London. When they arrived they were focused, placards in hand and ready for action Zoe Ireland and her daughter Alice queue up to enter the Houses of Parliament They were there because five council-run nurseries in Salford could be closed down. Two months ago the parents had r...
Source: UNISON Health care news - April 30, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: Rosa Ellis Tags: Article early years education nurseries Salford unison in schools Source Type: news

Medical News Today: ALS: Most physically active have '26 percent higher risk'
A large study conducted in three countries provides good evidence of a link between a history of vigorous physical activity and the risk of developing ALS. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Muscular Dystrophy / ALS Source Type: news

Pfizer doses first patient using investigational mini-dystrophin gene therapy for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Pfizer Inc. has initiated a Phase 1b clinical trial for its mini-dystrophin gene therapy candidate, PF-06939926, in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The first boy received an infusion of the mini-dystrophin gene on March 22nd, administered under the supervision of principal investigator, Edward Smith, MD, Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Neurology at Duke University Medical Center. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - April 23, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Pfizer Business and Industry Source Type: news

Myonexus Therapeutics receives FDA orphan drug designation for LGMD type 2E treatment
(CincyTech) Myonexus Therapeutics , a clinical-stage gene therapy company developing first ever corrective gene therapies for limb girdle muscular dystrophies, and Nationwide Children's Hospital announce the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Orphan Drug designation to Myonexus' lead candidate, MYO-101 for the treatment of limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) type 2E. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Muscular dystrophy doesn't stop Adam living life to the full
Adam has a rare muscle-wasting disorder, but he isn't letting that stop him enjoying life. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - April 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: ALS: How 'toxic' proteins could protect neurons
Researchers have found that large, fibrous aggregates thought to drive Lou Gehrig's disease might actually help to protect motor neurons. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Muscular Dystrophy / ALS Source Type: news

ALS: How 'toxic' proteins could protect neurons
Researchers have found that large, fibrous aggregates thought to drive Lou Gehrig's disease might actually help to protect motor neurons. (Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today)
Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today - April 17, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: Muscular Dystrophy / ALS Source Type: news

Sympathetic Dysregulation May Help Explain Heart Risks in Chronic Insomnia Sympathetic Dysregulation May Help Explain Heart Risks in Chronic Insomnia
Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Pfizer launches Duchenne gene therapy study, joining Sarepta and Solid
Pfizer has officially entered the race to cure Duchenne muscular dystrophy with gene therapy, joining Cambridge-based Sarepta Therapeutics and Solid Biosciences as the only companies to use the experimental technology on a boy with the muscle-wasting disease. Pfizer (NYSE: PFE) announced on Thursday that the first patient in a small, early-stage trial of its gene therapy drug had been dosed on March 22. Earlier this year, both Sarepta (Nasdaq: SRPT) and Solid Biosciences (Nasdaq: SLDB) began their… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - April 12, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Max Stendahl Source Type: news

Neighborhood stress and autonomic nervous system activity during sleep - Mellman TA, Bell KA, Abu-Bader SH, Kobayashi I.
OBJECTIVES: Stressful neighborhood environments are known to adversely impact health and contribute to health disparities but underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Healthy sleep can provide a respite from sustained sympathetic nervous system (SNS)... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news

UCLA research could be first step toward healing the hearts of children with Duchenne
After a progressive weakening of the muscles takes away their motor skills, and then their abilities to stand and walk, most males with Duchenne muscular dystrophy die of heart and respiratory failure in their 20s.Now, researchers at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA are pursuing a cutting-edge way to stop heart disease in patients with Duchenne, which affects one in 5,000 male babies born in the United States. Their work, which is supported by a David Geffen School of Medicine Seed Grant, is just one of a number of projects underway at the medical school in which interdisciplinary groups of UCLA researchers are p...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 6, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Boy with muscle-wasting illness uses holographs to see grandparents  
EXCLUSIVE: Harrison Smith, 11, with terminal muscular dystrophy has used Microsoft's HoloLens headset and the world's first HoloPortal to talk to his grandfather. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Investors sue Solid Biosciences, say they were duped about Duchenne drug ’s safety
Cambridge-based Solid Biosciences is facing legal claims from investors after disclosing safety issues with its lead drug, a gene therapy treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Solid (Nasdaq: SLDB) revealed on March 14 that the FDA had halted an early-stage study of the drug after one patient was hospitalized. While Solid said that the patient had recovered, the disclosure sent shares of the newly-public biotech tumbling more than 60 percent. The FDA setback caught the attention of a handful… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - March 28, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Max Stendahl Source Type: news

Investors sue Solid Biosciences, say they were duped about Duchenne drug ’s safety
Cambridge-based Solid Biosciences is facing legal claims from investors after disclosing safety issues with its lead drug, a gene therapy treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Solid (Nasdaq: SLDB) revealed on March 14 that the FDA had halted an early-stage study of the drug after one patient was hospitalized. While Solid said that the patient had recovered, the disclosure sent shares of the newly-public biotech tumbling more than 60 percent. The FDA setback caught the attention of a handful… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 28, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Max Stendahl Source Type: news

Book Review: The Pocket Guide to the Polyvagal Theory
I came across the polyvagal theory some time ago in my ongoing study of finding ways to help people recover from trauma. I have come to realize that there is so much to this theory that pervades all of our behavior and feelings. Stephen Porges’ polyvagal theory is truly phenomenal. Porges’ book, The Pocket Guide to the Polyvagal Theory: The Transformative Power of Feeling Safe is another in the Norton series on interpersonal neurobiology and was written to give a nontechnical overview of the theory. It is organized in the form of edited interviews and conversations, mostly with Ruth Buczynski of the Nation...
Source: Psych Central - March 28, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Stan Rockwell, PsyD Tags: Book Reviews Neuroscience Psychiatry Psychological Assessment Psychology PTSD Trauma eastern philosophy Polyvagal Theory Psychophysiology Source Type: news

Could This Device Replace Drugs for Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment?
SetPoint Medical has launched a pilot trial to assess the safety and efficacy of a bioelectronics device in patients, who are suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and who are not adequately responsive to multiple biologic agents. The study will enroll a total of 15 subjects, aged 22 to 75, across seven U.S. investigational centers. Valencia, CA-based SetPoint's approach toward treating RA is designed to supplement the body's natural inflammatory reflex by providing "built-in" therapy and is intended to improve safety compared with drugs or biologic solutions. Currently pharmaceutical options are used to treat...
Source: MDDI - March 26, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Digital Health Implants Source Type: news

SetPoint Medical launches arthritis neurostim study
SetPoint Medical said today it launched the pilot trial of its neurostimulation device, looking to explore the system’s ability to to treat patients with drug refractory rheumatoid arthritis. The device is designed to be surgically placed on the vagus nerve to activate the body’s natural inflammatory reflex, the Valencia, Calif.-based company said. “Despite the effectiveness of biologic and targeted agents for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, many patients either do not respond, lose therapeutic response or are intolerant to these agents. There remains a real need to develop alternative therapeutic ...
Source: Mass Device - March 26, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation SetPoint Medical Source Type: news

Seeing Clearly
MONDAY, March 26, 2018 -- Many people don't think twice about their vision until there's a problem, but seeing an eye doctor should definitely be on your wellness radar at different stages of life. Newborns should get a standard reflex test. If a... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 26, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Tamoxifen and raloxifene slow down the progression of muscular dystrophy
(Elsevier) Steroids are currently the only available treatment to reduce the repetitive cycles of inflammation and disease progression associated with functional deterioration in patients with muscular dystrophy (MD). A study reported in The American Journal of Pathology showed that a new treatment approach using the selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) tamoxifen and raloxifene significantly improved cardiac, respiratory, and skeletal muscle functions and increased bone density in both male and female mice with the same gene defects as a subset of patients with MD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Human 'chimeric' cells restore crucial protein in Duchenne muscular dystrophy
(University of Illinois at Chicago) Cells made by fusing a normal human muscle cell with a muscle cell from a person with Duchenne muscular dystrophy -- a rare but fatal form of muscular dystrophy -- were able to significantly improve muscle function when implanted into the muscles of a mouse model of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nanostructures created by UCLA scientists could make gene therapies safer, faster and more affordable
UCLA scientists have developed a new method that utilizes microscopic splinter-like structures called “nanospears” for the targeted delivery of biomolecules such as genes straight to patient cells. These magnetically guided nanostructures could enable gene therapies that are safer, faster and more cost-effective.The research waspublished in the journal ACS Nano by senior author Paul Weiss, UC Presidential Chair and distinguished professor of chemistry and biochemistry, materials science and engineering, and member of theEli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA.Gene the...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 15, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Shares of Solid Biosciences crater as FDA halts Duchenne gene therapy trial
Less than two months after pulling off one of the biggest initial public offerings for a local biotech in recent years, Cambridge-based Solid Biosciences said that the FDA had halted a trial of its gene therapy treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, sending shares of the company into a tailspin. Solid (Nasdaq: SLDB) said Wednesday that the FDA had stopped an early-stage study of the drug after one patient was hospitalized due to reduced platelet and red blood cell count. The company added that… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - March 14, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Max Stendahl Source Type: news

Shares of Solid Biosciences crater as FDA halts Duchenne gene therapy trial
Less than two months after pulling off one of the biggest initial public offerings for a local biotech in recent years, Cambridge-based Solid Biosciences said that the FDA had halted a trial of its gene therapy treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, sending shares of the company into a tailspin. Solid (Nasdaq: SLDB) said Wednesday that the FDA had stopped an early-stage study of the drug after one patient was hospitalized due to reduced platelet and red blood cell count. The company added that… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 14, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Max Stendahl Source Type: news

House Rejects GOP Bill Giving Terminally Ill Patients the ‘Right to Try’ Experimental Treatment
(WASHINGTON) — The House rejected legislation Tuesday easing how experimental drugs are provided to people with terminal illnesses, as Democrats calling the bill risky and misleading overcame support from President Donald Trump and emotional arguments by Republican lawmakers and ailing constituents. The vote for the measure was 259-140, but that fell short of the two-thirds majority the GOP needed to prevail under special procedures. Since the Senate approved similar legislation last August, Republicans could revisit the legislation under rules that would require only a simple majority for passage, perhaps after rewo...
Source: TIME: Health - March 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alan Fram / AP Tags: Uncategorized APH Congress healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Sarepta Says FDA Welcomes Review Of New Muscular Dystrophy Drug
Sarepta Therapeutics says regulators at the Food and Drug Administration have told it they were open to reviewing its next experimental treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, meaning that it could file an application for the new medicine by the end of this year. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - March 12, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Matthew Herper, Forbes Staff Tags: NASDAQ:SRPT Source Type: news

Sarepta Therapeutics Announces Plan to Submit a New Drug Application (NDA) for Accelerated Approval of Golodirsen (SRP-4053) in Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) Amenable to Skipping Exon 53
CAMBRIDGE, Mass., March 12, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Sarepta Therapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ:SRPT), a commercial-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the discovery and development of precision genetic medicine to treat rare neuromuscular diseases,... (Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Applications)
Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Applications - March 12, 2018 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Patients living longer with Duchenne muscular dystrophy pose new challenge for caregivers
(Case Western Reserve University) Diagnostic and treatment advances are helping patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy live into their 30s and beyond, raising challenges in such areas as education, vocation, levels of independence, personal relationships, emotional health, and intimacy. To address these shifting circumstances, as well as reflect promising new treatment options, new guidelines aimed at physicians who care for DMD patients have recently been issued. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hikers poisoned: Veratrum steroidal alkaloid toxicity following ingestion of foraged Veratrum parviflorum - Anwar M, Turner M, Farrell N, Zomlefer WB, McDougal OM, Morgan BW.
INTRODUCTION: Steroidal alkaloids are found in plants of the genus Veratrum. Their toxicity manifests as gastrointestinal symptoms followed by a Bezold-Jarisch reflex: hypopnea, hypotension, and bradycardia. Some Veratrum steroidal alkaloids are also terat... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

It ’ s time to pay up for care
Pay in care – and the community and voluntary sector – has featured in the news a lot over the past year, with accusations over travel time, sleeping-in pay and the minimum wage. Not surprisingly, it was also an issue that loom large on the agenda at UNISON’s community service group conference in Southport this weekend. The weather may have meant reduced conference with many delegates – including president Margaret McKee, the whole of the Northern Ireland delegation, all but one Scottish delegate, and many others – unable to travel to the conference venue. But that did not lessen the value or ...
Source: UNISON Health care news - March 3, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: Tony Braisby Tags: Article News 2018 Community Conference community and austerity community and voluntary sector pay up now Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Diesel exhaust may raise risk of neurological disease
A new study has revealed that men with occupations involving exposure to diesel exhaust could be at greater risk of developing ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Muscular Dystrophy / ALS Source Type: news

Ketamine Now Being Used in Local Los Angeles clinic to treat Reflex...
Ketamine is now being used to treat Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD) and Treatment Resistant Depression (TRD) at Ketamine Healing Clinic of Los Angeles. As a safe and highly effective option for...(PRWeb February 26, 2018)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2018/02/prweb15246708.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - February 26, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Therapy for muscular dystrophy-caused heart failure also improves muscle function in mice
(Cedars-Sinai Medical Center) Injections of cardiac progenitor cells help reverse the fatal heart disease caused by Duchenne muscular dystrophy and also lead to improved limb strength and movement ability, a new study shows. The study, published today in Stem Cell Reports, showed that when researchers injected cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) into the hearts of laboratory mice with muscular dystrophy, heart function improved along with a marked increase in exercise capacity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

AMD Treat-and-Extend Regimens OK: Ophthalmology Times
(MedPage Today) -- Also, gene therapy approved for retinal dystrophy (Source: MedPage Today Primary Care)
Source: MedPage Today Primary Care - February 20, 2018 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Adverse childhood experiences and autonomic regulation in response to acute stress: the role of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems - Winzeler K, Voellmin A, Hug E, Kirmse U, Helmig S, Princip M, Cajochen C, Bader K, Wilhelm FH.
Background and objectives: After a previous report demonstrated blunted heart rate (HR) reactivity in association with adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) [Voellmin, A., Winzeler, K., Hug, E., Wilhelm, F. H., Schaefer, V., Gaab, J., … Bader, K. (2015). ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

The Latest: Marijuana case judge indicates he's sympathetic
The judge hearing a lawsuit challenging federal marijuana laws has indicated that he is sympathetic to some patients who use cannabis to treat medical conditions (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

New device measures blink reflex parameters to quickly and objectively identify concussion
(Medical University of South Carolina) The Blink ReflexometerTM offers a valid, reliable tool for identifying concussion head injuries, report investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina and The Citadel in the January issue of Cogent Engineering. Comparing blink reflex parameters in football players suspected of having sustained a concussion to healthy players revealed specific, significant differences. Noninvasive and quick to collect, blink reflex data provide objective support for concussion-related decisions and may be useful in other neurological disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sarepta shares plunge on U.K. trial halt, but analyst downplays safety fears
Sarepta Therapeutics confirmed Friday that U.K. regulators have temporarily halted a late-stage trial of two drugs for the muscle-wasting diseases Duchenne muscular dystrophy after one patient experienced a serious medical issue. But one analyst downplayed the incident as an “isolated event.” In a statement, Cambridge-based Sarepta (Nasdaq: SRPT) said the patient’s medical issue “could possibly be related” to the blinded study, in which patients were given one of two drugs, called golodirsen… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 9, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Max Stendahl Source Type: news

Device that measures cell strength could help identify drugs for asthma, hypertension and muscular dystrophy
Engineers, doctors and scientists at UCLA and Rutgers University have developed a tool that measures the physical strength of individual cells 100 times faster than current technologies.The new device could make it easier and faster to test and evaluate new drugs for diseases associated with abnormal levels of cell strength, including hypertension, asthma and muscular dystrophy. It could also open new avenues for biological research into cell force. It is the first high-throughput tool that can measure the strength of thousands of individual cells at a time.“Our tool tracks how much force individual cells exert over ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 9, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

How Loud Noise Exposure Is Linked to Heart Disease
If you live near an airport, railroad tracks or a busy road, you might be concerned about how fumes from those planes, trains and automobiles are affecting your health. But according to a new review in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, there may be another threat to worry about: high levels of noise that may be bad for your heart. A connection between noise pollution and cardiovascular disease has been observed in numerous studies over the years, the authors of the new review said. High decibel levels from road traffic and airplanes, for example, has been linked to high blood pressure, coronary artery dise...
Source: TIME: Health - February 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized are loud noises unhealthy healthytime Heart Disease heart disease risks heart health Journal of the American College of Cardiology noise level meter noise meter noise pollution noise-cancelling headphones onetime Rese Source Type: news