A Comparative Analysis of Work-Family Conflict AMONG Staff, Managerial, and Executive Nurses
Nurses typically deal with workplace issues such as workload, job demands and pressures, scheduling, shift work, and other characteristics of the nursing job that make their jobs and professional life challenging (Asiedu, Annor, Amponsah-Tawiah,& Dartey-Baah, 2018; Leineweber, Chungkham, Westerlund, Tishelman,& Lindquist, 2013; Teo, Pick, Newton, Yeung,& Chang, 2013; van Bogaert, Clarke, Roelant, Meulemans,& Van de Heyning, 2010). Nurses also frequently find themselves caught between the demands of their work and family (AlAzzam, AbuAlRub,& Nazzal, 2017; Unruh, Fottler& Raffenaud, 2016). (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - August 7, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Amanda Raffenaud, Lynn Unruh, Myron Fottler, Albert Xinliang Liu, Diane Andrews Source Type: research

A Qualitative Exploration of the Experiences of Undocumented African Immigrant Women in the Health Care Delivery System
The United States Department of Health and Human Services defines an “undocumented immigrants” as “individuals who entered as temporary residents and overstayed their visas, or are engaged in activities forbidden by their visa, or who entered without a visa” (2009). For both undocumented and documented African immigrants, migration from the African continent to countries in the Global North has largely been driven by political, social and economic strife and instability in migrants’ home countries (Naude, 2010). (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - August 7, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Oluwatoyin Olukotun, Peninnah Kako, Anne Dressel, Lucy Mkandawire-Valhmu Source Type: research

Nurse Practitioner Student Clinical Placement Processes A National Survey of Nurse Practitioner Programs
One of the greatest challenges to educating nurse practitioners (NPs) is identifying quality clinical site placements and preceptors. Significant barriers to securing NP student placements that have been identified include employer productivity demands, preceptor fatigue, and costly, time-intensive electronic health record (EHR) training (Webb, Lopez,& Guarino, 2015; Roberts, Wheeler, Taylor,& Padden, 2017). In addition, billing and coding guidelines require the preceptor to re-document a substantial portion of the student's notes (CMS, 2019). (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - July 31, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Caroline Lloyd Doherty, Louis Fogg, Mary Beth Bigley, Barbara Todd, Ann Lawrence O'Sullivan Source Type: research

Response to Letter to the Editor from Fahmi Kakamad, Abdulwahid Salih, and Hiwa Omer Baba Re: Citations of Articles in Predatory Nursing Journals
Thank you for your letter about our study on citations to predatory nursing journals (Oermann, Nicoll, Carter-Templeton, et al., in press). Many valid criticisms have been raised about Beall's list and similar lists, and authors need to be careful when using them, as we have been in our studies. While these lists can provide a beginning point to identify publishers and journals with deceptive practices and low-quality journals, authors need to assess journals themselves before submitting a manuscript. (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - July 31, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Marilyn H. Oermann, Leslie H. Nicoll, Heather Carter-Templeton, Kathleen S. Ashton, Peggy L. Chinn, Alison H. Edie Source Type: research

Comment on “Citations of articles in predatory nursing journals”
We read with great interest Oermann et al. ’s study about the citation of the articles published by the predatory journals in nursing science (Oermann et al., 2019). In a conclusive manner, the investigators collected and evaluated the citations of the papers published by the nursing predatory journals. An effort like this should be encour aged and blessed as the cybercriminals disseminated innumerable unreliable studies that challenged the medical evidence (Omer et al., 2019). (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - July 24, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Fahmi H. Kakamad, Abdulwahid M. Salih, Hiwa Omer Baba Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Letter to the editor: comment on “Citations of Articles in Predatory Nursing Journals”
We read with great interest Oermann et al. ’s study about the citation of the articles published by the predatory journals in nursing science (Oermann et al., 2019). In a conclusive manner, the investigators collected and evaluated the citations of the papers published by the nursing predatory journals. An effort like this should be encour aged and blessed as the cybercriminals disseminated innumerable unreliable studies that challenged the medical evidence (Omer et al., 2019). (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - July 24, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Fahmi H. Kakamad, Abdulwahid M. Salih, Hiwa Omer Baba Source Type: research

Moral Distress in the Critical Care Air Transport Nurse
United States Air Force (USAF) Critical Care Air Transport (CCAT) team members are responsible for providing optimal healthcare during air transport of critically ill or injured military patients, their families, and civilian members in a deployed environment or during a humanitarian crisis. As CCAT members, they complete an initial basic course and advanced training course and then repeat the advanced course every three years or just prior to deployment to maintain their readiness. CCAT teams consists of a physician, nurse and respiratory therapist. (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - July 23, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Melissa A. Wilson, John R. Cutcliffe, Col Nicole H. Armitage, Kayla N. Eaton Source Type: research

How Will We Lead? Nursing Actions to Reduce Health Impact of Addiction
Harm, chronic illness, family disruption, disparate healthcare and escalating costs. These issues together describe the effect of substance use on the health of people, children, families, communities, organizations and the nation. In 2017, drug overdose killed 70,237 people, with 47,600 deaths involving opioids [National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA), 2019]. Costs (e.g. health care, lost productivity) related to illicit drugs, alcohol and tobacco exceed $740 billion annually (NIDA, 2017). Incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), also called neonatal opioid withdraw syndrome (NOWS), rose from 1.5 to 8.0 per 1000 b...
Source: Nursing Outlook - July 18, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Robin Newhouse Source Type: research

Mentoring students engaging in scholarly projects and dissertations in doctoral nursing programs
Historically, the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) has been the primary terminal degree within the discipline of nursing. The first doctoral program in nursing was the education doctorate at Teacher's College, Columbia University in 1924. The initial PhD in nursing program was launched at New York University in 1934, followed by the University of Pittsburgh's program in 1954 (Meleis, 1988). In 1960, Boston University began the Doctor of Nursing Science program, graduating its first cohort in 1963, and in 1964 the University of California started the Doctor of Nursing Science program (Carter, 2013; Meleis, 1988). (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - July 5, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Kelley M. Anderson, Maureen Kirkpatrick McLaughlin, Nancy A. Crowell, Jane M. Fall-Dickson, Krista A. White, Ella T. Heitzler, Karen S. Kesten, Edilma L. Yearwood Source Type: research

Faculty Mentoring Roles for Scholarly Work in Doctoral Nursing Programs
Historically, the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) has been the primary terminal degree within the discipline of nursing. The first doctoral program in nursing was the education doctorate (EdD) at Teacher's College, Columbia University in 1924. The initial PhD in Nursing program was launched at New York University in 1934, followed by the University of Pittsburgh's program in 1954 (Meleis, 1988). In 1960, Boston University began the Doctor of Nursing Science (DNSc) program, graduating its first cohort in 1963, and in 1964 the University of California started the Doctor of Nursing Science (DNS) program (Carter, 2013; Meleis, 1988...
Source: Nursing Outlook - July 5, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Anderson K.M., McLaughlin M.K., Crowell N., Fall-Dickson J.M., White K.A., Heitzler E.T., Kesten K., Yearwood E.L. Source Type: research

Preventing adverse health outcomes among children and adolescents by addressing screen media practices concomitant to sleep disturbance
In today's digital age, screen media use is prevalent in the daily life and functioning of children and adolescents. Sleep disturbance and adverse health outcomes related to screen media practices are on the rise affecting physical, cognitive, and behavioral health outcomes. Mounting evidence from studies worldwide support the following recommendations addressing practice, research, and policy: (a) All practitioners are encouraged to assess youth and their families at each health encounter for screen media practices, sleep disruption and daytime sleepiness, and be able to refer to specialists or be trained on interventions...
Source: Nursing Outlook - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Susan K. Riesch, Jianghong Liu, Peter G. Kaufmann, Willa M. Doswell, Sally Cohen, Judith Vessey Source Type: research

President's Message To Mold the Future, Change is Evident
Eleanor Roosevelt once stated “The future is literally in our hands to mold as we like. But we cannot wait until tomorrow. Tomorrow is now.” As the profession, stakeholders in health, and partners across industry look to the future of health care, the American Academy of Nursing (Academy) recognizes that the opportunity is n ow to add its voice for positive change. (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Presidents Message Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: research

Informations for Readers
(Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: research

Information for Authors
(Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: research

US Nursing and Midwifery Research Capacity Building Opportunities to Achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals
From the twentieth century studies and theoretical work about professions, one of the hallmarks of a profession is that it has its own body of knowledge (Abbott, 2005; Bourgeault, Benoit,& Hirschkorn, 2009; Dussault, 2008; Faulconbridge& Muzio, 2011; Siebert, Bushfield, Martin,& Howieson, 2017; Timmermans, 2008). Said knowledge is captured through research processes, beginning with descriptive studies until enough knowledge exists to generate a systematic review that reflects the state of the science in the field. (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 28, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Allison Squires Source Type: research

A concept analysis of analgesic nonadherence for cancer pain in a time of opioid crisis
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC; 2018), an estimated 68% of the 70,200 drug overdose deaths in the United States (US) in 2017 involved the use of an opioid. In fact, the number of drug overdose deaths that implicated opioids increased six-fold between 1999 and 2017 (CDC, 2018). In the current climate of the opioid addiction epidemic, various stakeholders are calling for tighter opioid access policies, more rigorous prescribing standards, and increasingly tailored patient and community education mechanisms (Christie et al., 2017; National Academies of Sciences [NAS], 2017; National Academy o...
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 27, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: William E. Rosa, Barbara Riegel, Connie M. Ulrich, Salimah H. Meghani Source Type: research

Comparing residential long-term care regulations between nursing homes and assisted living facilities
The long-term care (LTC) sector is a major component of the U.S. health care system that continues to grow (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2014; Congressional Budget Office, 2013). Most of this increase is due to growth in the population of oldest adults (85+), a group with limited capacity for self-care due to health conditions (Congressional Budget Office, 2013; NIA, 2015). In 2014, there were over 46 million Americans 65+ years, and 6.2 million 85+ years old (Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics, 2016). (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 27, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Alison M. Trinkoff, Jung Min Yoon, Carla L. Storr, Nancy B. Lerner, Bo Kyum Yang, Kihye Han Source Type: research

High-value care for older adults with complex care needs: Leveraging nurses as innovators
Both nationally and globally, the number of older adults (people 65 years of age or older) is growing faster than any other age group. There were 49.2 million older adults in the United States in 2016 and by 2060 that number is projected to almost double to 98 million (Administration on Aging, n.d.). Most older adults in the United States have at least one chronic health condition, and close to half of this group are living with four or more chronic conditions (Buttorff, Ruder,& Bauman, 2017). The presence of multiple chronic conditions (MCCs) in the older adult population introduces many challenges. (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 27, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: George Demiris, Nancy A. Hodgson, Justine S. Sefcik, Jasmine L. Travers, Miranda Varrassee McPhillips, Mary D. Naylor Source Type: research

Nursing and midwifery advocacy to lead the United Nations Sustainable Development Agenda
Nurses and midwives are primed to lead changes toward achieving health equity, environmental sustainability, and social justice toward a world of peace and an environment in which all can thrive. In September 2015, all 193 Member States of the United Nations (UN) General Assembly unanimously adopted a transnational initiative focused on improving and safeguarding the well-being of all persons, populations, species, ecosystems, and the planet at large. The UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development was implemented on January 1, 2016 and is composed of 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and further delineated by 169 tar...
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 27, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: William E. Rosa, Ann E. Kurth, Eileen Sullivan-Marx, Judith Shamian, Holly K. Shaw, Lynda L. Wilson, Nigel Crisp Source Type: research

Moving nursing beyond p < .05
We write as a community of professional statisticians and quantitative methodologists with extensive collective experience in nursing research. Our group includes faculty in academic nursing programs, statistics reviewers for nursing research journals, statistics educators who teach nursing students, and statistics collaborators on nursing research studies. Members of our group have participated in expert panel discussions and presentations at international statistics conferences about the use of statistics in nursing research and education (Hayat, Eckardt Higgins, Kim,& Schmiege, 2013; Hayat, Higgins, Schwartz,& S...
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 27, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Matthew J. Hayat, Vincent S. Staggs, Todd A. Schwartz, Melinda Higgins, Andres Azuero, Chakra Budhathoki, Rameela Chandrasekhar, Paul Cook, Emily Cramer, Mary S. Dietrich, Mauricio Garnier-Villarreal, Alexandra Hanlon, Jianghua He, Jinxiang Hu, MyoungJin Source Type: research

Residential long-term care regulations: comparison between nursing homes and assisted living facilities
The long-term care (LTC) sector is a major component of the US health care system that continues to grow (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2014; Congressional Budget Office [CBO], 2013). Most of this increase is due to growth in the population of oldest adults (85+), a group with limited capacity for self-care due to health conditions (CBO, 2013; National Institute on Aging, [NIA], 2015). In 2014, there were over 46 million Americans 65+ years, and 6.2 million 85+ years old (Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics [FIFAS, 2016]). (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 27, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Alison M. Trinkoff, Jungmin Yoon, Carla L. Storr, Nancy B. Lerner, Bo Kyum Yang, Kihye Han Source Type: research

High Value Care for Older Adults with Complex Care Needs: Leveraging Nurses as Innovators
Both nationally and globally, the number of older adults (people 65 years of age or older) is growing faster than any other age group. There were 49.2 million older adults in the United States in 2016 and by 2060, that number is projected to almost double to 98 million. (Administration on Aging) Most older adults in the United States have at least one chronic health condition, and close to half of this group are living with four or more chronic conditions. (Buttorff et al., 2017) The presence of multiple chronic conditions (MCCs) in the older adult population introduces many challenges. (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 27, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: George Demiris, Nancy A. Hodgson, Justine S. Sefcik, Jasmine L. Travers, Miranda Varrassee McPhillips, Mary D. Naylor Source Type: research

Elements of the Healthy Work Environment Associated with Lower Primary Care Nurse Burnout
Work stress and burnout are significant concerns in nursing, as they not only affect individual nurses personally and professionally, but also the organizations in which they are employed and the patients they care for (Jennings, 2008). Nurse burnout has been linked to lower quality of care, poorer patient safety and health outcomes, and lower patient satisfaction (Cimiotti, Aiken, Sloane,& Wu, 2012; McHugh, Kutney-Lee, Cimiotti, Sloane,& Aiken, 2011; Poghosyan, Clark, Finlayson,& Aiken, 2010). (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 27, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Linda Y. Kim, Danielle E. Rose, David A. Ganz, Karleen F. Giannitrapani, Elizabeth M. Yano, Lisa V. Rubenstein, Susan E. Stockdale Source Type: research

The Future of Pediatric Nursing Science
Excellence in pediatric nursing is characterized by the use of research to enable practice based on evidence for providing safe and effective nursing care to children and their families (Christian, 2011; McCarthy& Sperhac, 2011). We contend that the ability of the nursing profession to advance excellence and adequately address the growing healthcare needs of children using evidence-based practice is at risk because of an inadequate number of PhD-prepared pediatric research scientists. (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 27, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Tondi M. Harrison, Deborah Steward, Sharon Tucker, Christine A. Fortney, Lisa K. Militello, Laureen H. Smith, Susan Thrane, Heather L. Tubbs-Cooley, Rita H. Pickler Source Type: research

Nursing Advocacy to Lead the United Nations Sustainable Development Agenda
Nurses and midwives are primed to lead the charge toward achieving health equity, environmental sustainability, and social justice for a world of peace and thriving. In September 2015, all 193 Member States of the United Nations (UN) General Assembly unanimously adopted a transnational initiative focused on improving and safeguarding the well-being of all persons, populations, species, ecosystems, and the planet at large. The UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development was implemented on January 1, 2016 and is composed of 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and further delineated by 169 targets (UN, 2016). (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 27, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: William E. Rosa, Ann E. Kurth, Eileen Sullivan-Marx, Judith Shamian, Holly K. Shaw, Lynda L. Wilson, Nigel Crisp Source Type: research

Perspectives of Public Health Nurses on the Ethics of Mandated Vaccine Education
Research about health care professionals ’ communication with families that refuse routine childhood immunizations tends to focus on physicians (Henrikson et al., 2015; Opel et al., 2013). However, nurses are often tasked to discuss vaccines with families, and they typically administer vaccines more regularly than do physicians in pediat ric and family care contexts (Deem, 2017, 2018; Hoekstra& Margolis, 2016). Furthermore, some political communities have tasked their public health nurses with providing immunization education to families seeking to send their unvaccinated or under-vaccinated children to daycare o...
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 27, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Mark C. Navin, Andrea T. Kozak, Michael J. Deem Source Type: research

Analgesic Nonadherence for Cancer Pain in a Time of Opioid Crisis: A Concept Analysis
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC; 2018), an estimated 68% of the 70,200 drug overdose deaths in the United States (US) in 2017 involved the use of an opioid. In fact, the number of drug overdose deaths that implicated opioids increased six-fold between 1999 and 2017 (CDC, 2018). In the current climate of the opioid addiction epidemic, various stakeholders are calling for tighter opioid access policies, more rigorous prescribing standards, and increasingly tailored patient and community education mechanisms (Christie et al., 2017; National Academies of Sciences [NAS], 2017; National Academy o...
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 27, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: William E. Rosa, Barbara Riegel, Connie M. Ulrich, Lillian S. Brunner, Salimah H. Meghani Source Type: research

Moving Nursing beyond p < .05
We write as a community of professional statisticians and quantitative methodologists with extensive collective experience in nursing research. Our group includes faculty in academic nursing programs, statistics reviewers for nursing research journals, statistics educators who teach nursing students, and statistics collaborators on nursing research studies. Members of our group have participated in expert panel discussions and presentations at international statistics conferences about the use of statistics in nursing research and education (Hayat et al., 2013; Hayat et al., 2014). (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 27, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Matthew J. Hayat, Vincent S. Staggs, Todd A. Schwartz, Melinda Higgins, Andres Azuero, Chakra Budhathoki, Rameela Chandrasekhar, Paul Cook, Emily Cramer, Mary S. Dietrich, Mauricio Garnier-Villarreal, Alexandra Hanlon, Jianghua He, Jinxiang Hu, MyoungJin Source Type: research

The framework for developing nursing specialist roles in the health care system of Iran
Nurses constitute the largest proportion of workforce in health care systems and play significant roles in health care delivery. Their traditional role is dependent task performance. In this role, they need to perform their roles and practice their skills based on the biomedical care model, that is, in response to physicians ’ orders (Katzman& Roberts, 1988). However, the scope of nursing practice has also broadened and currently includes specialist roles due to the increasing importance of quality care delivery, changes in disease trends, increasing burden of chronic illnesses, the growth of aging population, an...
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 26, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Alireza Irajpour, Parvaneh Khorasani, Maryam Bagheri, Azam Eshaghian, Elaheh Sadat Ziaee, Zahra Saberi, Atefeh Afshari Source Type: research

The framework for developing nursing specialist roles in the healthcare system of Iran
Nurses constitute the largest proportion of workforce in healthcare systems and play significant roles in healthcare delivery. Their traditional role is dependent task performance. In this role, they need to perform their roles and practice their skills based on the biomedical care model, i.e. in response to physicians ’ orders (Katzman and Roberts, 1988). However, the scope of nursing practice has also broadened and currently include specialist roles due to the increasing importance of quality care delivery, changes in disease trends, increasing burden of chronic illnesses, the growth of aging population, and a dvan...
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 26, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Alireza Irajpour, Parvaneh Khorasani, Maryam Bagheri, Azam Eshaghian, Elaheh Sadat Ziaee, Zahra Saberi, Atefeh Afshari Source Type: research

Views of Regulatory Authorities on Standards to Assure Quality in Online Nursing Education
Advances in information technology have resulted in the uptake of online education across different disciplines and fields of studies. Conventionally called “online learning,” this modality is available for students at all education levels as evidenced by early media literacy training (Ferdig& Kennedy, 2014; Schmidt, 2013), particularly in postsecondary health professional programs (George et al., 2014). The percentage of students enrolled in various distance undergraduate classes grew from 8% in 2000 to 20% in 2008 and almost a fourth of college graduates report taking an online class (Parker, Moore,& ...
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 26, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Sabianca Delva, Manka Nkimbeng, Sotera Chow, Susan Renda, Hae-Ra Han, Rita D'Aoust Source Type: research

Leadership Corner
Linda Burnes Bolton, DrPH, RN, FAAN (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 22, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Veronica D. Feeg Source Type: research

Precision Health: Emerging Science for Nursing Research
The Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science (CANS) held its biennial State of the Science Conference in September 2018. The conference focused on Precision Health, an emerging science with critical implications for nursing research, practice, and education. These comments summarize the planning and proceedings of the conference, introduce the articles in this special issue focused on precision health, and discuss implications for nursing science. (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 21, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Eileen Danaher Hacker, Ann Marie McCarthy, Holli DeVon Source Type: research

Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science's 2018 State of the Science Conference on Precision Health
The Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science (CANS) held its biennial State of the Science Conference in September 2018. The conference focused on Precision Health, an emerging science with critical implications for nursing research, practice and education. These comments summarize the planning and proceedings of the conference, introduce the articles in this special issue focused on precision health, and discuss implications for nursing science. (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 21, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Eileen Danaher Hacker, Ann Marie McCarthy, Holli DeVon Source Type: research

A scoping review of safety management during clinical placements of undergraduate nursing students
This report described a scenario of 98,000 deaths per year resulting from failures in clinical safety and proposed a different approa ch to the question, switching attention towards prevention and detection, instead of the blame-assigning stance traditionally adopted (Kohn, Corrigan,& Molla, 1999). (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 18, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: M. Garc ía-Gámez, J.M. Morales-Asencio, S. García-Mayor, S. Kaknani-Uttumchandani, C. Marti-Garcia, I. Lopez-Leiva, Á. León-Campos, E. Fernandez-Ordoñez, A. García-Guerrero, M.R. Iglesias-Parra Source Type: research

Increased Adoption of Smoke-free Policies on Campuses with Schools of Nursing
Tobacco use and exposure to secondhand smoke, the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the United States (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services), are an important focus for nursing leaders (Sarna et al., 2013). Policies that create smoke-free environments on college/university campuses are effective in denormalizing tobacco use and promoting quitting (Fallin, Roditis,& Glantz, 2015, Seo, Macy, Torabi,& Middlestadt, 2011). Such policies ban the use of tobacco products, many including vaping or electronic cigarettes, on campus. (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 18, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Linda Sarna, Patricia J. Hollen, Janie Heath, Stella Aguinaga Bialous Source Type: research

Describing Advanced Practice Provider Roles within Critical Care Teams with Tele-ICUs: Exemplars from Seven U.S. Health Systems
This article reviews current and evolving roles for advanced practice providers in telehealth in acute and critical care settings across 7 healthcare systems in the United States. (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 18, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Teresa A. Rincon, Vishal Bakshi, William Beninati, Dawn Carpenter, Eric Cucchi, Theresa M. Davis, Jennifer Dreher, Cheryl Hiddleson, Marcia K. Johansson, Adam W. Katz, Carol Olff, Edward A. Wansor, Denise Ward, Vanessa Washington, Fiona Winter Bottom, Rut Source Type: research

American Academy of Nursing Policy Brief: Military sexual trauma
The Ike Skelton National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 (Public Law 111-383-Jan. 7, 2011; Sec. 1631) mandates the Secretary of Defense to submit an “annual report [to Congress] regarding sexual assaults involving members of the armed forces and improvement to sexual assault prevention and response program.” In compliance, the Department of Defense (DoD) Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office (SAPRO) released several reports. The Annu al Report on Sexual Harassment and Violence at the Military Service Academies (MSAs) for Academic Program Year (APY) 2016-2017 (DoD SAPRO, 2018a) was th...
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 18, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Marie Marino, Kelly A. Wolgast, Patricia M. Speck, Deborah J. Kenny, Helene Moriarty Source Type: research

Advocacy and actions to address disparities in access to genomic health care: A report on a National Academy of Medicine workshop
Clinically actionable genomic research discoveries can improve health and wellbeing of people when they are at risk for, or have conditions with a major genomic component. There are benefits when participants in the research represent the clinical populations who are most likely to gain from the discoveries. However, that is not sufficient. Dr. Patricia Brennan, Director of the United States (US) National Library of Medicine recently noted that discoveries have little value if not delivered to the underserved (2018). (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 17, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Janet K. Williams, Vence L. Bonham, Catherine Wicklund, Bernice Coleman, Jacquelyn Y. Taylor, Ann K. Cashion Source Type: research

Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science: News from the Chair
Summer brings a sense of optimism and energy which well represents the sentiments of the Council Leadership following a very productive spring which included our annual face-to-face meeting at the Academy Headquarters in Washington, DC. We are excited about our new initiatives and future growth. My deep gratitude goes to the members of our partner organizations as well as our elected members who make up the Leadership Council. Here is a list for your information. Please feel free to contact any of us with your thoughts and ideas to advance the Council and nursing science. (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 12, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Holli A. DeVon Source Type: research

Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science News from the Chair
Summer brings a sense of optimism and energy which well represents the sentiments of the Council Leadership following a very productive spring which included our annual face to face meeting at the Academy Headquarters in Washington, DC. We are excited about our new initiatives and future growth. My deep gratitude goes to the members of our partner organizations as well as our elected members who make up the Leadership Council. Here is a list for your information. Please feel free to contact any of us with your thoughts and ideas to advance the Council and nursing science. (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - June 12, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Holli A. DeVon, Nancy Redeker, Nancy Fahrenwald, Judith Erlen, Anna Alt-White, Yvonne Bryan, Patricia Underwood, Victoria Vaughan Dickson, Cindy Anderson, Demetrius Porche, Paula Meek, Rachael James Source Type: research

Emotional distress in mothers of early-preterm infants, late-preterm infants, and full-term infants in Malawi
Each year approximately 15 million preterm infants are born worldwide and one million of these infants die from complications of prematurity (World Health Organization, 2018). Malawi, a low-income country in sub-Saharan region of Africa, has the highest preterm birth rate in the world – estimated at 18.1 per 100 live births (World Health Organization, 2018). Preterm infants can be described as early-preterm [born before 34 weeks gestation] and late-preterm [34 0/6 to 36 6/7 weeks] (Brandon et al., 2011; Holditch-Davis et al., 2009; Miles, Holditch-Davis, Burchinal,& Nelson, 1999). (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - May 31, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Kaboni Whitney Gondwe, Debra Brandon, Qing Yang, William F. Malcom, Maria J. Small, Diane Holditch-Davis Source Type: research

Precision health research and implementation reviewed through the conNECT framework
This paper is based on a symposium presented at the Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science conference in 2018. Precision medicine is a current buzz word with millions of dollars invested in innovative strategies to prevent and treat disease that are tailored to the individual. We posit that precision health is more encompassing than precision medicine, in that it extends beyond precision in prescriptive therapies or identifying genetic risks. Rather, it incorporates the understanding of complex interactions among the myriad factors that influence health and health outcomes of patients and families. (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - May 30, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Usha Menon, Elizabeth Cohn, Charles A. Downs, Sheila M. Gephart, Laura Redwine Source Type: research

Precision Health Research and Implementation Reviewed Through Five Synergistic Principles
This paper is based on a symposium presented at the Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science conference in 2018. Precision medicine is a current buzz word with millions of dollars invested in innovative strategies to prevent and treat disease that are tailored to the individual. We posit that precision health is more encompassing than precision medicine, in that it extends beyond precision in prescriptive therapies or identifying genetic risks. Rather, it incorporates the understanding of complex interactions among the myriad factors that influence health and health outcomes of patients and families. (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - May 30, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Usha Menon PhD, Elizabeth Cohn PhD, Charles A. Downs, Sheila M. Gephart, Laura Redwine Source Type: research

Reports of three organizations ’ members about doctor of nursing practice project experiences and outcomes
The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) is an established clinical doctorate that was envisioned by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing to enhance nurses ’ abilities to improve nursing practice and patient outcomes (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 2006, 2015). The DNP Essentials document identified the DNP graduate as practicing at the most advanced level of nursing, with a focus on improving health outcomes for individuals or populati ons (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 2006). (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - May 28, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Ann F. Minnick, Ruth Kleinpell, Terri L. Allison Source Type: research

Reports of three organizations ’ members about DNP project experiences and outcomes
The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) is an established clinical doctorate that was envisioned by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) to enhance nurses ’ abilities to improve nursing practice and patient outcomes (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 2006, 2015). The DNP Essentials document identified the DNP graduate as practicing at the most advanced level of nursing, with a focus on improving health outcomes for individuals or populati ons (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 2006). (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - May 28, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Ann F. Minnick, Ruth Kleinpell, Terri L. Allison Source Type: research

Ways of Knowing in Precision Health
In 1978, Carper published her landmark paper on the fundamental ways of knowing in nursing. Carper classified patterns of knowing used to develop knowledge and theory to guide practice: empirical, personal, ethical, and esthetic (Carper, 1978). Only empirical knowledge resulted from science. Personal knowledge resulted from personal self-understanding and empathy, while ethical knowledge developed from an awareness of moral questions and choices. Esthetic knowledge, often referred to as “the art of nursing,” came from an awareness of the immediate situation while being embedded in immediate practical action, (S...
Source: Nursing Outlook - May 28, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Elizabeth Corwin, Nancy S. Redeker, Therese S. Richmond, Sharron L. Docherty, Rita H. Pickler Source Type: research

The Future of Nursing and the Advancement of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals
On January 1, 2016, the United Nations (UN) 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development was enacted following unanimous adoption by all Member States of the UN General Assembly just months earlier (UN, 2016). This Agenda - arguably the most ambitious transnational initiative in history - is comprised of 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and 169 targets that seek to create a world of safety and inclusion by promoting multisector partnerships within and between nations. The SDGs are based on five major themes considered essential for long-term human well-being and survival: People, Planet, Peace, Prosperity, and Partnershi...
Source: Nursing Outlook - May 21, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: William E. Rosa, Elizabeth Iro Source Type: research

Health Care Innovations Across Practice and Academia: A Theoretical Framework
The current imperative to innovate in health care systems challenges all nurses in practice and provides unique challenges in complex organizations. Berkowitz (2017) suggested the development of partnerships across academic health sciences and health care organizations is necessary for innovation and emphasized the part of leaders in education, research, and practice. The current innovation agenda requires leadership using variables that influence human interaction such as decision-making, innovation, technology, and direction (Porter-O'Grady& Malloch, 2015). (Source: Nursing Outlook)
Source: Nursing Outlook - May 20, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: M. Lindell Joseph, Heather Bair, Michele Williams, Diane L. Huber, Sue Moorhead, Kirsten Hanrahan, Howard Butcher, Nai-Ching Chi Source Type: research