The Hebb repetition effect in complex span tasks: Evidence for a shared learning mechanism with simple span tasks
Mem Cognit. 2021 Dec 6. doi: 10.3758/s13421-021-01261-3. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTThe Hebb repetition effect on serial-recall task refers to the improvement in the accuracy of recall of a repeated list (e.g., repeated in every 3 trials) over random non-repeated lists. Previous research has shown that both temporal position and neighboring items need to be the same on each repetition list for the Hebb repetition effect to occur, suggesting chunking as one of its underlying mechanisms. Accordingly, one can expect absence of the Hebb repetition effect in a complex span task, given that the sequence is interrupted by dist...
Source: Memory and Cognition - December 6, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Claudia Araya Klaus Oberauer Satoru Saito Source Type: research

Can cue familiarity during recall failure prompt illusory recollective experience?
We examined the hypothesis that as perceived cue familiarity increases during the uncertainty of target retrieval failure, so does illusory recollection of a contextual detail. Toward this end, we systematically varied the amount of cue-to-target(s) surface feature-overlap in the recognition without cued recall paradigm, which has been shown to increase perceived cue familiarity during target recall failure. Increasing perceived cue familiarity during target retrieval failure led to increased confidence in knowing a contextual detail that was not actually known. As perceived cue familiarity increased, so did erroneous conf...
Source: Memory and Cognition - December 2, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Andrew M Huebert Katherine L McNeely-White Anne M Cleary Source Type: research

Soliciting judgments of forgetting reactively enhances memory as well as making judgments of learning: Empirical and meta-analytic tests
Mem Cognit. 2021 Dec 2. doi: 10.3758/s13421-021-01258-y. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTRecent studies found that making judgments of learning (JOLs) can reactively facilitate memory, a phenomenon termed the reactivity effect of JOLs. The current study was designed to explore (1) whether making judgments of forgetting (JOFs) can also enhance memory and (2) whether there is any difference between the reactivity effects of JOFs and JOLs. Experiment 1 found that soliciting JOFs significantly enhanced retention of single words. Experiments 2 and 3 observed minimal difference in reactivity effects between JOFs and JOLs on learni...
Source: Memory and Cognition - December 2, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Baike Li Wenbo Zhao Jun Zheng Xiao Hu Ningxin Su Tian Fan Yue Yin Meng Liu Chunliang Yang Liang Luo Source Type: research

Can cue familiarity during recall failure prompt illusory recollective experience?
We examined the hypothesis that as perceived cue familiarity increases during the uncertainty of target retrieval failure, so does illusory recollection of a contextual detail. Toward this end, we systematically varied the amount of cue-to-target(s) surface feature-overlap in the recognition without cued recall paradigm, which has been shown to increase perceived cue familiarity during target recall failure. Increasing perceived cue familiarity during target retrieval failure led to increased confidence in knowing a contextual detail that was not actually known. As perceived cue familiarity increased, so did erroneous conf...
Source: Memory and Cognition - December 2, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Andrew M Huebert Katherine L McNeely-White Anne M Cleary Source Type: research

Soliciting judgments of forgetting reactively enhances memory as well as making judgments of learning: Empirical and meta-analytic tests
Mem Cognit. 2021 Dec 2. doi: 10.3758/s13421-021-01258-y. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTRecent studies found that making judgments of learning (JOLs) can reactively facilitate memory, a phenomenon termed the reactivity effect of JOLs. The current study was designed to explore (1) whether making judgments of forgetting (JOFs) can also enhance memory and (2) whether there is any difference between the reactivity effects of JOFs and JOLs. Experiment 1 found that soliciting JOFs significantly enhanced retention of single words. Experiments 2 and 3 observed minimal difference in reactivity effects between JOFs and JOLs on learni...
Source: Memory and Cognition - December 2, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Baike Li Wenbo Zhao Jun Zheng Xiao Hu Ningxin Su Tian Fan Yue Yin Meng Liu Chunliang Yang Liang Luo Source Type: research

Can cue familiarity during recall failure prompt illusory recollective experience?
We examined the hypothesis that as perceived cue familiarity increases during the uncertainty of target retrieval failure, so does illusory recollection of a contextual detail. Toward this end, we systematically varied the amount of cue-to-target(s) surface feature-overlap in the recognition without cued recall paradigm, which has been shown to increase perceived cue familiarity during target recall failure. Increasing perceived cue familiarity during target retrieval failure led to increased confidence in knowing a contextual detail that was not actually known. As perceived cue familiarity increased, so did erroneous conf...
Source: Memory and Cognition - December 2, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Andrew M Huebert Katherine L McNeely-White Anne M Cleary Source Type: research

Soliciting judgments of forgetting reactively enhances memory as well as making judgments of learning: Empirical and meta-analytic tests
Mem Cognit. 2021 Dec 2. doi: 10.3758/s13421-021-01258-y. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTRecent studies found that making judgments of learning (JOLs) can reactively facilitate memory, a phenomenon termed the reactivity effect of JOLs. The current study was designed to explore (1) whether making judgments of forgetting (JOFs) can also enhance memory and (2) whether there is any difference between the reactivity effects of JOFs and JOLs. Experiment 1 found that soliciting JOFs significantly enhanced retention of single words. Experiments 2 and 3 observed minimal difference in reactivity effects between JOFs and JOLs on learni...
Source: Memory and Cognition - December 2, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Baike Li Wenbo Zhao Jun Zheng Xiao Hu Ningxin Su Tian Fan Yue Yin Meng Liu Chunliang Yang Liang Luo Source Type: research

Can cue familiarity during recall failure prompt illusory recollective experience?
We examined the hypothesis that as perceived cue familiarity increases during the uncertainty of target retrieval failure, so does illusory recollection of a contextual detail. Toward this end, we systematically varied the amount of cue-to-target(s) surface feature-overlap in the recognition without cued recall paradigm, which has been shown to increase perceived cue familiarity during target recall failure. Increasing perceived cue familiarity during target retrieval failure led to increased confidence in knowing a contextual detail that was not actually known. As perceived cue familiarity increased, so did erroneous conf...
Source: Memory and Cognition - December 2, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Andrew M Huebert Katherine L McNeely-White Anne M Cleary Source Type: research

Soliciting judgments of forgetting reactively enhances memory as well as making judgments of learning: Empirical and meta-analytic tests
Mem Cognit. 2021 Dec 2. doi: 10.3758/s13421-021-01258-y. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTRecent studies found that making judgments of learning (JOLs) can reactively facilitate memory, a phenomenon termed the reactivity effect of JOLs. The current study was designed to explore (1) whether making judgments of forgetting (JOFs) can also enhance memory and (2) whether there is any difference between the reactivity effects of JOFs and JOLs. Experiment 1 found that soliciting JOFs significantly enhanced retention of single words. Experiments 2 and 3 observed minimal difference in reactivity effects between JOFs and JOLs on learni...
Source: Memory and Cognition - December 2, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Baike Li Wenbo Zhao Jun Zheng Xiao Hu Ningxin Su Tian Fan Yue Yin Meng Liu Chunliang Yang Liang Luo Source Type: research

Living-in-history effect in the dating of important autobiographical memories
Mem Cognit. 2021 Nov 30:1-12. doi: 10.3758/s13421-021-01250-6. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTThe tendency of a person to frequently use public (i.e., historical) events as temporal landmarks when dating personal memories is termed the living-in-history (LiH) effect. We investigated the LiH effect in autobiographical memories of Bangladeshi older adults who lived through the 1960s Bengali nationalist movement and the 1971 Bangladesh War of Independence. 476 participants (mean age = 67.16 years; SD = 5.96 years), including 62 independence war veterans, retrieved and dated three important memories from their life and complete...
Source: Memory and Cognition - November 30, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Azharul Islam Shamsul Haque Source Type: research

Inferences from the negation of counterfactual and semifactual conditionals
Mem Cognit. 2021 Nov 30:1-13. doi: 10.3758/s13421-021-01252-4. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTOur goal was to study how people understand the negation of counterfactuals (such as "Antonio denied/said that it is false that if Messi had played, then Barcelona would have won") and semifactuals (such as "Antonio denied that even if Messi had played, Barcelona would have won"). Previous studies have shown that participants negated basic conditionals using small-scope interpretations by endorsing a new conditional with the negated consequent, but also by making large-scope interpretations, endorsing a conjunct...
Source: Memory and Cognition - November 30, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Orlando Espino Isabel Orenes Sergio Moreno-R íos Source Type: research

Living-in-history effect in the dating of important autobiographical memories
Mem Cognit. 2021 Nov 30:1-12. doi: 10.3758/s13421-021-01250-6. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTThe tendency of a person to frequently use public (i.e., historical) events as temporal landmarks when dating personal memories is termed the living-in-history (LiH) effect. We investigated the LiH effect in autobiographical memories of Bangladeshi older adults who lived through the 1960s Bengali nationalist movement and the 1971 Bangladesh War of Independence. 476 participants (mean age = 67.16 years; SD = 5.96 years), including 62 independence war veterans, retrieved and dated three important memories from their life and complete...
Source: Memory and Cognition - November 30, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Azharul Islam Shamsul Haque Source Type: research

Inferences from the negation of counterfactual and semifactual conditionals
Mem Cognit. 2021 Nov 30:1-13. doi: 10.3758/s13421-021-01252-4. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTOur goal was to study how people understand the negation of counterfactuals (such as "Antonio denied/said that it is false that if Messi had played, then Barcelona would have won") and semifactuals (such as "Antonio denied that even if Messi had played, Barcelona would have won"). Previous studies have shown that participants negated basic conditionals using small-scope interpretations by endorsing a new conditional with the negated consequent, but also by making large-scope interpretations, endorsing a conjunct...
Source: Memory and Cognition - November 30, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Orlando Espino Isabel Orenes Sergio Moreno-R íos Source Type: research

Is motor activity the key to the observation-inflation effect? The role of action simulation
This study provides strong evidence that action simulation influences the generation of observation-inflation effects and that the process is continuous and can refer to further action information.PMID:34843083 | DOI:10.3758/s13421-021-01259-x (Source: Memory and Cognition)
Source: Memory and Cognition - November 29, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Lijuan Wang Yang Chen Yaqi Yue Source Type: research

Accounting for item-level variance in recognition memory: Comparing word frequency and contextual diversity
Mem Cognit. 2021 Nov 22. doi: 10.3758/s13421-021-01249-z. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTContextual diversity modifies word frequency by ignoring the repetition of words in context (Adelman, Brown, & Quesada, 2006, Psychological Science, 17(9), 814-823). Semantic diversity modifies contextual diversity by taking into account the uniqueness of the contexts that a word occurs in when calculating lexical strength (Jones, Johns, & Recchia, 2012, Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology, 66, 115-124). Recent research has demonstrated that measures based on contextual and semantic diversity provide a considerable impro...
Source: Memory and Cognition - November 23, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Brendan T Johns Source Type: research

Stimuli with a positive valence can facilitate cognitive control
Mem Cognit. 2021 Nov 18. doi: 10.3758/s13421-021-01257-z. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTIn the process of interacting with people and objects, humans assign affective valence. By using an association-transfer paradigm, the current study investigated whether the emotion associated with a stimulus would have an impact on cognitive control outcomes. During the association phase of two experiments reported here, participants identified the emotion expressed by an actor's face as either positive (i.e., smiling) or negative (i.e., frowning). Half of the actors expressed positive emotions (MP) on 80% of trials, while the other ha...
Source: Memory and Cognition - November 18, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Jini Tae Rebecca B Weldon Rebeka C Almasi Christine An Yoonhyoung Lee Myeong-Ho Sohn Source Type: research

Can the Stroop effect serve as the gold standard of conflict monitoring and control? A conceptual critique
Mem Cognit. 2021 Nov 11. doi: 10.3758/s13421-021-01251-5. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTThe Stroop effect has been a key to the assay of selective attention since the time of the epoch-making study by J.R. Stroop almost a century ago. However, recent work based on computational modeling and recording of brain activations ignored the primary meaning of the Stroop effect as a measure of selectivity-with the Stroop test losing its raison d'être. Espousing the new framework, numerous studies in the past 20 years conceived performance in the Stroop task in terms of conflict-induced adjustments governed by central control ...
Source: Memory and Cognition - November 12, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Daniel Algom Daniel Fitousi Eran Chajut Source Type: research

Learning new words: Memory reactivation as a mechanism for strengthening and updating a novel word's meaning
Mem Cognit. 2021 Nov 9. doi: 10.3758/s13421-021-01247-1. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTIn the present study we explored the postlearning changes in a novel word's definition using a cue-induced memory reactivation. Native speakers of Spanish (N = 373) learned low-frequency words with their corresponding definitions. The following day, reactivated groups were exposed to a reminder and provided a subjective assessment of reactivation for each word, while control groups did not receive a reactivation. Study A demonstrated that memory reactivation enhances both explicit recall and semantic integration of new meanings. Study B ...
Source: Memory and Cognition - November 9, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Julieta Laurino Cecilia Forcato Nicole Coaker Mar ía Eugenia Pedreira Laura Kaczer Source Type: research

Selecting effectively contributes to the mnemonic benefits of self-generated cues
Mem Cognit. 2021 Nov 2. doi: 10.3758/s13421-021-01245-3. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTSelf-generated memory cues support recall of target information more robustly than memory cues generated by others. Across two experiments, we tested whether the benefit of self-generated cues in part reflects a meta-mnemonic effect rather than a pure generation effect. In other words, can learners select better memory cues for themselves than others can? Participants generated as many possible memory cues for each to-be-remembered target as they could and then selected the cue they thought would be most effective. Self-selected memory c...
Source: Memory and Cognition - November 3, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Jonathan G Tullis Scott H Fraundorf Source Type: research

Individual Differences in Disqualifying Monitoring Underlie False Recognition of Associative and Conjunction Lures
Mem Cognit. 2021 Oct 28. doi: 10.3758/s13421-021-01243-5. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTThe current study leveraged experimental and individual differences methodology to examine whether false memories across different list-learning tasks arise from a common cause. Participants completed multiple false memory (associative and conjunction lure), working memory (operation and reading span), and source monitoring (verbal and picture) tasks. Memory discriminability in the associative and conjunction tasks loaded onto a single (general) factor and were unaffected by warnings provided at encoding. Consistent with previous resear...
Source: Memory and Cognition - October 29, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: B Hunter Ball Matthew K Robison Allison Coulson Gene A Brewer Source Type: research

The impact of cognitive load on prospective and retrospective time estimates at long durations: An investigation using a visual and memory search paradigm
Mem Cognit. 2021 Oct 15. doi: 10.3758/s13421-021-01241-7. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTAs human beings, we are bound by time. It is essential for daily functioning, and yet our ability to keep track of time is influenced by a myriad of factors (Block & Zakay, 1997, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 4[2], 184-197). First and foremost, time estimation has been found to depend on whether participants estimate the time prospectively or retrospectively (Hicks et al., 1976, The American Journal of Psychology, 89[4], 719-730). However, there is a paucity of research investigating differences between these two conditions in ...
Source: Memory and Cognition - October 16, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Jesika A Walker Mohammed Aswad Guy Lacroix Source Type: research