Editorial Board
(Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - February 14, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research

Contents
(Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - February 14, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research

Impressive clinical response to anti-PD-1 therapy in epithelioid mesothelioma with high clonal PD-L1 expression and EML4-ALK rearrangement
Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare, aggressive tumor originating from mesothelial cells. It is associated with exposure to asbestos, mainly occupational, rarely environmental or domestic. Diagnosis is usually made at an advanced stage because symptoms are non-specific and late. The management of this tumor is challenging and outcome is poor. Therapeutic strategies are mainly based on surgery with curative intent or palliative cytotoxic chemotherapy. Few patients are candidates for surgery which must necessarily take into account numerous factors (i.e. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - February 14, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Giuseppe Bronte, Angelo Delmonte, Marco Angelo Burgio, Alberto Verlicchi, Maurizio Puccetti, Sara Bravaccini, Paola Cravero, Maria Maddalena Tumedei, Danila Diano, Giulio Rossi, Paola Ulivi, Giovanni Martinelli, Lucio Crin ò Source Type: research

A phase II study of the combination of gemcitabine and imatinib mesylate in pemetrexed-pretreated patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma
Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is highly aggressive neoplasm, with a median survival of (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - February 13, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Paolo Andrea Zucali, Matteo Perrino, Fabio De Vincenzo, Laura Giordano, Nadia Cordua, Federica D ’Antonio, Armando Santoro Source Type: research

ATOM: A Phase II Study to Assess Efficacy of Preemptive Local Ablative Therapy to Residual Oligometastases of NSCLC After EGFR TKI
Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) are highly effective treatment in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However the median progression free survival (PFS) lasts 9-13 months [1 –2]. Recently, studies demonstrated that second and third generation TKIs dacomitinib and osimertinib can both achieve a longer PFS compared to 1st generation TKIs [3–4]. Nevertheless, access to both agents is still limited in many countries due to the affordability and registration process. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - February 11, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Oscar S.H. Chan, Kwok Chi Lam, Jacky Y.C. Li, Frankie P.T. Choi, Catherine Y.H. Wong, Amy T.Y. Chang, Frankie Mo, Ki Wang, Rebecca M.W. Yeung, Tony S.K. Mok Source Type: research

Socioeconomic differences and lung cancer survival in Germany: Investigation based on population-based clinical cancer registration
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related death globally, accounting for approximately 1.76 million deaths in 2018. [1] Prognosis used to be generally very poor, with 5-year survival rates ranging between 10 and 20 % in different countries [2]. Numerous prognostic factors have been investigated which include tumor-related but also patient-related factors, as well as smoking status and cancer treatment [3]. For example, a later stage at diagnosis, male gender and current smoking at diagnosis have been shown to predict particularly poor prognosis in lung cancer patients. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - February 4, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Isabelle Finke, Gundula Behrens, Lars Schwettmann, Michael Gerken, Ron Pritzkuleit, Bernd Holleczek, Hermann Brenner, Lina Jansen, for the German Cancer Survival Working Group Source Type: research

Stepwise flowchart for decision making on sublobar resection through the estimation of spread through air space in early stage lung cancer1
Tumor spread through air space (STAS) is defined as tumor cells within air spaces in the surrounding lung parenchyma, beyond the edges of the main tumor [1]. STAS was first introduced in the 2015 WHO classification of lung cancer and was formally proposed as a new invasive pattern of adenocarcinoma at that time [2]. STAS is associated with lymphovascular invasion, solid predominant histology, and EGFR wild type [3]. It is a well-known negative prognostic factor that predicts a high risk of locoregional recurrence in lung adenocarcinomas and is closely associated with a reduction in both recurrence-free survival (RFS) and o...
Source: Lung Cancer - February 4, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Jee Won Suh, Yong Hyu Jeong, Arthur Cho, Dae Joon Kim, Kyoung Young Chung, Hyo Sup Shim, Chang Young Lee Source Type: research

sSurvival Comparison of Three Histological Subtypes of Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Population-based Propensity Score Matching Analysis
Worldwide, lung cancer is the most frequent diagnosed cancer and the leading cause of cancer-related mortality [1,2]. As one of the most common histologic subtypes of Lung cancer, the overall prevalence of lung squamous cell carcinoma is reported to be approximately 30%, composed of lung basaloid squamous cell carcinoma (BSCC), keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma (KSCC), and nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma (NKSCC). Of the three subtypes, BSCC is a relatively uncommon histological subtype, whose histopathologic and clinical features was first described by Brambilla ’s group in 1992 [3]. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - February 3, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Na An, Xuejiao Leng, Xue Wang, Yile Sun, Zhiwei Chen Source Type: research

Quantifying potential confounders of panel-based tumor mutational burden (TMB) measurement
Tumor mutational burden (TMB) has shown consistent predictive ability for immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) across several cancer types [1]. Meanwhile, accumulating data also suggest a longer overall survival for TMB-high cases among non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with a PD-1 blocker as their first or subsequent treatment line [2,3], while the association of TMB with survival in case of ICI-chemotherapy combinations, ICI doublets, or other cancers remains under investigation. TMB is most often defined as the total number of somatic missense mutations in the tumor exome, which reflects the degree of neoantigen...
Source: Lung Cancer - February 1, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Jan Budczies, Daniel Kazdal, Michael Allg äuer, Petros Christopoulos, Eugen Rempel, Nicole Pfarr, Wilko Weichert, Stefan Fröhling, Michael Thomas, Solange Peters, Volker Endris, Peter Schirmacher, Albrecht Stenzinger Source Type: research

Positive EGFR mutation status is a risk of recurrence in pN0 –1 lung adenocarcinoma when combined with pathological stage and histological subtype: a retrospective multi-center analysis
Lung adenocarcinoma without metastasis to the mediastinal lymph node or distant site is generally an indication for surgical resection. Recurrence can occur even after complete resection, and pathological stage (pStage) and/or histological subtype classification are utilized to predict the risk of recurrence. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations are one of the most common oncogenic driver mutations of lung adenocarcinoma [1,2] especially in Asia [3,4], and their prognostic implication in lung adenocarcinoma remains controversial. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - January 29, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Masaoki Ito, Yoshihiro Miyata, Yasuhiro Tsutani, Hiroyuki Ito, Haruhiko Nakayama, Kentaro Imai, Norihiko Ikeda, Morihito Okada Source Type: research

A multicenter study of thromboembolic events among patients diagnosed with ROS1-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer
Thromboembolism (TE) is a well-recognized complication among patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), occurring throughout the disease course with an incidence commonly reported between 10-15% and exceeding 20% in some populations. [1,2] TE in cancer patients is associated with worse prognosis [3]. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - January 22, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Marliese Alexander, B. Pharm, Nick Pavlakis, Thomas John, Rachel O'Connell, Steven Kao, Brett Hughes, Adrian Lee, Sarah A Hayes, Viive M Howell, Stephen J Clarke, Michael Millward, Kate Burbury, Benjamin Solomon, Malinda Itchins Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - January 16, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research

Contents
(Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - January 16, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research

Corrigendum to “Down-regulation of HSP27 sensitizes TRAIL-resistant tumor cell to TRAIL-induced apoptosis” [Lung Cancer 68 (1) (2010) 27–38]
The authors regret that there is a mistake in the original manuscript in the text mark of Fig. 8D, in which P53 should be marked as phospho-P53. Now we would like to provide a new Fig. 8D as follows. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - January 16, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Hongqin Zhuang, Weiwei Jiang, Wei Cheng, Kui Qian, Wei Dong, Lin Cao, Qilai Huang, Shufeng Li, Fei Dou, Jen-Fu Chiu, Xue-Xun Fang, Min Lu, Zi-Chun Hua Tags: Corrigendum Source Type: research

Cost-effectiveness of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy versus Video Assisted Thoracic Surgery in medically operable stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A modeling study
Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) has a relatively good prognosis of 81% (stage IA) or 73% (stage IB) 5-year survival following curative treatments[1]. The most commonly used procedures follow current guidelines, which suggest operable patients should preferably be treated with the appropriate thoracoscopic resection technique with Video Assisted Thoracic Surgery (VATS), while Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) is preferred in inoperable patients.[2 –4] These guidelines are based on current evidence, although there is disagreement whether there is equipoise for operable patients between SBRT and VATS...
Source: Lung Cancer - January 16, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Henri B. Wolff, Leonie Alberts, Naomi van der Linden, Mathilda L. Bongers, Naomi E. Verstegen, Frank J. Lagerwaard, Frederik N. Hofman, Carin A. Uyl-de Groot, Suresh Senan, Sherif Y. El Sharouni, Elisabeth A. Kastelijn, Franz M.N.H. Schramel, Veerle M.H. Source Type: research

Neighborhood Context and Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Outcomes in Florida non-Elderly Patients by Race/Ethnicity
Lung cancer continues to be the deadliest cancer in the United States with an estimated 142,000 deaths and 228,000 new cases in 2019 accounting for approximately a quarter of all cancer deaths [1]. Cigarette smoking remains the single most important risk factor for lung cancer; 82% of all lung cancer cases in the US are attributed to it [2,3]. Several clinical patient-related factors are known to improve prognosis. These include early stage at diagnosis, younger age, smoking status, marital status, treatment, insurance status and socioeconomic status (SES) [4 –9]. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - January 16, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Asal Johnson, Allen Johnson, Robert Hines, Raheleh Mohammadi Source Type: research

WITHDRAWN: Patterns of care for patients with non-operable T1-4 N+ M0 non-small cell lung cancer in the US and outcomes with radiation or chemotherapy monotherapies
This article has been withdrawn at the request of the author(s) and/or editor. The Publisher apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause.The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at https://www.elsevier.com/about/our-business/policies/article-withdrawal (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - January 13, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Ellen Kim, Megan E. Daly, Kenneth Westover, Timur Mitin Source Type: research

Investigation of Efficacy and Acquired Resistance for EGFR-TKI plus Bevacizumab as First-Line Treatment in Patients with EGFR Sensitive Mutant Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in a Real World Population
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide [1]. A significant proportion of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), particularly those with adenocarcinoma histology, carry EGFR mutations, with about 15% in Caucasian adenocarcinoma and 50% in Asian adenocarcinoma are EGFR mutants [1 –3]. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been established as the standard therapy in the first-line treatment of advanced NSCLC with EGFR mutations. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - January 13, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Liang Zeng, Lili Xiao, Wenjuan Jiang, Haiyan Yang, Dandan Hu, Chen Xia, Yizhi Li, Chunhua Zhou, Yi Xiong, Li Liu, Dehua Liao, Rui Guan, Kunyan Li, Jing Wang, Yongchang Zhang, Nong Yang, Aaron S. Mansfield Source Type: research

Cytology for PD-L1 testing: a systematic review
Antibodies targeting the programmed cell death-1 (PD-1)/programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1) pathway have improved outcomes for patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and are now approved in several countries [1 –7]. As improved clinical outcomes with these antibodies are often associated with higher tumor PD-L1 expression levels in NSCLC [1,3,7,8], different PD-L1 expression cutoffs have been investigated in clinical trials and as part of the co-development of immunohistochemistry (IHC) assays. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - January 13, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: John R. Gosney, Anne-Marie Boothman, Marianne Ratcliffe, Keith M. Kerr Source Type: research

Patterns of care for patients with non-operable T1-4 N+ M0 non-small cell lung cancer in the US and outcomes with radiation or chemotherapy monotherapies
Treatment of patients with inoperable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), defined as lymph node-positive (N+) non-metastatic (M0), has improved tremendously since the first trial comparing radiation monotherapy (RTmono) to placebo [1]. Randomized trials established concurrent chemoradiation (CRT) as the standard of care for non-operable N  + M0 NSCLC [2–4]. However, in practice patients are excluded from this regimen because of a poor performance status, limited social support system, or patient refusal [5,6]. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - January 13, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Ellen Kim, Megan E. Daly, Kenneth Westover, Timur Mitin Source Type: research

Is it necessary to sample the contralateral nodal stations by EBUS-TBNA in patients with lung cancer and clinical N0 / N1 on PET-CT?
In patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), accurate mediastinal lymph node of staging becomes crucial to determine the prognosis of the disease and the choice of treatment (1). Computerized tomography (CT) and Positron Emission Tomography CT (PET/CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) are usually the initial non-invasive staging techniques, followed by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA), a minimally invasive procedure with great diagnostic accuracy (2). (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - January 13, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Pere Serra, Carmen Centeno, Jos é Sanz-Santos, Mohamed Torky, Sonia Baeza, Leire Mendiluce, Carlos Martínez-Barenys, Pedro López de Castro, Jorge Abad, Antoni Rosell, Felipe Andreo Source Type: research

Mutations in genes connected with the TCF7L2 transcription factor are associated with a poor prognosis in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
Personalized, or precision, medicine has transformed medical oncology for lung cancer patients. Personalized medicine involves the molecular characterization of a patient ’s tumor by targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) to direct treatment options that will provide the best outcome for the patient[1]. NGS sequencing for advanced lung cancer is now standard in clinics, and various commercial vendors provide clinical multiplexed NGS services. Clinical trials hav e shown the survival benefits of molecular profiling for those patients with the common actionable mutations, i.e. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - January 13, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Shawn J. Rice, Xin Liu, Victoria Hyland, Zhenqiu Liu, Chandra P. Belani Source Type: research

A systematic review of survival following anti-cancer treatment for small cell lung cancer
Systematic review of early and late survival in SCLCCauses of 30-day mortality following chemotherapy are exploredBetter survival following chemotherapy for Asian individuals with SCLCEarly thoracic radiotherapy and PCI augment survival for LD-SCLC but not ED-SCLC (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - January 11, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Gavin S Jones, Kelly Elimian, David R Baldwin, Richard Hubbard, Tricia M McKeever Source Type: research

Micropapillary pattern is associated with the development of brain metastases and the reduction of survival time in EGFR-mutation lung adenocarcinoma patients with surgery
Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for about 85% of all lung cancers [1], which are the leading cause of cancer-related morbidity and mortality worldwide [2]. With the use of Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) in NSCLC patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, the survival of lung cancer patients with EGFR mutation has significantly improved [3]. However, 40% patients develop brain metastases (BM) during the disease and the risk of BM is higher in NSCLC patients with EGFR mutation than in those with wild-type tumors [4,5]. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - January 10, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Changhui Li, Yinchen Shen, Fang Hu, Tianqing Chu, Xiaohua Yang, Jinchen Shao, Xiaoxuan Zheng, Jianlin Xu, Hai Zhang, Baohui Han, Hua Zhong, Xueyan Zhang Source Type: research

Randomized phase II study of chemoradiotherapy with cisplatin + S-1 versus cisplatin + pemetrexed for locally advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer: SPECTRA study
Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately 85 % of all cases of lung cancer. Among all cases of NSCLC, about two-thirds are already advanced and inoperable at the time of diagnosis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is the standard treatment for patients with unresectable locally advanced NSCLC. Chemotherapy at full systemic doses combined with thoracic radiotherapy (TRT) is employed to control the micro-metastases in such a condition. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - January 10, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Seiji Niho, Tatsuya Yoshida, Tetsuo Akimoto, Kentaro Sakamaki, Akira Ono, Takashi Seto, Makoto Nishio, Noboru Yamamoto, Toyoaki Hida, Hiroaki Okamoto, Takayasu Kurata, Miyako Satouchi, Koichi Goto, Takeharu Yamanaka, Yuichiro Ohe Source Type: research

Elucidation of the relationships of MET protein expression and gene copy number status with PD-L1 expression and the immune microenvironment in non-small cell lung cancer
Driver oncogenic mutations in genes such as EGFR and ALK are currently considered important therapeutic targets in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)[1,2]. Although driver-specific inhibitors have marked treatment effects on tumors with these driver alterations, tumors often develop resistance[3] and thus become difficult to treat. Recent research on immune-checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) immunotherapy has shed light on intractable cases, and ICI therapy has become one of the first-line treatment options of NSCLC without driver mutations[4]. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - January 7, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Katsuhiro Yoshimura, Yusuke Inoue, Kazuo Tsuchiya, Masato Karayama, Hidetaka Yamada, Yuji Iwashita, Akikazu Kawase, Masayuki Tanahashi, Hiroshi Ogawa, Naoki Inui, Kazuhito Funai, Kazuya Shinmura, Hiroshi Niwa, Takafumi Suda, Haruhiko Sugimura Source Type: research

COPD and lung cancer incidence in the Women ’s Health Initiative Observational Study: A brief report
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in both men and women in the United States, with an estimated 154,050 deaths expected to occur in 2018 [1]. Cigarette smoking has been linked to the development of lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) [2] and COPD has been found to be independently associated with an increased risk of developing lung cancer. A pooled analysis of 17 epidemiologic studies reported a 2.4-fold increase in risk of lung cancer associated with emphysema (ORmeta  = 2.44, 95% CI: 1.64, 3.62), and a 1.5-fold association with chronic bronchitis (ORmeta =...
Source: Lung Cancer - January 7, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Misako Nagasaka, Amy Lehman, Rowan Chlebowski, Brittany M. Haynes, Gloria Ho, Manali Patel, Lori C. Sakoda, Ann G. Schwartz, Michael S. Simon, Michele L. Cote Source Type: research

Cryobiopsy increases the EGFR detection rate in non-small cell lung cancer
Lung cancer ranks among the most common cancers worldwide with approximately 1.8 million patients in 2012 [1,2]. Non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents 75 –85% of all lung cancers. 2/3 of these patients are in non-curable stage III and IV at the time of diagnosis, and are usually treated systemically [3]. The current management of non-curable NSCLC has become more and more individualized and is based on immunohistochemical and molecular tumor charac terization [4]. In this context, EGFR mutation is currently the most relevant molecular-genetic alteration [5] since target therapies directed to activating EGFR m...
Source: Lung Cancer - January 6, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Maik Haentschel, Michael Boeckeler, Ahmed Ehab, Robert Wagner, Werner Spengler, Volker Steger, Hans Boesmueller, Marius Horger, Richard A. Lewis, Falko Fend, Lothar Kanz, Irina Bonzheim, Juergen Hetzel Source Type: research

Comment on: ‘Hospital lung surgery volume and patient outcomes’
The importance of hospital volume on the impact of surgery in patients with lung cancer has been observed in several studies. Higher volumes appear to be protective with suggested benefits including the higher use of surgical resection, higher rates of surgery in older patients, improved surgical technique, shorter hospital length of stay, lower readmission rates, fewer perioperative complications and improved survival [1 –6]. Hence, the assessment of the impact of hospital volume on cancer outcomes is of key importance. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - January 5, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Rob Stirling, Michael Stenger, John Zalcberg Source Type: research

Radiosurgery and Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Oligometastatic/Oligoprogressive Non-small Cell Lung Cancer patients: results of a multi-institutional series of 198 patients treated with “curative” intent
Treatment of stage IV Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) is rapidly evolving. Systemic chemotherapy, targeted therapy or immunotherapy represent the standard of care, depending on both disease biology and patient ’s characteristics. Results in terms of progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) range between 3-13 months and 5-25 months, respectively. [1–12] (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - January 5, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Michela Buglione, Barbara Alicja Jereczek-Fossa, Marco Lorenzo Bon ù, Davide Franceschini, Andrei Fodor, Isa Bossi Zanetti, Marianna Alessandra Gerardi, Paolo Borghetti, Davide Tomasini, Nadia Gisella Di Muzio, Olga Oneta, Marta Scorsetti, Ciro Franzese, Source Type: research

Hospital volume and the case for centralisation of surgical services
The importance of hospital volume on the impact of surgery in patients with lung cancer has been observed in several studies. Higher volumes appear to be protective with suggested benefits including the higher use of surgical resection, higher rates of surgery in older patients, improved surgical technique, shorter hospital length of stay, lower readmission rates, fewer perioperative complications and improved survival (1 –6). Hence, the assessment of the impact of hospital volume on cancer outcomes is of key importance. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - January 5, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Rob Stirling, Michael Stenger, John Zalcberg Source Type: research

Predicting Risk of Chemotherapy-induced Severe Neutropenia: A Pooled Analysis in Individual Patients Data with Advanced Lung Cancer
Neutropenia is a serious chemotherapy-induced hematologic toxicity in cancer patients. It is associated with both the risk of life-threatening infections and also chemotherapy dose reductions and delays that may compromise treatment outcomes [1]. In addition, studies have shown that health related quality of life is reduced in patients who develop neutropenia, especially those needing hospitalization [2,3]. Hence, it is important to try and estimate the risk of development of neutropenia in an attempt to try and minimize the impact on the patient ’s treatment plan. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - January 5, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Xiaowen Cao, Apar Kishor Ganti, Thomas Stinchcombe, Melisa L. Wong, James C. Ho, Chen Shen, Yingzhou Liu, Jeffery Crawford, Herbert Pang, Xiaofei Wang Source Type: research

Transformation of EML4-ALK fusion-positive adenocarcinoma into squamous cell carcinoma in association with acquired resistance to crizotinib
The development of targeted therapies has revolutionized the treatment of patients with lung cancer, especially non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a research hotspot of molecular targeted therapy for lung cancer. ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are highly effective for ALK-rearranged NSCLC-positive patients. These targeted therapies have significant clinical effects; however, they inevitably lead to acquired resistance. In previous studies, the histological transformation after ALK inhibitor treatment was mostly based on small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - January 2, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Fenfang Wang, Jing Qin, Fajun Xie, Qihuan Wu, Hongyang Lu Source Type: research

Immunotherapy rechallenge after nivolumab treatment in advanced non-small cell lung cancer in the real-world setting: A national data base analysis
Nivolumab is now a reference treatment for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after failure of prior platinum-based chemotherapy. Little data are available on treatment approaches following discontinuation of nivolumab and on the interest of a second course of immunotherapy after nivolumab discontinuation. The aims of this study were to describe treatment pathways following nivolumab discontinuation and to describe survival following retreatment with immunotherapy. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - December 31, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Matteo Giaj Levra, Fran çois-Emery Cotte, Romain Corre, Christophe Calvet, Anne-Françoise Gaudin, John R. Penrod, Valentine Grumberg, Baptiste Jouaneton, Ronan Jolivel, Jean-Baptiste Assie, Christos Chouaïd Source Type: research

A phase II trial of single oral FGF inhibitor, AZD4547, as second or third line therapy in malignant pleural mesothelioma
Systemic chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment for patients with unresectable malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). In 2003, the EMPHACIS trial established cisplatin and pemetrexed as the standard of care for first-line treatment of advanced mesothelioma [1]. More recently, the MAPS trial provided the first randomised demonstration of efficacy of a targeted therapy in mesothelioma, with the addition of bevacizumab to cisplatin and pemetrexed chemotherapy providing a small incremental survival benefit over chemotherapy alone, increasing median survival from16.1 to 18.8 months [2]. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - December 31, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Wei-Sen Lam, Jenette Creaney, Fred K. Chen, Wee Loong Chin, Sanjeevan Muruganandan, Sukanya Arunachalam, Mary S. Attia, Catherine Read, Kevin Murray, Michael Millward, Jon Spiro, Aron Chakera, Y.C. Gary Lee, Anna K. Nowak Source Type: research

Clearing of circulating tumour DNA predicts clinical response to first line tyrosine kinase inhibitors in advanced epidermal growth factor receptor mutated non-small cell lung cancer
The presence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) sensitizing mutations predicts suitability for first line EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). [1 –8] The recommended source for detection of EGFR mutations is a tumour biopsy, but mutations detected in circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) in the bloodstream can also be used for patient selection [9]. Several methods, with various benefits and disadvantages, exist for the detection of ctDNA [10,11]. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - December 30, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Eva Boysen Fynboe Ebert, Tine McCulloch, Karin Holmskov Hansen, Hanne Linnet, Boe Sorensen, Peter Meldgaard Source Type: research

Acknowledgement to Reviewers 2019
(Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - December 28, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research

Aims and Scope/Editorial Board
(Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - December 28, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research

Contents
(Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - December 28, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research

Effects of checkpoint inhibitors in advanced non-small cell lung cancer at population level from the National Immunotherapy Registry
Insight into the therapeutic results of checkpoint inhibitors are obtained from randomized trials and careful observations in population studies [1 –4] Phase III studies answer specific questions in selected patient groups with strict inclusion criteria. Patients participating in trials may show favorable outcome compared to patients not participating because of selection bias. When medical practice evolves, physicians will have a broader sel ection scope of patients and new questions will emerge e.g. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - December 28, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: H.J.M. Smit, J. Aerts, M. van den Heuvel, T.J.N. Hiltermann, I. Bahce, E.F. Smit, A-M.C. Dingemans, L.E. Hendriks, J.A. Stigt, F.M.N.H. Schramel, H. van Tinteren, H.J.M. Groen, On behalf of all participants of NVALT Immunotherapy Register Source Type: research

Osimertinib treatment for patients with EGFR exon 20 mutation positive non-small cell lung cancer
Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exon 20 insertion mutations are identified as a subset (4-12%) of EGFR mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and are the third most common category of EGFR activating mutations [1 –3]. EGFR exon 20 insertion mutations are heterogeneous at the molecular level but can be characterized as in-frame duplications (dup) or insertions (ins), or deletion/insertion (delins) mutations. EGFR exon 20 insertions are EGFR driver mutations that exhibit intrinsic resistance to first and sec ond generation EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) with overall response rates of only ...
Source: Lung Cancer - December 20, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: B. van Veggel, J.F. Vilacha Madeira R Santos, S.M.S. Hashemi, M.S. Paats, K. Monkhorst, D.A.M. Heideman, M. Groves, T. Radonic, E.F. Smit, E. Schuuring, A.J. van der Wekken, A.J. de Langen Source Type: research

Immune-related adverse events correlate with clinical outcomes in NSCLC patients treated with Nivolumab: the Italian NSCLC expanded access program
The management of patients with non-oncogen-driven non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has substantially changed thanks to the introduction of check-point inhibitors, mainly anti-PD1/PD-L1 monoclonal antibodies (Mabs), in every-day practice. These drugs represent a paradigm shift since they have not only boosted clinical research in the field of cancer immunotherapy, but have also completely changed perspective by putting not the tumor but the patient ’s immune system in the viewfinder of the treatment. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - December 20, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Editta Baldini, Alice Lunghi, Enrico Cortesi, Daniele Turci, Diego Signorelli, Valeria Stati, Barbara Melotti, Biagio Ricciuti, Antonio Frassoldati, Giampiero Romano, Giovanni Luca Ceresoli, Alfonso Illiano, Francesco Verderame, Gianpiero Fasola, Enrico R Source Type: research

Percutaneous CT-guided biopsy of lytic bone lesions in patients clinically suspected of lung cancer: diagnostic performances for pathological diagnosis and molecular testing
The management of advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has significantly improved in the last decades with the introduction of personalized treatments showing better efficacy than chemotherapy [1,2]. However, such treatments require precise histopathological subtyping of the tumor, molecular testing and PD-L1 (Programmed death-ligand 1) immunohistochemistry (IHC) to predict immune checkpoint inhibitor response. In cases of tumor progression, a rebiopsy is often performed with specific molecular testing to detect mechanisms of EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) or ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) inhibitor...
Source: Lung Cancer - December 19, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Anne-Claire Toffart, St éphane Asfari, Anne Mc Leer, Emilie Reymond, Adrien Jankowski, Denis Moro-Sibilot, Olivier Stephanov, Julien Ghelfi, Sylvie Lantuejoul, Gilbert R. Ferretti Source Type: research

Timing in Combination with Radiotherapy and Patterns of Disease Progression in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with EGFR-TKI
Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with a 5-year survival rate of only 18% for all stages combined. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents approximately 85% of all lung cancer cases. The discovery of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations has led NSCLC treatment into a new era with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-based therapy, which has become a standard of care, achieving a progression-free survival (PFS) of 9-10 months and an overall survival (OS) of 22-30 months [1 –4]. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - December 18, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Yi Tang, Bing Xia, Xiao Xu, Minna Zhang, Kan Wu, Bing Wang, Shenglin Ma Source Type: research

Upstaging, centrality and survival in early stage non-small cell lung cancer video-assisted surgery
In their interesting paper, Boada and colleagues [1] tried to answer the ongoing question of adequacy of Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) in performing lymphadenectomy for NSCLC. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - December 18, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Dania Nachira, Elisa Meacci, Maria Teresa Congedo, Marco Chiappetta, Leonardo Petracca-Ciavarella, Maria Letizia Vita, Stefano Margaritora Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Survival disparities following surgery among patients with different histological types of non-small cell lung cancer
Patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who undergo surgical excision, have 5-year survival rates of only 30% ―75% depending on disease stage [1]. Whether patients with stage IA or IB non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) should receive chemotherapy or if histology should play a role in therapeutic decision making remains controversial. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - December 17, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Horiana B. Grosu, Andrea Manzanera, Sudeep Shivakumar, Simon Sun, Nogueras Gonzalez Graciela, David E. Ost Source Type: research

Be-TeaM: an Italian real-world observational study on second-line therapy for EGFR-mutated NSCLC patients
In the past decades, the panorama of molecular diagnostics and care of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has rapidly evolved. The discovery of novel drivers for oncogene addiction has led to the development of additional therapeutic options in first as well as in subsequent lines. This, in turn, has fostered the search for robust and reliable molecular screening methods to support clinicians in prompt decision-making [1,2]. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - December 17, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Maria Lucia Reale, Rita Chiari, Marcello Tiseo, Fabiana Vitiello, Fausto Barbieri, Diego Cortinovis, Giovanni Luca Ceresoli, Giovanna Finocchiaro, Gianpiero Diego Romano, Pier Luigi Piovano, Alessandro Del Conte, Gloria Borra, Francesco Verderame, Vieri S Source Type: research

Next-generation sequencing informs diagnosis and identifies unexpected therapeutic targets in lung squamous cell carcinomas
Squamous cell carcinoma is a histologically defined subtype of lung cancer that exhibits a complex genetic landscape.[1,2] The genomics of squamous cell lung cancer are notable for the absence of certain targetable genomic alterations found commonly in lung adenocarcinoma (e.g. EGFR, ALK, etc.).[1 –3] Instead, an array of other genomic alterations have been identified including numerous gene amplifications (CCND1-3, CDK4, FGFR1-3, MET, PDGFRA, PIK3CA, SOX2), gene fusions (FGFR3-TACC3), tumor suppressor mutations (PTEN, TP53) and point mutations (EPHA2, AKT1, DDR2), often in combination.[1– 8] However, effective...
Source: Lung Cancer - December 11, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Jacob M. Sands, Tom Nguyen, Priyanka Shivdasani, Adrian G. Sacher, Michael L. Cheng, Ryan S. Alden, Pasi A. J änne, Frank C. Kuo, Geoffrey R. Oxnard, Lynette M. Sholl Source Type: research

Severe myocarditis with slight lymphocytic infiltration after nivolumab treatment
Among the various reported adverse events associated with immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), myocarditis is of particular concern in clinical practice as a relatively rare event but with an often fatal outcome [1]. However, the diagnosis of ICI-mediated myocarditis is challenging owing to its heterogeneous clinical presentation. Here, we report a case of histologically confirmed acute myocarditis showing only slight myocardial inflammation but severe left ventricular dysfunction after nivolumab treatment. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - December 9, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Ryuya Edahiro, Takayuki Shiroyama, Sachiko Hijiki, Satoshi Nojima, Yuya Shirai, Shohei Koyama, Atsushi Kumanogoh Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Concomitant genomic alterations in kras mutant advanced lung adenocarcinoma
KRAS mutations are the most commonly described alterations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) Caucasian population accounting for approximately 25% of cases being more frequent in patients with adenocarcinoma histology and smoking history [1]. Although prevalent, unfortunately, no specific treatment has been successfully developed for these patients [2]. With the advent of next generation sequencing (NGS) we have become aware that KRAS-mutated tumors can be associated with co-occurring alterations in multiple genes and with a higher mutational burden [3,4]. (Source: Lung Cancer)
Source: Lung Cancer - December 5, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Joan Gibert, Sergi Clav é, Max Hardy-Werbin, Álvaro Taus, Pedro Rocha, Raquel Longarón, Gabriel Piquer, Imane Chaib, Enric Carcereny, Teresa Morán, Marta Salido, Alba Dalmases, Beatriz Bellosillo, Edurne Arriola Source Type: research