Colorectal Cancer Screening in African American HOPE VI Public Housing Residents
This study explores whether colorectal cancer screening outreach via home visits and follow-up calls is effective among public housing African American residents. It reports on the proportion of returned Fecal Immunochemical Test kits, on the characteristics of study participants, and on their primary reasons for returning the kit. By conducting home visits and follow-up calls, our colorectal cancer–screening outreach resulted in a higher Fecal Immunochemical Test kit return rate than anticipated. Findings suggest that a more personalized outreach approach can yield higher colorectal cancer–screening rates amon...
Source: Family and Community Health - May 21, 2019 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Disentangling Race and Place in Depressive Symptoms in Men
African American men report lower levels of depressive symptoms that their white peers in national data. However, the value of these studies is often undermined by data that confound race, socioeconomic status, and segregation. We sought to determine whether race differences in depressive symptoms were present after minimizing the effects of socioeconomic status and segregation within a cohort of southwest Baltimore (SWB) men using the data from the Exploring Health Disparities in Integrated Communities (EHDIC), a novel study of racial disparities within communities where African American and non-Hispanic white males live ...
Source: Family and Community Health - May 21, 2019 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Chronic Stress and Food Insecurity: Examining Key Environmental Family Factors Related to Body Mass Index Among Low-Income Mexican-Origin Youth
Low-income children of Mexican immigrants are at high risk for obesity. Drawing on a sample of 104 Mexican American children (Mage = 8.39 years; 61% female), this longitudinal study considered relations between food insecurity and chronic stress (ie, parent report and hair cortisol measurement) on body mass index (BMI) and examined whether stress moderated associations between food insecurity and BMI. Analyses revealed that undocumented status was associated with food insecurity and chronic stress but not when accounting for poverty. Food insecurity was only associated with higher BMI for children with the highest hair cor...
Source: Family and Community Health - May 21, 2019 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Multilevel Interaction Effects of Family and Community Factors on Mothers' Engagement in Evidence-Based Home Visiting
Informed by ecological and family system frameworks, our study investigated the relationship between family- and community-level factors, and their cross-level interactions, with evidence-based home visiting program participation in a sample of 2409 mothers (mean age: 24.15 years). Using 2-level hierarchical linear modeling, we observed that mothers living in disadvantaged communities demonstrated less active engagement in evidence-based home visiting. Cross-level interaction effects revealed that mothers' unstable living conditions and psychiatric problems amplified the negative influence of disadvantaged communities on p...
Source: Family and Community Health - May 21, 2019 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Delivering Tobacco Cessation Through Community Health Workers: Curriculum and Training Considerations
Texas faces unique barriers in health status and risk behaviors such as smoking. To address tobacco use, community health workers (CHWs) are a resource for disseminating education among a population. To promote smoking cessation in Texas, there is a need for the development of a smoking cessation training program for CHWs. The National Community Health Worker Training Center used an approach with CHWs to develop a curriculum. From the curriculum development and with feedback from CHWs, 4 training courses were produced: online and in person, and in English and Spanish. The curriculum meets a need that disseminates smoking c...
Source: Family and Community Health - May 21, 2019 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Correlates Associated With Willingness to Start Pre-exposure Prophylaxis Among Young Black Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM) in Jackson, Mississippi
Black men who have sex with men have the greatest risk for human immunodeficiency virus infection. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a highly effective prevention method. However, uptake in this group is extremely low. Data from a sample of 225 human immunodeficiency virus–negative young black men who have sex with men residing in Jackson, Mississippi, were analyzed to examine correlates associated with willingness to start PrEP. Consistent condom users for both insertive and receptive sex were more likely to be willing to start PrEP than inconsistent condom users. Heterogeneity among this high-risk population is an...
Source: Family and Community Health - May 21, 2019 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

The Association Between Acculturation and Parental Feeding Practices in Families With Overweight and Obese Hispanic/Latino Children
This study examines the association between acculturation and parental feeding practices in low-income Latinos. Overweight/obese children (N = 117), aged 5 to 14 years, and their parents were recruited from a rural health clinic. Findings show that more acculturated parents have greater control over their child's eating behavior (P = .04). Parents who perceive their child as having a weight problem also have more control over their child's eating behavior (P = .02). Control measured from regulation of how much and when the child should eat to offering sweets and screen time for good behavior. Results underscore the need fo...
Source: Family and Community Health - May 21, 2019 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Suicide Attempt Resiliency in American Indian, Hispanic, and Anglo Youth in New Mexico: The Influence of Positive Adult Relationships
The purpose of this study was to identify whether positive relationships with adults at home, school, and in the community are protective for suicide among American Indian/Alaska Native, Hispanic, and Anglo adolescents. Using data from the New Mexico version of the 2015 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Youth Risk Behavior Survey, we found that positive relationships with adults affected past-year suicide attempts differently in youth from the 3 groups. The final multivariable model for American Indian/Alaska Native youth included only positive relationships with adults in the home. Among Hispanic and Anglo youth,...
Source: Family and Community Health - May 21, 2019 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Toward a Model of HPV Vaccine Series Completion in Adolescent Hispanic Males: Identifying Mothers' Salient Behavioral, Normative, and Control Beliefs
Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine series completion among adolescent Hispanic males (35%) is lower than the Healthy People 2020 80% goal. This directed qualitative content analysis identified mothers' beliefs about their sons completing the series. We found that mothers (N = 19) (1) express positive feelings; (2) believe the vaccine has positive effects; (3) identify the father and doctors as supporters and friends as nonsupporters; (4) list health insurance, transportation, and clinic reminders as facilitators; and (5) mention affordability as a barrier to vaccine completion. Results provide guidance for interventions. I...
Source: Family and Community Health - February 16, 2019 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Latino Health Perceptions in Rural Montana: Engaging Promotores de Salud Using Photovoice Through Facebook
The primary purposes of this study were to use photovoice with Facebook to explore health perceptions and health needs among promotores living in rural Montana and to build community among geographically dispersed promotores. Seven promotores participated in a photovoice project where they uploaded photographs and shared comments in a private Facebook group. Emergent themes based on the promotores' health perceptions, discussions, and interviews were transcribed and coded. Findings of this study will be used to assess health perceptions and needs of the promotores and Latino community in rural Montana. (Source: Family and Community Health)
Source: Family and Community Health - February 16, 2019 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Relationship Between Body Mass Index and Body Image Disturbances Among South African Mothers and Their Daughters Living in Soweto, Johannesburg
In South African families, a phenomenon of mothers' acceptance of stoutness coexists with their daughters' appreciation for thinness. A sample of N = 615 mother-and-daughter pairs was recruited to conjointly identify the relationships toward body image and body mass index between both groups by assessing body weight satisfaction, body esteem, and eating disorders risk. We observed higher prevalence of obesity in mothers and higher eating disorders risk in daughters, while mother-daughter relationships were identified for body mass index and psychometric dimensions. The high prevalence of obesity in mothers and their tolera...
Source: Family and Community Health - February 16, 2019 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Associations Among Caregiver Feeding Practices and Blood Pressure in African American Adolescents: The Jackson Heart KIDS Study
Caregiver feeding practices have been linked to youth health outcomes. The present study examined associations among caregiver feeding practices and blood pressure in 212 African American adolescents via the Child Feeding Practices Questionnaire. Results revealed a positive association between caregivers' concern about their child's weight and diastolic blood pressure, which was more acute for older adolescent boys. Caregivers' perceived responsibility for the quality and quantity of food their child receives was also associated with lower diastolic blood pressure in older adolescent boys. Feeding practices are ideal targe...
Source: Family and Community Health - February 16, 2019 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Affective and Cognitive Attitudes on Cervical Health Behaviors Among Asian American Women
This study explored factors influencing cervical health behaviors of these populations, using a 2-dimensional model (ie, affect and cognition) of attitude structure approach. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 33 participants. A semantic content analysis was used to identify major codes and themes across the transcripts. Multiple aspects of both negative and positive affect and cognition, which led to 3 different cervical health behaviors (avoidance, ambivalence, and acceptance), emerged from the interviews. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed. (Source: Family and Community Health)
Source: Family and Community Health - February 16, 2019 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Food Security Status and Overweight/Obesity Among 2- to 5-Year-Old Boys and Girls in a Community-Based Clinic
The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between food security, parental health behaviors, and overweight/obesity among 2- to 5-year-old children in West Tennessee (N = 264). Results from logistic regression models indicate that the association between parental characteristics and child weight status varies by child sex and household food security. These findings highlight the need for more nuanced analysis that can produce results that inform and shape the development of precise health promotion and intervention strategies designed for diverse low-resource populations. (Source: Family and Community Health)
Source: Family and Community Health - February 16, 2019 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Associations of Health Self-efficacy With Engagement in Health-Promoting Behaviors and Treatment Adherence in Rural Patients
Rural residents have lower levels of engagement in health-promoting behaviors and treatment adherence than their urban counterparts. This cross-sectional study sought to understand the role of health self-efficacy as a precursor to engagement in health-promoting behaviors and treatment adherence in 273 rural patients. Structural equation model was used to examine whether health self-efficacy predicted engagement in health-promoting behaviors and treatment adherence. Results show that health self-efficacy predicts engagement in health-promoting behaviors and treatment adherence. Boosting patients' health self-efficacy could...
Source: Family and Community Health - February 16, 2019 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Promoting Health Equity Through Trauma-Informed Care: Critical Role for Physicians in Policy and Program Development
Trauma-informed care has emerged as an important model to address the pervasiveness of traumatic experiences across the life cycle and their association with significant adverse medical and psychiatric consequences. To achieve health equity, in which all people have the opportunity for health, it is crucial for physicians to become comfortable with a neurobiopsychosocial understanding of trauma and how to provide optimal trauma-informed care. Given the pervasiveness of trauma exposure, and its impact on individual and community health, this paradigm shift in adult health care delivery systems requires physician engagement ...
Source: Family and Community Health - February 16, 2019 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Sex Differences, Duration of Stay in the United States, and Serious Psychological Distress: The Case of Middle Eastern Immigrants in the United States
Using data from the 2002-2012 National Health Interview Surveys, this study examines the association between duration of stay in the United States and serious psychological distress (SPD) among Middle Eastern (ME) immigrants and tests whether this association differs by sex. Results show that although ME immigrant women with longer duration are significantly more likely to report SPD than US-born white women, the SPD of ME immigrant men do not significantly differ from that of US-born white men. These findings emphasize the harmful influence of a longer duration of stay in the United States on the SPD of ME immigrant women...
Source: Family and Community Health - February 16, 2019 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Problematic Eating Behaviors Are More Prevalent in African American Women Who Are Overweight or Obese Than African American Women Who Are Lean or Normal Weight
Problematic eating behaviors such as overeating and loss of control over consumption can lead to obesity. Problematic eating behaviors among women of differing body mass indexes were explored through focus group methodology, the Palatable Eating Motives Scale (PEMS), and a taste test in a sample of low-income African American women (n = 45). Women who were overweight or obese (W-O/O) reported more problematic eating behaviors including eating in the absence of hunger, frequent overeating, and increased food thoughts than women who were lean or normal weight (W-L/N). The W-O/O appear to possess more problematic eating behav...
Source: Family and Community Health - February 16, 2019 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Building and Sustaining Community Capacity to Address Childhood Obesity: A 3-Year Mixed-Methods Case Study of a Community-Academic Advisory Board
Guided by a community-based participatory research and systems-based approach, this 3-year mixed-methods case study describes the experiences and capacity development of a Community-Academic Advisory Board (CAB) formed to adapt, implement, and evaluate an evidence-based childhood obesity treatment program in a medically underserved region. The CAB included community, public health, and clinical (n = 9) and academic partners (n = 9). CAB members completed capacity evaluations at 4 points. Partners identified best practices that attributed to the successful execution and continued advancement of project goals. The methodolog...
Source: Family and Community Health - November 17, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Health Equity Source Type: research

Maternal Social and Economic Factors and Infant Morbidity, Mortality, and Congenital Anomaly: Are There Associations?
This study found that newborn and postneonatal hospital readmissions are inversely associated with geography. Additionally, social context, including maternal history of child abuse, is associated with infant postneonatal hospital readmissions. Geography and education are associated with infant mortality. Income was not associated with infant mortality or morbidity following adjustment for social support. Interestingly, congenital anomaly rates are 1.2 times more common among 2 parent families and male infants. Understanding associations between infant health and maternal social and economic factors may contribute to inter...
Source: Family and Community Health - November 17, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Health Equity Source Type: research

Social Network Gap Analysis Evaluation: A Case Study of the Southeastern Health Equity Council
This study employed social network gap analysis as an evaluation tool. Survey data collected from the Southeastern Health Equity Council members were used to assess connections among members as a whole, by committee, by state, and by health specialty area. Analysis of how well Southeastern Health Equity Council met the representation outlined in its strategic plan was also conducted. Recommendations for improving the network and opportunities to effectively recruit and advance the work of Southeastern Health Equity Council are discussed. (Source: Family and Community Health)
Source: Family and Community Health - November 17, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Health Equity Source Type: research

Testing the Efficacy of a Web-Based Parent-Adolescent Sexual Communication Intervention Among Puerto Ricans
This randomized controlled trial tested the efficacy of a Web-based intervention to increase sexual communication between parents and adolescents. Parent/adolescent dyads (n = 660) were recruited from communities in the San Juan area and randomly assigned to the Cuídalos sexual communication or physical activity program. Parent assessments were obtained preintervention and at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up. Parents in the experimental group reported significantly more sexual communication (ie, peer pressure, sexual prevention, protection, risk) over time than parents in the control group. Results support the efficac...
Source: Family and Community Health - November 17, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Health Equity Source Type: research

Identifying Food Insecurity in Health Care Settings: A Systematic Scoping Review of the Evidence
This systematic scoping review explores evidence on food insecurity (FI) screening measures, acceptability, and program implementation in health care settings. Validation studies on brief screening tools suggest that instruments exist that adequately measure the construct of FI. Patients and clinicians found FI screening acceptable in a range of clinical settings, though studies are not high quality and rarely reflect substantial patient diversity. Targeted interventions successfully increased screening rates and reduced screening barriers. More research is needed to understand implementation and effectiveness of FI screen...
Source: Family and Community Health - November 17, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Health Equity Source Type: research

The Role of Collective Efficacy in Reducing Health Disparities: A Systematic Review
Many improvements in health equity are spearheaded by community collaborations working to change policy and social norms. But how can collective efficacy (CE), defined as the willingness and ability of a group to work toward a common good, be increased? Eight articles reporting on interventions aiming to reduce health disparities by improving CE were found for this systematic literature review. All studies showed improvements in CE and most found reduction in disparities, but operationalization of CE varied. Findings support a model of how CE can address health disparities, which can guide standardization of CE interventio...
Source: Family and Community Health - November 17, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Health Equity Source Type: research

The Impact of Individual and Parental American Indian Boarding School Attendance on Chronic Physical Health of Northern Plains Tribes
This study investigated the relationship of American Indian boarding school attendance and chronic physical health. We hypothesized boarding school attendance would be associated with an increased number of chronic physical health problems. We also examined the relationship between boarding school attendance and the 15 chronic health problems that formed the count of the chronic health conditions. American Indian attendees had a greater count of chronic physical health problems compared with nonattendees. Father's attendance was independently associated with chronic physical health problems. Attendees were more likely to h...
Source: Family and Community Health - November 17, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Health Equity Source Type: research

ACOs' Impact on Hospitalization Rates of Rural Older Adults With Diabetes: Early Indications
This study provides baseline measures for patient outcomes during the initial years of ACO formation. (Source: Family and Community Health)
Source: Family and Community Health - August 24, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Achieving IHI's Triple Aim by Utilizing Core Health Program With Community Health Workers in Rural Communities
Utilizing a nurse/community health worker team model, a Midwest institution's community health care division developed a 12-month managed care program for underserved individuals diagnosed with heart failure and/or diabetes. A study of 277 patients was conducted to determine whether this model could be utilized in rural settings. The program was evaluated using the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's Triple Aim criteria; HEDIS measures and other health indicators quantified each patient's performance. Study participants showed improved outcomes and a reduction in the total cost of care. Hospital admissions decreased (20...
Source: Family and Community Health - August 24, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Social Determinants of Health and the Effects on Quality of Life and Well-being in 2 Rural Appalachia Communities: The Community Members' Perspective and Implications for Health Disparities
Recent evidence highlights health disparities among rural communities. The purpose of this study was to learn from members of 2 Appalachia communities in North Carolina about barriers to health and well-being. Researchers conducted 3 focus groups (n = 24), which were coded and analyzed by a team of researchers to identify themes. Researchers identified 5 themes: (1) poverty/lack of economic opportunity; (2) access to health care and health resources; (3) social/mental health challenges; (4) food insecurity/hunger; and (5) youth/older adults being most vulnerable to health disparities. Ample evidence suggests that rural App...
Source: Family and Community Health - August 24, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Do Infant Feeding Practices Differ Between Grandmothers and Mothers in Rural China? Evidence From Rural Shaanxi Province
The overall goal of this study is to examine whether infant feeding practices differ between mothers and grandmothers in rural China. We randomly sampled 1383 caregivers of infants aged 18 to 30 months living in 351 villages across 174 townships in nationally designated poverty counties in rural areas. Results show that a high fraction of caregivers of 18- to 30-month-old children living in low-income areas of rural China do not regularly engage in positive infant feeding practices. Only 30% of children in our sample achieved adequate dietary diversity. Only 49% of children in our sample were fed meat in the day prior to s...
Source: Family and Community Health - August 24, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

The Relationship Between Country of Origin and Prenatal Care Among Unauthorized Mexican and Guatemalan Immigrants
This study examined how country of origin (Mexico or Guatemala) correlates with prenatal care utilization among unauthorized Latina immigrants, who encounter disparate access to health care. Logistic regression and negative binomial regression analyses were used to examine prenatal care adequacy and number of visits among a sample of 4188 unauthorized Latina immigrants. Findings suggest that originating from Guatemala predicted increased likelihood of inadequate prenatal care and fewer prenatal care visits. Implications can inform policy and practice to strengthen prenatal care utilization, especially for unauthorized Guat...
Source: Family and Community Health - August 24, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Neighborhood Social and Environmental Factors and Asthma Among Children Living in Low-Income Neighborhoods: The Importance of Informal Social Control
We examined the relationship between child asthma and features associated with neighborhood poverty including safety, social cohesion, informal social control, collective efficacy, and disorder, across a sample of children from low-income neighborhoods (N = 3010; 2005-2007). Results show that the relationship between asthma and poverty is accounted for by family-level characteristics, but informal social control remains significantly and positively related to asthma after accounting for family-level characteristics. We discuss the importance of neighborhood environmental features for children's asthma. (Source: Family and Community Health)
Source: Family and Community Health - August 24, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

E-Cigarettes in Baltimore Alcohol Outlets: Geographic and Demographic Correlates of Availability
There is limited research on e-cigarette availability despite increased use. E-cigarette availability within Baltimore alcohol outlets was analyzed for disparities among residential neighborhoods. Data were obtained via field surveys of alcohol outlets, and then spatially merged with sociodemographic data; 18.8% of alcohol outlets had any e-cigarette availability. Regression models showed greater odds ratios for e-cigarette availability when cigarettes, cigars, or hookah paraphernalia were sold, and lower odds ratios when alcohol outlets had an on-site consumption license. Outlets with e-cigarette availability were in pred...
Source: Family and Community Health - August 24, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

An Exploration of Multilevel Physical Activity Correlates Among Low-Income African Americans in Alabama and Mississippi
This study sought to examine the relationship between meeting the minimum recommendation for moderate physical activity and multilevel, including policy, systems, and environmental, strategies thought to influence health behaviors. We utilize preintervention community survey data from a sample of 256 low-income, predominantly, African Americans in 3 southeastern cities. Results indicate that individual, social, and environmental factors are related to whether participants met the recommended guidelines for physical activity and that sex predicts whether guidelines are met. (Source: Family and Community Health)
Source: Family and Community Health - August 24, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Foreword
No abstract available (Source: Family and Community Health)
Source: Family and Community Health - August 24, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Foreword Source Type: research

Outcomes of Community-Based Prenatal Education Programs for Pregnant Women in Rural Texas
A prenatal, evidenced-based education program was implemented in 7 rural counties and provided by trained staff at the Texas Department of State Health Services. This was implemented to address health disparities, in regard to birth outcomes, in rural minorities of Southeast Texas. The participants were given a preassessment (N = 382) and a postassessment (N = 326) of relevant health knowledge and a follow-up assessment (N = 149) to document the outcomes of their birth as well as health practices they were employing as new parents. The assessment results were analyzed to determine the effectiveness of the programs on impro...
Source: Family and Community Health - May 18, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Estimated Cost Savings: Everyone With Diabetes Counts (EDC) Program
Everyone with Diabetes Counts (EDC) is a national disparities reduction program funded by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to improve outcomes in the underserved minority, diverse, and rural populations. This analysis evaluates West Virginia's pilot program of diabetes self-management education (DSME), one component of EDC. We frequency-matched 422 DSME completers to 1688 others by demographics and enrollment from Medicare fee-for service claims. We estimated savings associated with reduced hospitalizations in multivariable negative binomial models. DSME completers had 29% fewer hospitalizations (adjusted P...
Source: Family and Community Health - May 18, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Development of a Community Health Worker–Delivered Cognitive Behavioral Training Intervention for Individuals With Diabetes and Chronic Pain
We present an iterative developmental approach that combined program adaptation, pretesting, and CHW training processes for a CBT-based diabetes self-care program for individuals living with diabetes and chronic pain. Collaborative intervention refinement, combined with CHW training, is a promising methodology for community-engaged research in remote, underresourced communities. (Source: Family and Community Health)
Source: Family and Community Health - May 18, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Health Self-Empowerment Theory: Predicting Health Behaviors and BMI in Culturally Diverse Adults
This study tests the theoretical integrity of Health Self-Empowerment Theory and its usefulness in predicting health-promoting behaviors and body mass index. Results from surveying 189 predominantly low-income, overweight/obese, and culturally diverse adults showed that most Health Self-Empowerment Theory variables were positively correlated. Structural equation modeling showed that 4 variables significantly predicted engagement in health-promoting behaviors, which mediated the relationships between body mass index and (a) motivation, (b) health self-efficacy, and (c) self-praise. Results support creating psychologically i...
Source: Family and Community Health - May 18, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Health Outcomes of Medically and Economically Vulnerable Adults: A Comparison of Former Foster Youth and Nonfoster Youth
Medically and economically vulnerable adults experience various challenges that can impact their health. Within this vulnerable population, there may be individuals who are even more vulnerable, those who have a history of involvement with the foster care system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the difference of reported health-related problems between adults with previous foster care experience and other vulnerable adults. Physical, mental, and relational health was evaluated in this study. Practice and policy implications for mental health and medical professionals are discussed. (Source: Family and Community Health)
Source: Family and Community Health - May 18, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

The Role of Family of Origin in Current Lifestyle Choices: A Qualitative Secondary Data Analysis of Interracial and Same-Race Couples
Many Americans are in poor health. This is acute for racial/ethnic minorities compared with the Non-Hispanic white population. A grounded theory approach was used to analyze semistructured qualitative interviews to identify perceptions of family-of-origin lifestyle choices in same-race and interracial couples. Several central themes emerged from the data including influence of family-of-origin eating patterns, lack of family-of-origin importance for physical activity, and romantic partner influence in eating and exercise. Findings provide evidence for the socialization of family of origin on lifestyle choices into adulthoo...
Source: Family and Community Health - May 18, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Childhood Asthma Disparities in Chicago: Developing Approaches to Health Inequities
We conducted a needs assessment to develop an evidence-based, locally tailored asthma care implementation plan for high-risk children with asthma in Chicago. Our team of health policy experts, clinicians, researchers, and designers included extensive stakeholder engagement (N = 162) in a mixed-methods community needs assessment. Results showed the lines of communication and collaboration across sectors were weak; caregivers were the only consistent force and could not always manage this burden. A series of recommendations for interventions and how to implement and measure them were generated. Cooperative, multidisciplinary...
Source: Family and Community Health - May 18, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Health and Health Care From the Perspective of Intimate Partner Violence Adult Female Victims in Shelters: Impact of IPV, Unmet Needs, Barriers, Experiences, and Preferences
This study reports the perspectives of adult female IPV victims about the impact of IPV on their health and barriers of health care access for themselves and their children. The majority rated their health as good to excellent (69%). However, 83.5% indicated that IPV negatively affected their health; 53.5% had unmet health care needs. Mental health care was the most common unmet need for women; children's unmet needs were immunizations and preventive care. Transportation difficulties posed the biggest barrier to health care access. (Source: Family and Community Health)
Source: Family and Community Health - February 23, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Parenting Stress in Fathers of Children With Type 1 Diabetes
The purpose of the present study was to evaluate generic and pediatric parenting stress in an international sample of fathers of children with type 1 diabetes. Two-hundred forty-nine fathers of children ages 2 to 10 years with type 1 diabetes completed the Parenting Stress Index, Pediatric Inventory for Parents, Dads' Active Disease Support Scale (DADS), Self-Care Inventory, and a demographic/disease-related questionnaire online. More frequency of pediatric parenting stress was associated with greater general parenting stress (r = −0.25, P (Source: Family and Community Health)
Source: Family and Community Health - February 23, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

The Relationship Between Expressed Emotion and the Probability of Suicide Among Turkish Psychiatric Outpatients: A Descriptive Cross-sectional Survey
The purpose of this study is to examine expressed emotion and the relationship between expressed emotion and suicide probability in psychiatric outpatients (N = 350). Patients who did not receive support from anyone scored higher on the Level of Expressed Emotion (LEE) Scale than those who were supported by family, friends, or their physician provider. Scores by patients, who selected their spouse as a key person, scored higher on the LEE than those who chose one of their children. Spouses on the LEE were often depicted as being more intrusive, reactive, and intolerant when compared with their children. The probability of ...
Source: Family and Community Health - February 23, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Obstetric Access and the Community Health Imperative for Rural Women
This study examined whether the closure of several inpatient obstetric units in rural New Hampshire affected birth outcomes. It is a secondary analysis of birth certificate data from 2005 through 2012 and includes 5881 births. There were no changes in perinatal outcomes. When examining outcomes based on distance travelled to place of birth, controlling for closures, women who traveled greater than 30 miles had fewer prenatal visits and lower birth weight and gestational age infants. Community services that provide prenatal care and/or home visiting are even more important when obstetric units are not available in the commu...
Source: Family and Community Health - February 23, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

The Effects of a Health Promotion Program on Rural, West Virginia Adults
This health promotion project is a 12-week program for adults in a rural West Virginia community with a body mass index (BMI) of 25 or greater. The goals of this project were to facilitate learning through modules focusing on activity and nutrition, increase knowledge of healthy activity and nutrition, and improve weight and BMI. Each 12-week session provided evidenced-based information regarding obesity, physical activity, and nutrition. Participants completed pre- and postprogram and 1-month follow-up survey/questionnaire. Results were compared for changes in activity, nutrition, and BMI. The program resulted in positive...
Source: Family and Community Health - February 23, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

There and Back Again: How the Repeal of ACA Can Impact Community Health Centers and the Populations They Serve
We examined the impact of Medicaid expansion on rates of the remaining uninsured at the federally qualified health center level by race/ethnicity, limited English proficiency, and poverty status of their patients. Results indicated a systematic disadvantage in nonexpansion states for federally qualified health centers with high concentrations of these populations and an advantage in expansion states for federally qualified health centers with fewer limited English proficiency patients. Our findings highlight the importance of maintaining the Affordable Care Act in reducing disparities in coverage and the importance of fede...
Source: Family and Community Health - February 23, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Health, Well-being, and Health Care Access in Rural Communities: Comparing Latino and Non-Latino White Low-income Families
This study explores how low-income rural Latino children and their mothers differ from their non-Latino white counterparts in terms of health, well-being, and health care access. A subsample of non-Latino white (n = 201) and Latino (n = 157) children and their mothers was drawn from the Rural Families Speak about Health Project, a multistate, cross-sectional data set developed through mixed purposive sampling methods. Findings suggest that Latino children's families were disadvantaged in terms of child health and access to health care, whereas non-Latino white children's families were disadvantaged in terms of child behavi...
Source: Family and Community Health - February 23, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Voices of the Filipino Community Describing the Importance of Family in Understanding Adolescent Behavioral Health Needs
This article describes a qualitative study that investigates the role of family when understanding behavioral health needs among Filipino adolescents. Findings highlight the importance of addressing family cohesion when designing interventions aimed at improving the well-being of Filipino youth. (Source: Family and Community Health)
Source: Family and Community Health - January 1, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Families and the Juvenile Justice System: Considerations for Family-Based Interventions
We conducted focus groups with defense lawyers, clinicians, and education advocates to gather their perspectives on families' experiences with the juvenile justice system. Our quantitative descriptive analysis identified a range of themes such as discussions about the poor treatment of families as well as recommendations for a shifting of power to families. These perspectives may provide insights about the context in which families are expected to participate in interventions, meet probationary demands, and provide for their youth's well-being. The results support evidence gathered from families about the impact of youth i...
Source: Family and Community Health - January 1, 2018 Category: Primary Care Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research