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HPV Vaccine Could Mean 3 Pap Tests in a Lifetime HPV Vaccine Could Mean 3 Pap Tests in a Lifetime
Women who have had the human papillomavirus (HPV) jab may only need 3 smear tests for cervical cancer in their lifetime, a study suggests.WebMD Health News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care News Source Type: news

HPV blood test: Throat CANCER chemotherapy treatment can cause THESE toxic side-effects
A TEST for throat cancer patients with the human papillomavirus could find whether chemotherapy treatment will be effective. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

HPV blood test: Throat cancer treatment can cause THESE toxic side-effects
A TEST for throat cancer patients with the human papillomavirus could find whether chemotherapy treatment will be effective. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Screening for cervical abnormalities in women offered HPV vaccination
(PLOS) Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing detects a higher number of precancerous cervical lesions than cytology-based Pap smears in a female population including a proportion offered HPV vaccination, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine by Karen Canfell of Cancer Council New South Wales, Australia, researchers at the Victorian Cytology Service, Melbourne, Australia, and colleagues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 19, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Improving cervical cancer screening rates for transgender men
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study indicates that alternative options for cervical cancer screening, including self-sampling for human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, could improve the screening rate among transgender men. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

3 Scientists and Planned Parenthood Win Lasker Prizes for Medical Research
(NEW YORK) — Two scientists who paved the way for widely used vaccines and another who discovered key players in cell growth have been awarded prestigious medical research awards. The Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation also announced Wednesday that it was giving its public service award to Planned Parenthood. Each award includes a $250,000 honorarium. The foundation’s clinical research award is shared by Dr. Douglas Lowy and John Schiller of the U.S. National Cancer Institute. In the early 1990s they began work that would eventually lead to vaccines against human papillomavirus, or HPV, which causes cervical can...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Malcolm Ritter / AP Tags: Uncategorized awards medical research onetime Planned Parenthood Science Source Type: news

How Common Are STIs?
Discussion Of the 30 different microbes which can be transmitted by sexual contact, 8 have the greatest incidence of transmitting disease. Four are curable (Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, Syphilis and Trichomoniasis) and 4 are incurable at present (Hepatitis B, Herpes simplex virus (HSV), Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Human papillomavirus (HPV)). Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are important as they can cause: Increased rates of acquisition of other STIs (ie HSV and syphilis increase the rate of HIV infection acquisition) Pelvic inflammatory disease and infertility Stillbirth and neonatal death Neonatal morbidity i...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - July 17, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

HPV Testing Speeds Cancer Diagnosis When Cytology Is Confusing HPV Testing Speeds Cancer Diagnosis When Cytology Is Confusing
Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing in women with cytology showing atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) in the cervix leads to faster and more complete diagnosis, according to new research published in JAMA Oncology.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

HPV tests lead to earlier detection of cervical pre-cancer
Women who receive human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, in addition to a pap smear, receive a faster, more complete diagnosis of possible cervical pre-cancer, according to UK researchers. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - June 23, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

HPV testing leads to earlier detection and treatment of cervical pre-cancer
(Queen Mary University of London) Women who receive human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, in addition to a pap smear, receive a faster, more complete diagnosis of possible cervical precancer, according to a study of over 450,000 women by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and the University of New Mexico (UNM) Comprehensive Cancer Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 22, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Henrietta Lacks' Cells Are Still Helping Protect Women From Cervical Cancer
When Henrietta Lacks was being treated for cervical cancer more than 60 years ago, her cells were taken for medical research without her consent. This ethical controversy became the subject of a 2010 best-selling book, Rebecca Skloot’s The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks, and now an HBO movie of the same name starring Oprah Winfrey. Despite radiation therapy and surgery, Lacks died from the cancer in 1951. But her cells, known to scientists as HeLa cells, have played a role in many scientific advancements ― and have helped protect other young women from the cervical cancer that took Lacks’ lif...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Henrietta Lacks' Cells Are Still Helping Protect Women From Cervical Cancer
When Henrietta Lacks was being treated for cervical cancer more than 60 years ago, her cells were taken for medical research without her consent. This ethical controversy became the subject of a 2010 best-selling book, Rebecca Skloot’s The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks, and now an HBO movie of the same name starring Oprah Winfrey. Despite radiation therapy and surgery, Lacks died from the cancer in 1951. But her cells, known to scientists as HeLa cells, have played a role in many scientific advancements ― and have helped protect other young women from the cervical cancer that took Lacks’ lif...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 21, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Who Was Henrietta Lacks? 5 Striking Facts About The ‘Mother Of Modern Medicine’
Hardly anyone knew of Henrietta Lacks’ life story prior to 2010.   That year, Rebecca Skloot’s The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks was released, and went on to become a New York Times best-seller. The biographical book told the story of a black woman born on a tobacco farm in Roanoke, Virginia, in 1920 who revolutionized medical research and saved the lives of millions, without ever knowing it. Now, a new film by the same name starring Oprah Winfrey aims to make her life and impact more widely known. Who exactly was Henrietta Lacks? And why is she described as the “Mother of Medicine&...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Who Was Henrietta Lacks? 5 Striking Facts About The ‘Mother Of Modern Medicine’
Hardly anyone knew of Henrietta Lacks’ life story prior to 2010.   That year, Rebecca Skloot’s The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks was released, and went on to become a New York Times best-seller. The biographical book told the story of a black woman born on a tobacco farm in Roanoke, Virginia, in 1920 who revolutionized medical research and saved the lives of millions, without ever knowing it. Now, a new film by the same name starring Oprah Winfrey aims to make her life and impact more widely known. Who exactly was Henrietta Lacks? And why is she described as the “Mother of Medicine&...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Henrietta Lacks's Cells Made These Breakthroughs Possible
Since its establishment in 1951, the HeLa cell line has been used to study everything from influenza to in vitro fertilization—and HeLa cells can now be found in laboratories the world over. Among the breakthrough medical moments Lacks’s DNA made possible: 1952 Jonas Salk develops the world’s first polio vaccine—but the lifesaving advancement must be tested before being given to children. Enter the first HeLa distribution center, created to produce trillions of cells and expose them to the virus. 1953 HeLa cells are mistakenly mixed with a liquid that causes their chromosomes to unclump, offering a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Henrietta Lacks's Cells Made These Breakthroughs Possible
Since its establishment in 1951, the HeLa cell line has been used to study everything from influenza to in vitro fertilization—and HeLa cells can now be found in laboratories the world over. Among the breakthrough medical moments Lacks’s DNA made possible: 1952 Jonas Salk develops the world’s first polio vaccine—but the lifesaving advancement must be tested before being given to children. Enter the first HeLa distribution center, created to produce trillions of cells and expose them to the virus. 1953 HeLa cells are mistakenly mixed with a liquid that causes their chromosomes to unclump, offering a...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 17, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Pittsburgh docs on pap smears: Still relevant, but maybe not for long
Pap smears, once recommended annually to screen women for cervical cancer, have decreased in frequency in the past few years as screening and vaccinations for human papillomavirus, the virus that causes the vast majority of cervical cancer cases, have become more widespread — a trend Pittsburgh doctors say could lead medicine away from the pap smear altogether. While countries like the Netherlands and Australia have abandoned the pap smear in favor of HPV-only testing, most U.S. doctors still… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - March 6, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Lydia Nuzum Source Type: news

We've Been Seriously Underestimating Cervical Cancer Risks
Women, especially black women, might face a greater chance of dying of cervical cancer than previously thought, according to a study published Monday in the journal Cancer. Estimates from previous studies may have been artificially low because they included women who had had hysterectomies, a procedure to remove the uterus. The new study suggests that black women are dying at a rate 77 percent higher, and white women are dying at a rate 47 percent higher, than researchers had previously thought. After adjusting for hysterectomies, cervical cancer killed 10 out of every 100,000 black women and approximately 5 out ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

These Numbers Show Just How Safe Vaccines Are
Anti-vaccine advocate Robert F. Kennedy Jr. said that President-elect Donald Trump asked him to lead a new government commission on vaccine safety. But science on this issue is already clear; numerous studies show that vaccines are safe and effective, and that serious side effects are rare. On Jan. 10, Kennedy met with the president-elect at Trump Tower, and later told reporters about the new commission. However, the Trump administration did not confirm that such a commission was in the works. A spokesperson for Trump said only that the president-elect was “exploring the possibility of forming a committee on autism,&...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

These Numbers Show Just How Safe Vaccines Are
Anti-vaccine advocate Robert F. Kennedy Jr. said that President-elect Donald Trump asked him to lead a new government commission on vaccine safety. But science on this issue is already clear; numerous studies show that vaccines are safe and effective, and that serious side effects are rare. On Jan. 10, Kennedy met with the president-elect at Trump Tower, and later told reporters about the new commission. However, the Trump administration did not confirm that such a commission was in the works. A spokesperson for Trump said only that the president-elect was “exploring the possibility of forming a committee on autism,&...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 17, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

HPV Blood Test Could Predict Prognosis in Head and Neck Cancer
Head and neck cancer patients who have a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection detectable with a blood-based biomarker have a better prognosis compared with HPV-negative patients. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - December 22, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Anna Azvolinsky Tags: Head & Neck Cancer News Source Type: news

Cervical screening every 10 years for healthy women is 'safe'
Conclusion This long-term follow-up of women involved in the POBASCAM randomised controlled trial aimed to assess the risk of extending screening intervals to more than five years for HPV-based cervical screening programmes. The study found that in women who were HPV negative, the long-term incidence of cervical cancer and abnormal cells was low. The research team believes these findings mean the interval between cervical screening tests can be increased to more than five years for women over the age of 40. This study was well designed, and included a large number of women with similar dropout rates between study arms. ...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Medical practice Source Type: news

10-Year Interval for Cervical Cancer Screening Proposed 10-Year Interval for Cervical Cancer Screening Proposed
Women aged 40 years or older who test negative for human papillomavirus can safely be screened for cervical cancer every 10 years, say Dutch researchers.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - October 6, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Cervical cancer: gap between screenings ‘can be increased to 10 years’
Dutch researchers say tests suggest increase in screening intervals for HPV-negative women over 40 is justifiedThe length of time between cervical screenings can safely be extended to a decade for some women, research suggests.The findings from researchers in the Netherlands show that for women over the age of 40 who test negative for the human papillomavirus (HPV), the gap between screening rounds could be increased to 10 years.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 4, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Cervical cancer Health Society UK news World news Medical research Source Type: news

BD Submits Pre-Market Approval Application to FDA for BD Onclarity(TM) HPV Test
FRANKLIN LAKES, N.J., Sept. 6, 2016 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company) (BDX), a leading global medical technology company, announced today that it has submitted a pre-market approval (PMA) application to the U.... Diagnostics, FDA BD, BD Onclarity, HPV Assay, human papillomavirus, HPV (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - September 6, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Well: The Weekly Health Quiz: Happiness, Fracking and Fatal Music
Test your knowledge of this week ’ s health news. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: TOBY BILANOW Tags: Cervarix (Vaccine) Gardasil (Vaccine) Happiness Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Hydraulic Fracturing Infections medicine and health Musical Instruments Vegetables Featured Quizzes Source Type: news

Teen boys ’ HPV-vaccination rate hits almost 50 percent, CDC says
The rate of HPV vaccination among teen boys in the United States surged in 2015, suggesting that more parents and physicians are embracing the message that it's as important for boys to be vaccinated against the human papillomavirus as it is for girls. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday that 49.8 percent […]Related:EpiPens are my armor against disaster. They shouldn’t be priced like a luxury.How violence could be hurting kids with HIVGene test can reduce chemo use among breast-cancer patients, study says (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - August 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

1st HPV Test for Use With Preservative Fluid
Human papillomavirus responsible for 70 percent of cervical cancers (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - July 8, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: webmaster at doctorslounge.com Tags: Oncology, Pharmacy, FDA Approvals, Source Type: news

1st HPV Test for Use with Preservative Fluid
Human papillomavirus responsible for 70 percent of cervical cancers Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Cervical Cancer Screening, HPV, Laboratory Tests (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - July 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

1st HPV Test for Use With Preservative Fluid
Human papillomavirus responsible for 70 percent of cervical cancers (Source: Cancercompass News: Gynecological Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Gynecological Cancer - July 8, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

When It Comes To Cervical Cancer, Two Tests Are Better -- And Cheaper -- Than One
It is right that we constantly should be testing our assumptions about what keeps us healthy and what puts us at risk. New ideas and evidence that challenge current behaviors must be taken into consideration. But "new" isn't necessarily better, and many of our current practices - despite alternatives that by their very newness might seem better - remain the best option for care. This is especially relevant now as OB-GYNs from around the country recently convened at the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) annual meeting to debate the latest topics related to cervical cancer screening. Pow...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

VIDEO: Should the HPV test be a stand-alone cancer screening test?
WASHINGTON – Despite being approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a primary cervical cancer screening test starting at age 25, most medical societies recommend that the human papillomavirus... (Source: Family Practice News)
Source: Family Practice News - May 16, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Combining pap, hrHPV tests could drastically reduce cancer miss rates
Cytopathology researchers recently found that combining two diagnostic tests, Pap and high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV), dramatically decreased the chance of missing tumors and high-grade lesions by sevenfold. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 3, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Get Tested for Sexually-Transmitted Infections
When Charlie Sheen disclosed his HIV infection last fall, sexually transmitted infections were back in the public eye. His case will likely contribute to the belief many people have that HIV is caused by sexual promiscuity or injection drug use, when in reality having unprotected sex with someone HIV-positive just one time can lead to HIV infection. April is STD Awareness Month. The new term for STD is STI -- sexually transmitted infection -- to focus on the infection rather than the disease it could lead to. One way to mark the occasion is to get tested for HIV and thus help eradicate the stigma. A focus on HIV for STD A...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

ACS Releases Long-term Care Guideline for Survivors of Head and Neck Cancer
By Stacy Simon The American Cancer Society has released a new Head and Neck Survivorship Care Guideline to help survivors of head and neck cancer and their primary care providers better manage their long-term care. The guideline addresses cancers of the oral cavity, tongue, lip, pharynx (throat), and larynx (voice box). Recommendations in the guideline may also apply to cancers of the salivary glands, nasal and paranasal sinuses, and nasopharynx. But it does not address cancers of the brain, thyroid, or esophagus because they are very different in terms of symptoms and treatment. RESOURCES: Head and Neck Cancer Survivor...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - March 23, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancer Salivary Gland Cancer Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer Nasopharyngeal Cancer Source Type: news

Cuba Has Made At Least 3 Major Medical Innovations That We Need
By most measures, the United States' business-friendly environment has proven to be fertile for medical innovation. Compared to other countries, America has filed the most patents in the life sciences, is conducting most of the world's clinical trials and has published the most biomedical research. That's what makes the medical prominence of Cuba all the more surprising to those who view a free market as an essential driver of scientific discovery. Cuba is very poor, and yet the country has some of the healthiest, most long-lived residents in the world -- as well as a medical invention or two that could run circl...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Electronic health records can help catch undiagnosed cases of Type 2 diabetes, UCLA researchers find
In 2012, a group of UCLA researchers set out to mine thousands of electronic health records for a more accurate and less expensive way to identify people who have undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes. The researchers got much more than they bargained for. Not only did they develop an algorithm with the potential to vastly increase the number of correct diagnoses of the disease by refining the pool of candidates who are put forward for screening; they also uncovered several previously unknown risk factors for diabetes, including a history of sexual and gender identity disorders, intestinal infections and a category of illnesses...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 16, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Cancer Centers Urge More People to Get the HPV Vaccine
By Stacy Simon The American Cancer Society is supporting a call-to-action from dozens of National Cancer Institute-designated Cancer Centers across the US urging action to increase vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV vaccines protect against high-risk types of the virus that cause most cervical cancers. The virus is also linked to cancers of the vulva, vagina, penis, anus, and throat. Despite this, vaccination rates across the US remain low. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), only 40% of girls and 21% of boys in the US have received all 3 doses of the vaccine. The CDC recomme...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - January 27, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cervical Cancer Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Anal Cancer Vulvar Cancer Vaginal Cancer Source Type: news

Medtech approvals: FDA releases November 2015 PMAs
The FDA today released its list of the pre-market approvals it granted for medical devices in November 2015: Summary of PMA Originals & Supplements Approved Originals: 3 Supplements: 69 Summary of PMA Originals Under Review Total Under Review: 57 Total Active: 30 Total On Hold: 27 Summary of PMA Supplements Under Review Total Under Review: 583 Total Active: 433 Total On Hold: 150 Summary of All PMA Submissions Originals: 4 Supplements: 75 Summary of PMA Supplement PMA Approval/Denial Decision Times Number of Approvals: 69 Number of Denials: 0 Average Days Fr Receipt to Decision (Total Time): 193.4 FDA Tim...
Source: Mass Device - January 22, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Source Type: news

Boston Medical Center receives $1 million grant to improve communication about HPV vaccine
(Boston University Medical Center) Researchers at Boston Medical Center were awarded a three-year, $1.04 million grant from the American Cancer Society to expand an education-based pilot program to improve communication between pediatric physicians and their patients about the Human Papillomavirus vaccine. During the pilot study, vaccination rates increased as physicians became more educated about HPV vaccination. This grant will expand this intervention to five additional community health centers in Boston to test its efficacy in a larger, diverse group of patients and families. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 22, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

3 environmental issues disproportionately affecting Hispanic patients
Special factors influencing the health of the Hispanic population stepped into the spotlight during a panel discussion last week.  Learn what health care researchers are discovering about environmental factors that impact the health of this underserved patient population. Researchers and physicians at the event hosted by the AMA Minority Affairs Section and the National Hispanic Medical Association discussed how multiple factors—ranging from a lack of Hispanic physicians in medicine to lurking environmental contaminants—shape Hispanic health. Some of the top issues they discussed included: The impac...
Source: AMA Wire - October 13, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: amamod Source Type: news

Medtech approvals: FDA releases June 2015 PMAs
The FDA today released its list of the pre-market approvals it granted for medical devices in June 2015: Summary of PMA Originals & Supplements Approved Originals: 5 Supplements: 80 Summary of PMA Originals Under Review Total Under Review: 53 Total Active: 22 Total On Hold: 31 Summary of PMA Supplements Under Review Total Under Review: 575 Total Active: 418 Total On Hold: 157 Summary of All PMA Submissions Originals: 4 Supplements: 72 Summary of PMA Supplement PMA Approval/Denial Decision Times Number of Approvals: 80 Number of Denials: 0 Average Days Fr Receipt to Decision (Total Time): 115.2 FDA Time: 9...
Source: Mass Device - August 20, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Source Type: news

Merck’s 9-Valent HPV Vaccine, GARDASIL®9, Recommended by CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices for Females Aged 9-26 and Males Aged 9-21
Dateline City: KENILWORTH, N.J. KENILWORTH, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Merck (NYSE: MRK), known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, announced today that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) voted to include GARDASIL®9 (Human Papillomavirus 9-valent Vaccine, Recombinant) in the recommendations for use of HPV vaccines. GARDASIL 9 has been added to the routine recommendations for vaccination of 11- and 12- year-old females and males. The vaccination series can be started ...
Source: Merck.com - Corporate News - February 26, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Vaccine News Corporate News Latest News Source Type: news

What You Should Know Before You Schedule Your Next Doctor Appointment
Before we were able to Google our every itch and twinge and ache, we had very different relationships with our doctors. “In the early years of my career, information was something the doctor had and the patient didn’t,” Dr. Michael L. LeFevre, a professor and physician at the University of Missouri, tells The Huffington Post. Today, he says, patients bring their information to him for his input. “They want my opinion about how good the information is and what it means and how to interpret it for them in their lives.” Of course, the Internet is rife with misinformation, and sometimes a well-m...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why Some Vaccines Require More Than One Dose
Despite being declared beaten in 2000, measles is back, due largely to declining vaccination rates in parts of the United States. "We should not be in this boat," Dr. Pritish Tosh, an infectious diseases physician and researcher at the Mayo Clinic, told The Huffington Post. "This is a completely preventable disease." That's because of the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine, which Tosh called "phenomenal" in its ability to protect large percentages of the general population. The vaccine is one of several different vaccines, however, that are given in multiple doses. Children receive the firs...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 7, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Interim Guidance Released on Primary High-Risk HPV Testing for Cervical Cancer (FREE)
By Kelly Young Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD, and André Sofair, MD, MPH High-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) testing can be used as an alternative to cytology or co-testing for primary cervical cancer screening, according to new interim guidance from a … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - January 12, 2015 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Docs suggest HPV screening first for cervical cancer
(Reuters Health) - Two medical organizations have recommended testing for the human papillomavirus (HPV) to screen women for cervical cancer before using a Papanicolaou – or Pap – smear for screening. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 8, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Screening HPV infection alone more accurate than Pap test in detection of cervical cancer
(Elsevier) Screening for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection alone gives more accurate results than Pap testing for cervical cancer, say the authors of two papers to published today in the journal Gynecologic Oncology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 8, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

HPV urine test could screen for cervical cancer
Conclusion This systematic review and meta-analysis indicates that urine tests for detecting HPV DNA might be feasible for screening women for cervical cancer based on an evidence base of 14 diverse studies involving 1,443 women. While it is feasible this type of test might be useful for screening, there were many limitations in the evidence base reviewed. This means its effectiveness as a screening tool is still up for debate and is unproven. Issues include: the large variation between individual studies for participant characteristics the large variation in estimates of test sensitivity and specificity between ind...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 17, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Medical practice Source Type: news