The Wheat Belly “ No Change Rule ” to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes and Accelerate Weight Loss
Follow the simple Wheat Belly No Change Rule for fingerstick blood sugars and you maximize your chances of getting rid of type 2 diabetes and accelerating weight loss. By becoming non-diabetic or at least minimizing it, you are freed from the awful health consequences of this disease, as well as extending life considerably. The No Change Rule also helps reverse insulin resistance that blocks weight loss. Transcript: Hi everybody. Doctor William Davis here. I want to talk about something I call the Wheat Belly “No Change Rule” — that is, no change in blood sugar — comparing a pre-meal to ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - January 21, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates diabetes no change rule undoctored Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs

ZERO tolerance for hypoglycemia
As more and more type 2 diabetics discover the Wheat Belly and other low-carb lifestyles, they are also discovering how rapidly and easily blood sugars drop. As diabetics become less diabetic–a process that can occur VERY quickly, often within 24 hours of removing all wheat/grains from their diet–but they are taking insulin or certain diabetes drugs, there is potential for hypoglycemia or low blood sugar. Low blood sugar from diabetes drugs can be dangerous and should be avoided at all costs. (Imagine if a non-diabetic started administering insulin or blood sugar-reducing drugs–it would result in life-thr...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - December 23, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates blood sugar diabetes undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs

How NOT to have high blood pressure
Patient suffers from hypertension. Woman is measuring blood pressure with monitor. The average American’s lifetime risk for developing high blood pressure is 90%, even using the lax definition of hypertension in clinical studies (that typically don’t label a BP high unless it is 140/90 mmHg or higher, even though we know that, for example, risk for stroke and cardiovascular begin to rise with a systolic, or top, value of only 115 mmHg). Here’s a checklist that, if followed, allow the majority of people with high blood pressure (BP) to reduce both systolic and diastolic values over time and be freed of the...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 31, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle gluten grains high blood pressure hypertension undoctored Source Type: blogs

Now NOT to have high blood pressure
Patient suffers from hypertension. Woman is measuring blood pressure with monitor. The average American’s lifetime risk for developing high blood pressure is 90%, even using the lax definition of hypertension in clinical studies (that typically don’t label a BP high unless it is 140/90 mmHg or higher, even though we know that, for example, risk for stroke and cardiovascular begin to rise with a systolic, or top, value of only 115 mmHg). Here’s a checklist that, if followed, allow the majority of people with high blood pressure (BP) to reduce both systolic and diastolic values over time and be freed of the...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 31, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle gluten grains high blood pressure hypertension undoctored Source Type: blogs

I ’ve seen over 8,000 medical professionals. Here’s what I’ve learned.
Today, I am a 40-year old with type 2 diabetes. I have been on glyburide since I was diagnosed four years ago and am otherwise healthy, although my blood pressure today is 140/96. I don’t check my glucose levels at home because I don’t have a monitor. Typically, I avoid sweets, but my diet is high in natural sugars, carbohydrates and starches. The only exercise I get is walking around on the floor of my retail sales job. My diabetic mother died of kidney failure, and I don’t want that to happen to me, which is why I’m seeing my doctor today. Today, I am Lucy. Tomorrow, I will be someone else. In rea...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 30, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/esther-covington" rel="tag" > Esther Covington < /a > Tags: Patient Medical school Source Type: blogs

Antitrust and Generic Drugs – A Rare Combination
This article outlines several different actions focused on generic pharmaceutical manufacturers that are presently working their way through the courts. On December 12, 2016, two former senior generic pharmaceutical executives were charged for their alleged roles in conspiracies to fix prices, rig bids, and allocate customers for certain generic drugs. Jeffrey Glazer, the former CEO of Heritage Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (“Heritage”), and Jason Malek, the former president of Heritage, allegedly conspired to fix prices, rig bids, and allocate customers for two different generics: an antibiotic (doxycycline hyclate) ...
Source: Policy and Medicine - March 2, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

ZERO TOLERANCE for hypoglycemia
Wheat elimination starts you powerfully on the path to reversing diabetes. We’ve seen it many times and it continues to develop in people who kiss their bagels, pretzels, and processed foods booby-trapped with wheat and grains goodbye. But, as diabetics become less diabetic–a process that can occur VERY quickly, often within days of removing all wheat and grain products from their diet–but they are taking insulin or certain diabetes drugs, there is potential for hypoglycemia or low blood sugar. Low blood sugar from diabetes drugs can be dangerous and should be avoided at all costs. (Imagine if a non-diabe...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 2, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle diabetes glucose gluten grains hypoglycemia insulin Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 60-year-old woman with gastroparesis
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 60-year-old woman is evaluated during a routine follow-up appointment. She has gastroparesis associated with long-standing type 2 diabetes mellitus. Improved blood sugar control and efforts to eat small, frequent meals did not result in symptom improvement. In addition to these interventions, metoclopramide was started 6 months ago, after which her nausea and periodic vomiting resolved. However, she has had some restlessness at night with the urge to repeatedly cross and uncross her legs. Several weeks...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 5, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Diabetes GI Source Type: blogs

The Orange Juice Clue
The parents of a 16-month-old boy who presented to the ED were concerned that he was too sleepy. His initial point-of-care glucose was noted to be 42 mg/dL, and he was somnolent but arousable, and was given orange juice.   Twenty minutes later, the child’s symptoms had completely resolved. Toxicology was consulted for evaluation of a possible toxic ingestion, and a medication inventory was recommended.   Differential Diagnosis of Hypoglycemia in Children n Ethanol intoxication n Beta blocker intoxication n Salicylate toxicity n Sulfonylurea n Insulin injection n Endocrine disorder (hypopituitarism...
Source: The Tox Cave - September 1, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

The Orange Juice Clue
The parents of a 16-month-old boy who presented to the ED were concerned that he was too sleepy. His initial point-of-care glucose was noted to be 42 mg/dL, and he was somnolent but arousable, and was given orange juice.   Twenty minutes later, the child’s symptoms had completely resolved. Toxicology was consulted for evaluation of a possible toxic ingestion, and a medication inventory was recommended.   Differential Diagnosis of Hypoglycemia in Children n Ethanol intoxication n Beta blocker intoxication n Salicylate toxicity n Sulfonylurea n Insulin injection n Endocrine disorder (hypopituitarism, Addison&...
Source: The Tox Cave - September 1, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

If you have diabetes: NO low blood sugars!
Wheat elimination starts you powerfully on the path to reversing diabetes. We’ve seen it many times and it continues to develop in people who kiss their bagels, pretzels, and processed foods booby-trapped with wheat goodbye. But, as diabetics become less diabetic–a process that can occur VERY quickly, often within days of removing all wheat products from their diet–but they are taking insulin or certain diabetes drugs, there is potential for hypoglycemia or low blood sugar. Low blood sugar from diabetes drugs can be dangerous and should be avoided at all costs. (Imagine if a non-diabetic started administ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 28, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle blood sugar diabetes gluten grains hypoglycemia Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 74-year-old man with fever and chills
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 74-year-old man is evaluated in the emergency department for a 3-day history of fever and chills as well as confusion. He has a 5-week history of a nonhealing ulcer on the plantar surface of his left foot. He has diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and peripheral vascular disease for which he takes metformin, glyburide, lisinopril, chlorthalidone, and aspirin. He has no known medication allergies. On physical examination, temperature is 39.0 °C (102.2 °F), blood pressure is 92/60 mm Hg, pulse rate...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 17, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Diabetes Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

How NOT to have diabetes
If you want type 2 diabetes , follow conventional advice to cut fat and eat more “healthy whole grains.” (This is also true for type 1 diabetes in susceptible individuals with pancreatic beta cell autoimmunity triggered by wheat gliadin or corn zein.) But what if you don’t want to follow the footsteps of the two thirds of Americans and Canadians who are now diabetic or pre-diabetic? What if you don’t want the expense and side-effects of oral drugs and insulin–one of the most powerful weight gain drugs around? What if you don’t want to lose your eyesight, develop cardiovascular disea...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - January 8, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle blood sugar bowel flora diabetes gluten-free low-carb resistant starch vitamin D Source Type: blogs

Blood Sugar: Tool at Your Fingertips
Here is an excerpt from Wheat Belly Total Health that discusses how to use a glucose meter to accelerate weight loss. The same strategy can be used to reverse type 2 diabetes as much as possible in as short a time as possible. (Taken from Chapter 7: Grainless Living Day-to-Day.) A blood sugar meter used pre- and post-meal can be a very powerful tool for weight loss and the reversal of metabolic distortions like high blood sugar. But you have to know how to apply the information. Many people are frightened at the prospect of getting their blood checked for anything, and are particularly frightened by the prospect of checkin...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 20, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle blood sugar diabetes fingerstick glucometer glucose insulin Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 72-year-old unconscious woman in the ER
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 72-year-old woman is evaluated in the emergency department for loss of consciousness. Her son, who brought her in, says she seemed confused and agitated when he spoke to her on the telephone less than 2 hours ago. The patient has an 8-year history of type 2 diabetes mellitus. She had strict glycemic control (average hemoglobin HbA1c level, 6.2%) until last month when she had an infected ulcer between the third and fourth toes of the right foot that resulted in amputation of the middle toe 1 week ago. A...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 20, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Diabetes Emergency Endocrinology Source Type: blogs

Gestational Diabetes: More Treatment Approaches
By Amy Campbell If you've been reading about gestational diabetes over the past couple of weeks, you might be thinking that it seems like an awful lot of work to manage it. You're right, it is. Remember that gestational diabetes is diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. If you already have diabetes, then you know the amount of effort it takes to try and control it. One of the positive aspects about gestational diabetes (GDM) is that it pretty much disappears after the baby is born. And of course, nothing tops the reward and joy of a happy, healthy baby! Last week I wrote about the ways in which GDM is managed. Not surprisi...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - September 23, 2013 Category: Diabetes Authors: Amy Campbell Source Type: blogs

Severe Lows Occur Often in People With Type 2
This study suggests that we should pay much closer attention to hypoglycemia, even in poorly controlled patients. Providers should explain the symptoms of hypoglycemia, how to treat it, and how to avoid it — for example, by not skipping meals. Most of all, providers should ask all their diabetic patients whether they've experienced hypoglycemia, even those patients with very high average levels of blood sugar." The researchers also recommended that evaluations of the quality of diabetes care take into account side effects such as hypoglycemia that are associated with treatment. "While aggressive treatment...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - August 2, 2013 Category: Diabetes Authors: Diane Fennell Source Type: blogs

Zero tolerance for hypoglycemia
Wheat elimination starts you powerfully on the path to reversing diabetes. We’ve seen it many times and it continues to develop in people who kiss their bagels, pretzels, and processed foods booby-trapped with wheat goodbye. But, as diabetics become less diabetic–a process that can occur VERY quickly, often within days of removing all wheat products from their diet–but they are taking insulin or certain diabetes drugs, there is potential for hypoglycemia or low blood sugar. Low blood sugar from diabetes drugs can be dangerous and should be avoided at all costs. (Imagine if a non-diabetic started administ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 20, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Diabetes Source Type: blogs

Start With Three Drugs?
By David Spero A new study says that people newly diagnosed with Type 2 can do better if they are immediately started on a three-drug combo. Does this make sense to you? Is it good science or bad medicine? Muhammad A. Abdul-Ghani, MD, from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, presented the findings at the ADA Scientific Sessions in Chicago. The study enrolled 155 people with Type 2 diabetes. The average time after diabetes diagnosis was five months. None of them were taking diabetes medications at the beginning of the trial. Their average HbA1c was 8.6%. Half the subjects got "conventional t...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - July 10, 2013 Category: Diabetes Authors: David Spero Source Type: blogs

CME - When Old Beliefs Won’t Budge: Evaluating Entrenched Attitudes and Resistance to Change Among Healthcare Professionals
Each year, the Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions (ACEHP) holds its annual meeting, bringing together hundreds of thousands of continuing education professionals and stakeholders.  During this past year’s meeting, there was an interesting poster entitled: “When Old Beliefs Won’t Budge: Evaluating Entrenched Attitudes and Resistance to Change Among Health Care Professionals.”    The poster was presented by Carole Drexel, PhD, CCEMP, Anne Jacobson, MPH, CCEMP, and Jay M. Katz, MA, CCEMP, on behalf of the Potomac Center for Medical Education.  The...
Source: Policy and Medicine - February 18, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 71-year-old man with new dyspnea on exertion
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians.A 71-year-old man is evaluated in the emergency department for new dyspnea on exertion. He has a 15-year history of type 2 diabetes mellitus and has had a number of changes in his medications over the past 12 weeks to improve glycemic control. His dosage of metformin has been increased to 1000 mg/d, glyburide to 10 mg/d, and pioglitazone to 45 mg/d. Within the past week, bedtime insulin glargine was initiated.On physical examination, blood pressure is 140/90 mm Hg, pulse rate is 90/min, and respiration rate is...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 27, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Meds Diabetes Heart Source Type: blogs

New to Diabetes: What's Next? (Part 2)
By Amy Campbell There's a lot to juggle when you have diabetes, and at times, you may feel as if you're in a circus. Between balancing eating, physical activity, medication, and appointments (not to mention all of the other things that you need to do every day), it's not surprising that many people tune out and throw up their hands. "It's too hard to have diabetes," they say. Yes, it can be hard. But remember that you have tools available to you to let you know how you're doing. It's much like the dashboard in your car. Little lights come on when there's a problem or something that needs your attention. Gauges t...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - January 14, 2013 Category: Diabetes Authors: Amy Campbell Source Type: blogs

Insulin v. Triple oral therapy for DM
Diabetes Care 12/23/09 –   “Insulin is the most effective hypoglycemic agent in our treatment armamentarium and is now recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines as the second agent added after metformin” (FTA). Despite this fact (or because some of us were unaware of this guideline), physicians often prefer to max out that second and third oral medication before turning to insulin. An article in Diabetes Care looks at a comparison between a three drug regimen and insulin + metformin for newly diagnosed DM. The study compared 2 groups of 29 subjects that were newly diagnos...
Source: Consider The Evidence: Med/Peds Journal Roundup - January 3, 2010 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Authors: medblog Tags: diabetes Source Type: blogs

Dropping the ball on glucose testing
I guess one of the things I haven’t been particularly good at in my caregiver duties for Pops is making sure he tests his blood glucose regularly. Whenever I ask if he’s testing, he says he tests “once a week or so”, and – because his blood sugar has been under control for so long – I’ve been letting it go at that. Pops was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes a number of years ago, long before 2005 when I became so involved in monitoring his healthcare. Back in the beginning, I know he was pretty diligent about checking his blood glucose daily (as recommended) and, with the help of medi...
Source: Caregiver Notes - April 24, 2008 Category: Caregivers Authors: Jeff Muise Tags: Caregiver lifestyle Caregiving support Senior Health Alzheimer's disease blog blogger caregiver blog diabetes diabetes type II glucose testing jeff muise parents Source Type: blogs

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Hi...new here. I was diagnosed in March, 2005 with diabetes. They started treating me as a type 2 diabetic. I was 39 and losing weight (down to 116#) which was not the typical type 2. After further testing they found I have the antibodies that show beta cell destruction...so I am type 1 (or LADA). I stopped the Glyburide since it was flogging my pancreas to create more insulin with what little ability it had left. Now on MDI of Novolog.It's been close to one year and sometimes feels like an eternity. I started this post to just put my thoughts somewhere about this disease and me. (Source: Sweetsnomo)
Source: Sweetsnomo - February 24, 2006 Category: Diabetes Source Type: blogs