Cortisol Therapy Still Leaves Kids Obese (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Despite a reduction in steroid doses over the last decade, a sizeable proportion of children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia are still obese and hypertensive, researchers found. (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - July 11, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Quality of life, steroid use assessed in adults with CAH (Endocrine Today, 28 June 2013)
A new study from the Society's Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Adult Study Executive (CaHASE) has found that patients with CAH have a negative perception of their quality of life. This is in relation to their weight and the dose and type of medication they take.  The research was published in the European Journal of Endocrinology. Full article (site registration may be required) CAH Adult Study Executive (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - July 1, 2013 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Body fat, insulin may be key in adrenal disorder (Medpage Today, 13 June 2013)
Research by the Society for Endocrinology Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Adult Study Executive (CaHASE) on health and quality of life outcomes relating to treatment regimen in adults with CAH is published in European Journal of Endocrinology and Clinical Endocrinology. Full article (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - June 17, 2013 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Body Fat, Insulin May Be Key in Adrenal Disorder (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Quality of life in congenital adrenal hyperplasia varied significantly by patients' body fat and insulin resistance, suggesting weight loss might help improve physical and mental function, British investigators reported. (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - June 13, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

TARTs in CAH
Few studies on exist on the prevalence of testicular adrenal rest tumours (TARTs) in boys and adolescent males with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). Aycan and colleagues assessed the long-term treatment outcomes of this patient group in a cohort of sixty individuals. They found a TART prevalence of 18.3% from 4 years of age, which responded well to high-dose steroid treatment. They recommend ultrasound screening of CAH patients from a young age to prevent infertility in adulthood. Read the full article in Aycan and colleagues (2013) Clinical Endocrinology 78 667—672. DOI: 10.1111/cen.12033 (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - May 8, 2013 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Screening for CAH Will Save Girls' Lives, TooScreening for CAH Will Save Girls' Lives, Too
Screening of newborns for congenital adrenal hyperplasia will save more lives than previously thought because it also picks up females with the condition, new research shows. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 27, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

Unique Study Highlights Importance Of Universal Newborn Screening For Lethal Genetic Disorder
Contrary to current belief, routine newborn screening improves the detection of the lethal form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) in girls as well as boys, saving lives in both sexes, according to a unique study of CAH during the last 100 years published Online First in The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology. Babies are routinely screened for CAH in most developed countries, but this is not yet the case in all countries, including the UK and Australia... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 26, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics / Children's Health Source Type: news

Transition in endocrinology
Two articles in the January issue of Clinical Endocrinology tackle the issue of transition care. Gleeson and colleagues, in their single-centre study, evaluated whether young people with congenital adrenal hyperplasia have been successfully transitioned from paediatric care to specialist adult services, finding that in half of cases were lost to follow-up on transfer to adult services. Downing and colleagues made a similar evaluation across a wider range of endocrine conditions, covering services from Manchester, Lancashire and South Cumbria. They found that a quarter of paediatric patients did not attend the Young Person&...
Source: Society for Endocrinology - January 11, 2013 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news