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Link between stress in pregnancy and ADHD unfounded
Conclusion Despite the media headlines and scaremongering, ADHD is never mentioned in the study. The researchers cite animal studies which suggest increased levels of the stress hormone cortisol may speed up development before birth. They say this may prevent proper maturation of the organs and so could cause any "mental or physical illness" occurring later in life, such as ADHD. However, for ethical reasons, the levels of stress hormones in the amniotic fluid were only measured once in this study. This means we are unable to tell whether they changed during periods of maternal stress or during the pregnancy. Tho...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy/child Mental health Source Type: news

Mom's Postpartum Body Serves As Painful Reminder Of Pregnancy Loss
Struggling with body image after pregnancy is not unusual. What makes Jessica McCoy’s story unique is that she is struggling with postpartum body image after a pregnancy loss, meaning that each stretch mark or extra pound is a reminder of the baby who isn’t there.  The 27-year-old mother posted about the painful experience on Instagram, along with a photo of herself wearing jeans and a bra. The emotional caption describes the feeling of looking at her uncovered body in the mirror since her loss. “Every day I get clothes on and they’re tight,” she wrote. “And every day I&rs...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Precautions Should A Childcare Center Take For A Child with Hepatitis C Infection?
Discussion It is estimated that 180 million people worldwide are infected with Hepatitis C (HCV) which includes ~11 million children. In the United States it is estimated that there were 30,500 acute HCV cases in 2014, and 2.7-3.9 million people with chronic HCV. Many infections are not identified. It is estimated that “…only 5-15% of HCV-infected children in the United States are identified.” Problems associated with HCV include acute hepatitis (including fever, malaise, dark-urine, abdominal pain, jaundice, appetite loss, nausea, emesis, clay-colored stools), acute fulminant hepatitis (not common in c...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - January 9, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

OB-GYNs: Stick with CDC Zika Guidelines
(MedPage Today) -- Special SMFM session clarifies role of serial ultrasound, amniocentesis (Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease)
Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease - December 30, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

What Ohio's 20-Week Abortion Ban Law Will Really Mean For Women
Ohio just became the 18th state to pass an arbitrary ban on abortions after 20 weeks.  The new law, which Gov. John Kasich (R) signed Tuesday, outlaws an extremely rare procedure. Only about 1 percent of all abortions take place after 20 weeks, and most are the result of doctors finding birth defects that were undetectable in earlier screenings. The ban will push women to travel out of state if they discover a serious defect during a second trimester ultrasound, adding another layer of logistical and financial difficulty to an already complicated termination procedure, says Dr. Jennifer K. Hsia, a clini...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Ohio's 20-Week Abortion Ban Law Will Really Mean For Women
Ohio just became the 18th state to pass an arbitrary ban on abortions after 20 weeks.  The new law, which Gov. John Kasich (R) signed Tuesday, outlaws an extremely rare procedure. Only about 1 percent of all abortions take place after 20 weeks, and most are the result of doctors finding birth defects that were undetectable in earlier screenings. The ban will push women to travel out of state if they discover a serious defect during a second trimester ultrasound, adding another layer of logistical and financial difficulty to an already complicated termination procedure, says Dr. Jennifer K. Hsia, a clini...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Second opinion gives unborn baby second chance
Seven-month-old Charlotte Bent is hitting all of her developmental milestones — smiling, laughing, playing peek-a-boo, bearing weight on her legs. Her parents, Jennifer and Keith, are overjoyed. “It’s a complete 180-degree turn from where we thought we would be this time last year,” says Jennifer. After struggling to conceive their second child, the couple was thrilled when Jennifer became pregnant. The results of genetic testing were normal and confirmed they would be welcoming a daughter in April. Jennifer felt the baby’s first kicks on Nov. 23, 2015. The next day, she was scheduled for an a...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 29, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Advanced Fetal Care Center bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria Dr. Benjamin Warf Dr. Christopher Elitt Second opinion ventriculomegaly Source Type: news

Cell-Free Fetal DNA Test Cost-effective as a Prenatal Screen Cell-Free Fetal DNA Test Cost-effective as a Prenatal Screen
A noninvasive prenatal test that examines cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma can help rule out common aneuploidies, such as Down syndrome, and reduce costs and risks related to amniocentesis.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pathology & Lab Medicine News Source Type: news

Precision medicine: What to know about cell-free DNA screening
With more women seeking tests for common chromosome conditions in pregnancy, many are now opting for newly developed non-invasive cell-free DNA (cfDNA) screening. But like all screening tests, it has limitations and isn ’t appropriate for all patients. Find out how cfDNA works and which of your patients may benefit from the screening. Anew continuing medical education (CME) module, developed by AMA in partnership with Scripps Translational Science Institute and The Jackson Laboratory, is helping physicians understand what the test detects, which patients benefit most from it, what to consider when ordering the test ...
Source: AMA Wire - August 31, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Troy Parks Source Type: news

Evidence of link between Zika virus and birth defect 'boosted'
ConclusionThis was a case study of two women in Brazil who had clinical symptoms of the Zika virus during pregnancy. Their babies were later diagnosed with microcephaly while still in the womb after ultrasound examination. Researchers aimed to detect the Zika virus in amniotic fluid and conduct DNA analysis to ascertain the geographic origin of the virus.   Since 2015, Brazil has seen 4,783 cases of microcephaly in newborn babies, 20 times higher than in previous years. Microcephaly is associated with a number of causes, including: genetic disorders alcohol and drug use maternal malnutrition transmission ...
Source: NHS News Feed - February 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Pregnancy/child Neurology Source Type: news

OB-GYNS: Stick with CDC Zika Guidelines
(MedPage Today) -- Special SMFM session clarifies role of serial ultrasound, amniocentesis (Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease)
Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease - February 6, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study may show a way to predict whether children with a genetic disorder will develop autism or psychosis
Doctors and researchers have long known that children who are missing about 60 genes on a certain chromosome are at a significantly elevated risk for developing either a disorder on the autism spectrum or psychosis — that is, any mental disorder characterized by delusions and hallucinations, including schizophrenia. But there has been no way to predict which child with the abnormality might be at risk for which disorder. New findings by researchers at UCLA and the University of Pittsburgh are the first to suggest a potential way to make that determination. In a study published in PLOS One, the researchers report havi...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 24, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Will Even a Cholesterol Test Help Identify Cancer?
Image via Shutterstock By Meredith Salisbury Early detection is one of the most effective ways to beat cancer. That's why some recent studies, in which scientists detected it in people long before symptoms began, have cancer researchers so excited. The coolest part? These scientists weren't even looking for signs of cancer. DNA-based detection tools have gotten sensitive enough that it now appears possible to identify precancerous cells. For years, people thought cancer was like a toggle switch: a good cell goes bad, and flip! Cancer. If that cell divides rapidly enough, and successfully evades the immune system, it grows ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - July 20, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

New Down's syndrome blood test 'would cut miscarriage risk'
Experts believe a new non-invasive Down's syndrome test which could soon be available on the NHS would radically change pregnancy screening (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - June 6, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: test scan pregnancy baby pregnant chromosome ultrasound amniocentesis Down's syndrome Source Type: news

New Down’s syndrome test more accurate than current screening
Conclusion This large study has shown that the new cfDNA test is better than current standard screening at detecting three trisomy conditions during pregnancy. The confidence in accurately identifying affected pregnancies was strongest for Down’s syndrome. There were much wider confidence intervals for the other two conditions. The cfDNA test was not 100% accurate, as there were false positive results for each condition, though much fewer than with standard screening. Around 3% of the cfDNA tests did not produce a result. Careful consideration and further research may be needed to decide the best approach in these c...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 2, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics/stem cells Medical practice Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

Newer Test for Down Syndrome Called 'Major Advance'
But it won't eliminate need for invasive diagnostics such as amniocentesis, doctors say (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - April 2, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Robotic surgery gives Connecticut toddler born with kidney defect a fresh start
Payton Grassia and her mom, Jessica Payton Grassia is all things preschooler. She loves finger painting and outdoor play, has a “big personality,” her mom says, and recently added big sister to her list of credentials. But beyond her sweet smile and playful charm, this spunky three-and-a-half-year-old is also a fighter. And her fight began before she was even born. Prenatal testing While pregnant, Payton’s mom, Jessica Grassia, had an amniocentesis, a test used to identify potential congenital defects in babies. The test revealed that her unborn baby, at 28 weeks in utero, had a duplex collecting system&...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - February 23, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: All posts Diseases & conditions Our patients’ stories Source Type: news

DNA Blood Test Gives Women A New Option For Prenatal Screening
A simple blood test can analyze bits of fetal DNA leaked in the mother's bloodstream. It's less risky than invasive alternatives like amniocentesis, but it doesn't tell as much about fetal health.» E-Mail This (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - January 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

Amniocentesis Needles Market and Industry Size 2014 and Forecast 2020:...
Marketresearchreports.biz has added a new research report on the global Amniocentesis Needles market to its collection.(PRWeb January 21, 2015)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/01/prweb12460700.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - January 22, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Let's (Cautiously) Celebrate the "New Eugenics"
It's a subject doctors, health providers and medical experts are discussing feverishly, but often quietly: whether parents should undergo genetic tests, either before conception or after, to determine if their unborn child might have a serious genetic disorder. Hanging over the debate is the specter of eugenics--fears that the ability to manipulate the health of our future babies could devalue the sanctity of life. About three percent of babies in the United States are born with a major structural or genetic birth defect. It's a bracing occurrence for a family and a multi-billion hit to our already strained medical sys...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 30, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study Finds DNA Screening Better At Identifying Prenatal Genetic Defects
BOSTON (CBS) — It’s the news no expecting mom wants to hear, “there was a chance she was going to be stillborn or wouldn’t live past her first year.” That’s what Jennifer Fontaine’s doctors told her after she underwent genetic screening in the first trimester of her pregnancy. The traditional blood test had turned up a chromosome abnormality in the fetus. Then the Groveland woman had a new test which actually screens DNA. “The DNA results came back perfect. Nothing was wrong with chromosome 18 and she was perfect,” says Jennifer. She gave birth to a healthy baby girl na...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 26, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kckatzman Tags: Health Healthwatch Heard On WBZ NewsRadio 1030 Local Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Watch Listen CBS Boston Diane Stern Genetic Screenings Paula Ebben Tufts Medical Source Type: news

Books: Separating a Son From a Down Syndrome Diagnosis in ‘Raising Henry’
In her memoir, an Upper West Side intellectual whose son has Down syndrome attempts to set people straight: it is a disability, not a tragedy.     (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 16, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: By SUSANNAH MEADOWS Tags: Down Syndrome Medicine and Health Books and Literature Amniocentesis Source Type: news

Medical Breakthrough Gives Couples Who Want Children New Hope
function cbs_video_wnplayer_9548969_start() { var WNVideoCanvas_vid9548969 = new WNVideoWidget("WNVideoCanvas", "WNVideoCanvas_vid9548969", "2"); //Playback options WNVideoCanvas_vid9548969.SetVariable("widgetId", 9548969); WNVideoCanvas_vid9548969.SetVariable("addThisDivId", "WNVideoCanvas_vid9548969_addThis"); WNVideoCanvas_vid9548969.SetVariable("incanvasAdDivId", "WNVideoCanvas_vid9548969_adDiv"); WNVideoCanvas_vid9548969.SetVariable("clipId", "9548969"); // Controls options WNVideoCanvas_vid9548969.Set...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 20, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: deanreddington Tags: Health Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Watch Listen cystic fibrosis Dr. Ian Hardy Fragile X Pompeii Disease Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis Spinal Muscular Atrophy Tay-Sachs Source Type: news

Topol Predicts Genomic Screening Will Replace AmniocentesisTopol Predicts Genomic Screening Will Replace Amniocentesis
Dr. Eric Topol explains why prenatal genomic screening may represent the biggest impact that genomics has had in medical practice today but that it also raises questions of ethics. Medscape (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health Blog Source Type: news

Will New Genetic Tests Lead to More and Earlier Abortions?Will New Genetic Tests Lead to More and Earlier Abortions?
New blood tests that screen fetal cells for genetic conditions/predispositions may replace amniocentesis someday, but will women decide to abort fetuses who, as adults, might get a disease? Medscape Business of Medicine (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - October 29, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care Commentary Source Type: news

Personal Health: Breakthroughs in Prenatal Screening
A new highly accurate and noninvasive screening test that relies on fetal DNA fragments found in the mother’s blood is helping reduce the number of women who undergo amniocentesis.     (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: By JANE E. BRODY Tags: Genetics and Heredity Family Personal Health Pregnancy and Childbirth Parenting Amniocentesis Featured Tests (Medical) Source Type: news

Well: Breakthroughs in Prenatal Screening
A new highly accurate and noninvasive screening test that relies on fetal DNA fragments found in the mother’s blood is helping reduce the number of women who undergo amniocentesis.     (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: By JANE E. BRODY Tags: Genetics and Heredity Family Personal Health Pregnancy and Childbirth Parenting Amniocentesis Featured Tests (Medical) Source Type: news

Books: Pregnant, and Disputing the Doctor
After having a child, Emily Oster wrote “Expecting Better,” a book that challenges the conventional wisdom on pregnancy.     (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 19, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: By CATHERINE SAINT LOUIS Tags: Pregnancy and Childbirth Books Amniocentesis Featured Oster, Emily Source Type: news

Blood Test Works for Detecting Down Syndrome (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Blood screening that accurately detected Down syndrome and other genetic fetal abnormalities in the first trimester could reduce the need for invasive testing with amniocentesis or chorionic villi sampling, researchers reported. (Source: MedPage Today OB/GYN)
Source: MedPage Today OB/GYN - June 7, 2013 Category: OBGYN Source Type: news

New Down’s syndrome blood test 'more reliable'
Conclusion The current study suggests that screening for trisomies 13, 18, and 21 using a DNA based maternal blood test may identify similar numbers of affected foetuses to the current screening test. However, the new screening test appears to be better at ruling out the condition in women with normal pregnancies, this means that fewer women would be offered unnecessary invasive diagnostic testing. There are a few important points to note: Not all women in this study had given birth when the study was published, and these babies will need to be assessed to make sure that no cases of trisomy were missed. If this test ...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics/stem cells Medical practice Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

Market Shakeup in Developing Maternal Blood Prenatal Diagnostics
Illumina, the leading provider of high throughput gene sequencing technology, announced Monday that it has agreed to purchase Verinata Health, who provide medical tests to determine fetal chromosomal abnormalities using a pregnant women's blood rather than invasive amniocentesis....Read Full Post (Source: About.com Biotech Biomedical)
Source: About.com Biotech Biomedical - January 7, 2013 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news