An investigation and replication of sleep-related cognitions, acceptance and behaviours as predictors of short- and long-term outcome in cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia

The objectives were to investigate the potential for sleep-related behaviours, acceptance and cognitions to predict outcome (insomnia severity) of cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). Baseline and outcome data from four randomised controlled trials (n = 276) were used. Predictors were the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep-10 (DBAS-10), Sleep-Related Behaviours Questionnaire (SRBQ), and Sleep Problems Acceptance Questionnaire (SPAQ), and empirically derived factors from a factor analysis combining all items at baseline (n = 835). Baseline values were used to predict post-treatment outcome, and pre-post changes in the predictors were used to predict follow-up outcomes after 3-6 months, 1 year, or 3-10 years, measured both as insomnia severity and as better or worse long-term sleep patterns. A majority (29 of 52) of predictions of insomnia severity were significant, but when controlling for insomnia severity, only two (DBAS-10 at short-term and SRBQ at mid-term follow-up) of the 12 predictions using established scales, and three of the 40 predictions using empirically derived factors, remained significant. The strongest predictor of a long-term, stable sleep pattern was insomnia severity reduction during treatment. Using all available predictors in an overfitted model, 21.2% of short- and 58.9% of long-term outcomes could be predicted. We conclude that although the explored constructs may have important roles in CBT-I, the present study does not supp...
Source: Journal of Sleep Research - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Source Type: research

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AbstractSleep disorders are linked to development of type 2 diabetes and increase the risk of developing diabetes complications. Treating sleep disorders might therefore play an important role in the prevention of diabetes progression. However, the detection and treatment of sleep disorders are not part of standardised care for people with type 2 diabetes. To highlight the importance of sleep disorders in people with type 2 diabetes, we provide a review of the literature on the prevalence of sleep disorders in type 2 diabetes and the association between sleep disorders and health outcomes, such as glycaemic control, microv...
Source: Diabetologia - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
J Sleep Res. 2021 Jul 30:e13451. doi: 10.1111/jsr.13451. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTResearch indicates a bidirectional relationship between sleep and anxiety, with findings suggesting anxiety can precede poor sleep and vice versa. Evidence suggests sleep-related thought processes associated with anxiety are involved in the maintenance of insomnia. Previous meta-analyses provide some evidence to suggest cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia moderately improves anxiety, yet little research has investigated the effect of other sleep interventions on anxiety symptoms. The aim of this meta-analysis was to review whether...
Source: Journal of Sleep Research - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
The objective of this study was to compare comorbidity and patient characteristics among patients having treatment for depression before and after implementation of cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) in a routine care internet treatment clinic. We hypothesized that insomnia comorbidity would be lower among patients having treatment for depression after the treatment for insomnia became available, and that depression levels would be high among patients in the insomnia treatment group compared to previous studies of insomnia. Patients were assessed face-to-face by physicians and guided through internet-delive...
Source: Journal of Sleep Research - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Significant clinical benefit was associated with the introduction of an evidence-based digital sleep intervention alongside other mental health interventions for depression and anxiety. Widespread deployment was achieved with immediate availability, minimal additional clinical time or staff training. This approach provides a feasible and highly scalable model for improving mental health outcomes in clinical services.PMID:34246110 | DOI:10.1016/j.brat.2021.103922
Source: Behaviour Research and Therapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: A scalable CBT sleep intervention is efficacious in buffering against sleep disturbance during pregnancy and benefitted sleep at 2-year postpartum, especially for individuals with insomnia symptoms during pregnancy. The intervention holds promise for implementation into routine perinatal care.PMID:34231450 | DOI:10.1017/S0033291721001860
Source: Psychological Medicine - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Source Type: research
Prisoner’s insomnia prevalence, insomnia associated factors and interventions with sleep as an outcome: a review and narrative analysis Chris Griffiths, Farah Hina International Journal of Prisoner Health, Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print, pp.- Insomnia is highly prevalent in prisoners. The purpose of this paper is a review of research evidence on interventions with sleep as an outcome (2000 to 2020) and rates of insomnia prevalence and associated factors in prisons (2015 to 2020). An internet-based search used Medline, PubMed, PsycINFO (EBSCOhost), Embase, Web of Science and Scopus. Seven...
Source: International Journal of Prisoner Health - Category: Criminology Authors: Source Type: research
Int J Prison Health. 2021 Jul 6;ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print). doi: 10.1108/IJPH-01-2021-0014.ABSTRACTPURPOSE: Insomnia is highly prevalent in prisoners. The purpose of this paper is a review of research evidence on interventions with sleep as an outcome (2000 to 2020) and rates of insomnia prevalence and associated factors in prisons (2015 to 2020).DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: An internet-based search used Medline, PubMed, PsycINFO (EBSCOhost), Embase, Web of Science and Scopus. Seven interventions and eight sleep prevalence or sleep-associated factor papers were identified.FINDINGS: Intervention research was very limite...
Source: International Journal of Prisoner Health - Category: Criminology Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusion The optimal management of sleep disorders in FM is complex and needs to be tailored to the individual patient. We have shown that there are varying degrees of efficacy throughout a range of commonly used drugs in FM. Unfortunately, lack of consistency in outcome measures between studies makes it difficult to draw definitive conclusions pertaining to superiority between these agents. Conversely, CBT interventions appear to show consistent sleep improvement in FM. It is not clear whether this translates to online variations of CBT. We believe that a longitudinal appraisal of sleep as a primar y variable, with...
Source: Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
Clin Psychol Rev. 2021 Apr 3;86:102027. doi: 10.1016/j.cpr.2021.102027. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTInsomnia is prevalent and debilitating, comprising sustained difficulties initiating or maintaining sleep. Cognitive-behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is a multicomponent intervention recommended as the first-line treatment, but the mediators of change remain unclear. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to synthesise and evaluate the evidence for potential mediators of CBT-I. Searches were performed for studies published until February 2021, reporting on mediation analyses with CBT-I. Seventeen unique sam...
Source: Clinical Psychology Review - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Source Type: research
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