Emergency Department Visits for Tick Bites - United States, January 2017-December 2019

MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2021 Apr 30;70(17):612-616. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm7017a2.ABSTRACTThe incidence of tickborne diseases in the United States is increasing; reported cases more than doubled from>22,000 in 2004 to>48,000 in 2016 (1). Ticks are responsible for approximately 95% of all locally acquired vectorborne diseases reported by states and the District of Columbia, with Lyme disease accounting for>80% of those cases (2). After a tick bite, persons might seek care at an emergency department (ED) for tick removal and to receive postexposure prophylaxis, which has been shown to effectively prevent Lyme disease when taken within 72 hours of a high-risk bite (3). Using data from CDC's National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP), investigators examined ED tick bite visits during January 2017-December 2019 by sex, age group, U.S. region, and seasonality. During this 36-month period, 149,364 ED tick bite visits were identified. Mean cumulative incidence was 49 ED tick bite visits per 100,000 ED visits overall; incidence was highest in the Northeast (110 per 100,000 ED visits). The seasonal distribution of ED tick bite visits was bimodal: the larger peak occurred during the spring and early summer, and the smaller peak occurred in the fall. This pattern aligns with the seasonality of a known and abundant human-biter, the blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis (4). Compared with other age groups, pediatric patients aged 0-9 years accounted for the highest number and i...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Source Type: research

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When we get an acute illness like the flu or a cold, we feel sick for a week or two and then get back to our usual lives. This is how illness is “supposed” to go. But what happens when illness doesn’t fit this bill? What do patients with chronic conditions like diabetes or multiple sclerosis, or with persistent symptoms of Lyme disease or long-haul COVID-19, do when they can’t go back to their normal lives? Having suffered from the latter two — tick-borne illnesses that have plagued me for two decades, and a case of COVID-19 that took four months to shake — I’ve learned a few lesso...
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Abstract Companion animals can become infected with tick-borne diseases (TBDs) and can become hosts of transmission to humans, thereby damaging human health. To clarify whether companion animals are infested by ticks harboring TBD pathogens in humans, we detected TBD pathogens in ticks collected from dogs and cats brought to animal hospitals in Yamagata Prefecture, Japan. Investigation of 164 adult ticks collected from 88 dogs and 41 cats during March-July 2018 revealed the predominant tick species as Ixodes ovatus (n = 95, 57.9%), followed by Ixodes nipponensis (37, 22.6%) and Haemaphysalis flava (10, 6.1%). The ...
Source: Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Jpn J Infect Dis Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 25 August 2020Source: Ticks and Tick-borne DiseasesAuthor(s): Malte M. Tetens, Rasmus Haahr, Ram B. Dessau, Karen A. Krogfelt, Jacob Bodilsen, Nanna S. Andersen, Jens K. Møller, Casper Roed, Claus B. Christiansen, Svend Ellermann-Eriksen, Jette M. Bangsborg, Klaus Hansen, Thomas L. Benfield, Christian Østergaard Andersen, Niels Obel, Lars H. Omland, Anne-Mette Lebech
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Publication date: Available online 25 August 2020Source: Ticks and Tick-borne DiseasesAuthor(s): Chinar Osman, Liam S. Carroll, Christina Petridou, Mark Walker, Louis W. Merton, Haider Katifi
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
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Source: Parasites and Vectors - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
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Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Autoimmune diseases Prevention Safety Source Type: blogs
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