No Evidence Found of Vertical Transmission of SARS-CoV-2

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2020 -- In a series of 101 newborns of mothers with perinatal severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), there was no clinical evidence of vertical transmission, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in...
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 10 October 2020Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): Hisakazu Yano, Ryuichi Nakano, Yuki Suzuki, Akiyo Nakano, Kei Kasahara, Hiroshi Hosoi
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Authors: Yepes-Pérez AF, Herrera-Calderon O, Sánchez-Aparicio JE, Tiessler-Sala L, Maréchal JD, Cardona-G W Abstract COVID-19 is a disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. Presently, there is no effective treatment for COVID-19. As part of the worldwide efforts to find efficient therapies and preventions, it has been reported the crystalline structure of the SARS-CoV-2 main protease Mpro (also called 3CLpro) bound to a synthetic inhibitor, which represents a major druggable target. The druggability of Mpro could be used for discovering drugs to treat COVID-19. A multil...
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
Conclusions: Early results of universal preoperative screening for COVID-19 demonstrates a low incidence and high rate of asymptomatic patients. Health care professionals, especially those at higher risk for the virus, should be aware of the challenges related to screening based solely on symptoms or travel history and consider universal screening for patients undergoing elective surgery. Level of Evidence: Level II.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Infection Source Type: research
The case offers proof that "SARS-CoV-2 can also infect ocular tissues in addition to the respiratory system," the doctors reported in the Oct. 8 online edition of the journal JAMA Ophthalmology.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
To investigate the relationship between maximal exercise capacity measured before severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and hospitalization due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
Source: Mayo Clinic Proceedings - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
After being epidemic in China, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-COV-2) infection has rapidly spread in many countries as a global pandemic, with the number of affected cases dramatically increasing worldwide on a daily basis. Although the median age of hospitalized patients with confirmed infection is usually more advanced 1, with older age reported to be associated to higher mortality rate 2, physiological adaptations occurring during pregnancy have been claimed to be potentially responsible for a more severe respiratory disease, thus leading to higher rates of maternal and fetal complications 3,4.
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research
Authors: Sinclair G, Johnstone P, Hatiboglu MA Abstract Up until, June 13, 2020,>7,500,000 cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and>400,000 deaths, across 216 countries, have been confirmed by the World Health Organization (WHO). With reference to the two previous beta-CoV outbreaks (SARS-CoV and middle east respiratory syndrome [MERS]), this paper examines the pathophysiological and clinical similarities seen across all three CoVs, with a special interest in the neuroinvasive capability and subsequent consequences for patients with primary or metastatic brain tumors. More wid...
Source: Surgical Neurology International - Category: Neurosurgery Tags: Surg Neurol Int Source Type: research
Steve Lindsay, a public health entomologist at Durham University, is midway through explaining how dogs might play a role in detecting COVID-19 infections when a decidedly less-well trained canine interrupts our conversation. “If you’ll excuse me for a minute, I’ve got a naughty black Labrador out in the back garden doing something it shouldn’t be doing,” Lindsay says. He disappears. I hear barking. He returns accompanied by a chocolate lab. “She’s not as skilled as the detection dogs,” Lindsay says as the pup tries to lick his face. “But it’s really interesting t...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Authors: Xiong R, Zhang L, Li S, Sun Y, Ding M, Wang Y, Zhao Y, Wu Y, Shang W, Jiang X, Shan J, Shen Z, Tong Y, Xu L, Chen Y, Liu Y, Zou G, Lavillete D, Zhao Z, Wang R, Zhu L, Xiao G, Lan K, Li H, Xu K Abstract In the original publication there are few errors in Figure 1. The correct Figure 1 is provided in this correction. PMID: 33029721 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Protein and Cell - Category: Cytology Tags: Protein Cell Source Type: research
Authors: Theoharides TC, Conti P Abstract COVID-19 derives from infection with Coronavirus [severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV-2] and is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to release of a storm of pro-inflammatory cytokines and thrombogenic agents resulting in destruction of the lungs. Many reports indicate that a considerable number of patients who are positive for SARS-CoV-2 are asymptomatic or have mild symptoms. However, increasing evidence suggests that many such patients who either recovered from or had mild symptoms after COVID-19 exhibit diffuse, multiorgan, symptoms months after the...
Source: Journal of Biological Regulators and Homeostatic Agents - Category: Biomedical Science Tags: J Biol Regul Homeost Agents Source Type: research
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