The sleep position you should avoid - it may be raising your risk of Alzheimer's disease

DEMENTIA symptoms include memory loss, difficulty concentrating, and having slower thoughts. But you could be raising your risk of Alzheimer's disease signs by sleeping in a certain way. Should you change your sleep position to protect against dementia?
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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This week’s Psychology Around the Net takes a look at what causes revenge bedtime procrastination (a phenomenon I’m way too familiar with), the psychological toll of rude emails, why “I did by best” is a sorry (pun intended) excuse, and more. Stay well, friends! Don’t Fall Into the Trap of ‘Revenge Bedtime Procrastination’: Ever find yourself staying up late at night, even if you spent the entire day ticking item after item off your to-do list, even if there isn’t really anything else you need to do, and even if all your body wants to do is sleep? It’s called revenge b...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Psychology Around the Net alzheimer's Body Dysmorphic Disorder Boundaries Codependency Eating Disorders Oxytocin Postpartum revenge bedtime procrastination Sleep Source Type: blogs
Dementia is a syndrome and an umbrella term that encompasses Alzheimer, Parkinson and autism diseases. These diseases are by far the most common cause of dementia; therefore this investigation will chiefly include these disorders, with a limited discussion of few other disorders related to dementia. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by the accumulation of cerebral β-amyloid plaques, tau proteins and memory loss; Parkinson by the deterioration of brain cells which regulate the movement of body parts and produce dopamine; and autism by abnormalities of social disorder and difficulty in communicating and fo...
Source: Current Nutrition and Food Science - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Gradual memory loss, cognitive decline, wandering off to unknown places, being unable to dress in the morning: to live with dementia and Alzheimer’s disease might be a heart-wrenching burden for both patients and their loved ones. As the global population ages, and the number of individuals suffering from these conditions rises, digital technologies must step forward and offer some solutions for early detection and disease management. That’s what we examined in detail here, so let’s see the intersections of digital health and Alzheimer’s disease. Have you seen Aurora Borealis? Your mind can pl...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine alzheimer Alzheimer's disease brain cognitive health dementia digital digital health elderly elderly care Healthcare Innovation medical technology Source Type: blogs
There are a number of things that can increase the risk of dementia: age, of course, as well as certain genetic profiles and behaviors such as smoking and drinking. Some of the same things that contribute to heart disease, such as high cholesterol levels and the build up of plaques in the blood vessels, can also boost the chances of developing dementia. And in a large study published in JAMA Internal Medicine conducted in the UK, researchers report another possible factor: a group of drugs known as anticholinergics. These include prescription medications for treating depression, pulmonary disease, and Parkinson’s, as...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Brain Dementia Drugs Source Type: news
It’s funny how people only start thinking about death when either a loved one has passed away, or they’re facing their own imminent mortality. But the time to talk and think about death is not at the end — but throughout your life. Because unbeknownst to you, there is an entire profession aligned against you having a good death. And that is (nearly) the entire profession of doctors. I was listening to “Fresh Air” on NPR yesterday with Terry Gross speaking to bioethicist Tia Powell about having a good death with dementia, among other topics. It made me think of my own dad’s recent death...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Death & Dying Ethics & Morality Family General Grief and Loss Policy and Advocacy Professional Source Type: blogs
Abstract OBJECTIVES: The Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) is used to screen for dementia in many Wisconsin Alzheimer Institute memory care clinics. After observing a pattern of lower scores for immediate memory than for delayed memory (immediate memory
Source: WMJ - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: WMJ Source Type: research
BOSTON (CBS) — A new study from the Mayo Clinic finds that people with sleep apnea may have higher accumulations of a toxic protein associated with Alzheimer’s disease in their brains. People with obstructive sleep apnea stop breathing periodically while sleeping which can cause a variety of health issues. Researchers looked at 288 people over 65 without dementia. Those whose bed partners said they stopped breathing while sleeping had a 4 1/2 percent higher level of tau in their brains than people without witnessed sleep apnea. Tau is a protein that clumps in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s which co...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Alzheimer’s Dr. Mallika Marshall Local TV Sleep Apnea Source Type: news
This article describes the epidemiology, genetic and environmental risk factors, clinical diagnosis, biomarkers, and treatment of late-onset AD, defined by age of onset of 65 years or older. RECENT FINDINGS An estimated 5.7 million Americans are living with AD dementia, with the number of affected individuals growing rapidly because of an aging population. Vascular risk factors, sleep disorders, and traumatic brain injury are associated with an increased risk of AD, while increased cognitive and physical activity throughout the lifespan reduce the risk of disease. The primary genetic risk factor for late-onset AD is the...
Source: CONTINUUM: Lifelong Learning in Neurology - Category: Neurology Tags: REVIEW ARTICLES Source Type: research
AbstractDementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is a complex disease that involves a variety of cognitive, behavioral and neurological symptoms, including progressive memory loss, visual hallucinations, parkinsonism, cognitive fluctuations and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD). These symptoms may appear in varying combinations and levels of severity in each patient who is seen in the clinic, making diagnosis and treatment a challenge. DLB is the third most common of all the neurodegenerative diseases behind both Alzheimer ’s disease and Parkinson’s disease (PD). The median age of onset for DLB (76.3 ...
Source: Drugs and Aging - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
This study is part of a growing body of research that suggests a sleep-deprived brain might be more vulnerable to Alzheimer’s disease. Animal studies have shown levels of plaque-forming A-beta plummet during sleep. Other research points to the fact that a sleeping brain runs the “clean cycle” (a reference to a dishwasher) to remove the day’s metabolic debris, specifically A-beta plaques. A study done in 2017 found that even one sleepless night appears to leave behind an excess of the troublesome protein fragment. While this is all impressive research, scientists believe there are still plenty of gap...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Aging Alzheimer's Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Research Sleep Alzheimer's disease Dementia Source Type: blogs
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