Hormone replacement therapy lowers breast cancer risk by 25% in women who have had hysterectomies

A new study, from UCLA Medical Center, women who had had their uteruses removed and were taking HRT had a 25% lower risk of breast cancer than women given a placebo.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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ConclusionOur study contributes to the descriptive prevalence of some known risk factors in Indian breast cancer patients.
Source: The Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology of India - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeLarge-scale population-based registry studies investigating the risk of breast cancer after removal of both ovaries at hysterectomy for benign conditions in women with no known genetic predisposition to cancer are needed. We aimed to perform such a study taking into account the age at surgery status and use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT).MethodsWithin the female population of Denmark born 1937 –1996, we evaluated breast cancer incidence after unilateral or bilateral oophorectomy concomitant with or after benign hysterectomy in comparison with no surgery and with hysterectomy alone using health re...
Source: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Currently, there is insufficient high-quality evidence to inform women considering HRT after treatment for endometrial cancer. The available evidence (both the single RCT and non-randomised evidence) does not suggest significant harm, if HRT is used after surgical treatment for early-stage endometrial cancer. There is no information available regarding use of HRT in higher-stage endometrial cancer (FIGO stage II and above). The use of HRT after endometrial cancer treatment should be individualised, taking account of the woman's symptoms and preferences, and the uncertainty of evidence for and against HRT use. ...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
The pendulum has swung from one extreme to the other when it comes to hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to treat symptoms of menopause. At first, the replacement hormones—mostly a combination of estrogen and progestin to replace what the body stops making after menopause—were seen as a panacea. Doctors thought they could not only relieve hot flashes and night sweats, but also prevent chronic aging diseases like heart problems and weakening bones. But studies then found that the supplement hormones could lead to a higher risk of breast cancer—and that they didn’t protect the heart after all. In the l...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Drugs estrogen Hormone Therapy hormones for menopause hot flashes night sweats progestin Reproductive Health treating menopause Source Type: news
Background: Studies have demonstrated that use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in post-menopausal women results in increased breast density. This is associated with increased risk of breast cancer and reduced sensitivity of mammography. The purpose of the present study was to compare breast densities of women following surgical menopause with and without use of HRT to women who had natural menopause without use of HRT.Methods: Our institutional Database was queried for post-menopausal women newly diagnosed with breast cancer from 01/2010 to 01/2016. Patients were divided into following groups: 1) natural menopause wit...
Source: Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Poster Session Abstracts Source Type: research
Background: Studies have demonstrated that use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in post-menopausal women results in increased breast density. This is associated with increased risk of breast cancer and reduced sensitivity of mammography. The purpose of the present study was to compare breast densities of women following surgical menopause with and without use of HRT to women who had natural menopause without use of HRT.Methods: Our institutional Database was queried for post-menopausal women newly diagnosed with breast cancer from 01/2010 to 01/2016. Patients were divided into following groups: 1) natural menopause wit...
Source: Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Poster Session Abstracts Source Type: research
Conclusion This study shows a link between the use of combined oestrogen and progesterone HRT and breast cancer risk, particularly among women who take the pill for a long period of time. But this is not the entire story. The study included a large cohort of women. The risk increase for combined HRT is based on only 52 of the 39,183 women taking the combined pill who developed breast cancer. Of these, only seven women had been taking the pill for more than 15 years. Therefore, the analysis was based on a very small number, which may mean the risk associations are not completely accurate....
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Medication Older people Source Type: news
CONCLUSION: The prevalence of FSD and HSDD after RRSO was 74% and 73% respectively. Relationship satisfaction, low bodily pain and use of topical vaginal estrogen were associated with a lower likelihood of sexual dysfunction. There was no correlation between serum testosterone or FAI, and sexual dysfunction. PMID: 26545955 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Gynecologic Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Gynecol Oncol Source Type: research
Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has been associated with increased risks of cancers of the breast, ovary, endometrium and colon. The exact mechanism underlying these associations remains unknown, though changes to DNA methylation have been suggested to play a role. To explore this compelling mechanism, we examined genome-wide DNA methylation in blood among 92 women with and without a history of long-term HRT use that were recruited as controls for a previous case-control study of breast cancer. HRT exposure was defined as estrogen use for at least 10 years among women with hysterectomy (n = 23) and as estrogen and proges...
Source: Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Epidemiology Source Type: research
Conclusion: Our study suggests that breastfeeding decreases the risk of recurrence of breast cancer, while OCP usage increases the risk of recurrence of breast cancer. Further studies are needed to validate our results.canres;75/15_Supplement/860/table1T1Predictors of recurrence of breast cancer (rBC)Variablesβ EstimateAdjusted OR (CI)p-valueAge0.0221.02 (1.008-1.03)0.002Breastfed (BF, none vs.>3 children)1.062.9 (1.7-4.9) 3 children)0.742.09 (1.2-3.5)0.006Oral Contraceptive use (OCP, no vs. yes)-0.7430.47 (0.32-0.69)0.0001Radiation exposure (RE, no vs. yes)-1.310.26 (0.16- 0.13)
Source: Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Epidemiology Source Type: research
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