The Impact of Quarantine and Physical Distancing Following COVID-19 on Mental Health: Study Protocol of a Multicentric Italian Population Trial

The COVID-19 pandemic and its related containment measures—mainly physical distancing and isolation—are having detrimental consequences on the mental health of the general population worldwide. In particular, frustration, loneliness, and worries about the future are common reactions and represent well-known risk factors for several mental disorders, including anxiety, affective, and post-traumatic stress disorders. The vast majority of available studies have been conducted in China, where the pandemic started. Italy has been severely hit by the pandemic, and the socio-cultural context is completely different from Eastern countries. Therefore, there is the need for methodologically rigorous studies aiming to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 and quarantine measures on the mental health of the Italian population. In fact, our results will help us to develop appropriate interventions for managing the psychosocial consequences of pandemic. The “COVID-IT-mental health trial” is a no-profit, not-funded, national, multicentric, cross-sectional population-based trial which has the following aims: a) to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 pandemic and its containment measures on mental health of the Italian population; b) to identify the main areas to be targeted by supportive long-term interventions for the different categories of people exposed to the pandemic. Data will be collected through a web-platform using validated assessment tools. Participants will be subd...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

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Cancer patients are a population at high risk of contracting COVID-19 and, also of developing severe complications due to the infection, which is especially true when they are undergoing immunosuppressive treatment. Despite this, they had still to go to hospital to receive chemotherapy during lockdown. In this context, we have evaluated the psychological status of onco-hematological outpatients receiving infusion and not deferrable anti-neoplastic treatment for lymphoproliferative neoplasms, with the aim of both measuring the levels of post-traumatic symptoms, depression, and anxiety during the pandemic and also of investi...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Behavioral Health Mental Health Source Type: blogs
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Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety Ari Shechter coping behaviors COVID-19 frontline responders health care workers stress Source Type: research
  What is the link between addiction and mental illness? Is addiction a choice? In today’s Not Crazy podcast, Gabe and Lisa discuss whether addiction should be classified as a disease and whether or not it should require medical treatment. Gabe also shares his personal story of addiction and how it tied in with his bipolar disorder. What’s your take? Tune in for an in-depth discussion which covers every angle of this often controversial topic. (Transcript Available Below) Please Subscribe to Our Show: And We Love Written Reviews!  About The Not Crazy podcast Hosts Gabe Howard is an award-winning...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction General Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Recovery Source Type: blogs
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Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Stress Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Mental Health and Disorders Emotions Disasters and Emergencies Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Psychiatry and Psychiatrists Depression (Mental) Loneliness Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Antidepressant Source Type: news
Some health officials have forecast a steep rise in new mental health disorders. Others say the impact isn ’t likely to last.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Stress Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Mental Health and Disorders Emotions Disasters and Emergencies Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Psychiatry and Psychiatrists Depression (Mental) Loneliness Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Antidepressant Source Type: news
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Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
Authors: Javelot H, Weiner L Abstract Although the "panic" word has been abundantly linked to the SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) pandemic in the press, in the scientific literature very few studies have considered whether the current epidemic could predispose to the onset or the aggravation of panic attacks or panic disorder. Indeed, most studies thus far have focused on the risk of increase and aggravation of other psychiatric disorders as a consequence of the SARS-CoV-2 epidemic, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and general...
Source: L Encephale - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Encephale Source Type: research
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic General Habits Happiness Alcohol Use Authenticity Career Change coronavirus COVID-19 Habit Change Marriage Personal Growth social distancing teletherapy Source Type: blogs
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Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: depression featured health and fitness psychology reading self education self-improvement covid covid_19 mental health pickthebrain Source Type: blogs
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