Dilemma for doctors as Roche ’s Covid drug is ‘life-saver’ but too costly

In India, the drug sold under the brand name Actemra, is approved for the use in autoimmune disease such as rheumatoid arthritis and for six months treatment it costs Rs 2.5 lakh. For Covid-19 patients who are administered this drug, the cost is Rs 60,000 per dosage.
Source: The Economic Times - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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ConclusionsLack of availability of sound scientific knowledge inevitably lead unreliable news to spread over the population, preventing people to disentangle them form reliable information. Even if additional studies are needed to replicate and strengthen our results, these findings represent initial evidence to derive recommendations based on actual data for subjects with autoimmune diseases.
Source: Autoimmunity Highlights - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
AbstractThe outbreak of coronavirus in the world has led to an uncertainty about treatment of patients with autoimmune disorders because of their weakened immune system coupled with immunosuppressive agents they take which predisposes them to a host of infections. Data on COVID-19 patients with underlying rheumatological diseases has been emerging mostly in the form of small case series and one global registry. From these data, it seems like our patients, although immunosuppressed, are not particularly susceptible to the coronavirus infection and if infected, do not have significantly worse outcomes than other patients. In...
Source: Clinical Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
We report that electrical stimulation (ES) stimulation of post-stroke aged rats led to an improved functional recovery of spatial long-term memory (T-maze), but not on the rotating pole or the inclined plane, both tests requiring complex sensorimotor skills. Surprisingly, ES had a detrimental effect on the asymmetric sensorimotor deficit. Histologically, there was a robust increase in the number of doublecortin-positive cells in the dentate gyrus and SVZ of the infarcted hemisphere and the presence of a considerable number of neurons expressing tubulin beta III in the infarcted area. Among the genes that were unique...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Authors: Manfredi A, Luppi F, Cassone G, Vacchi C, Salvarani C, Sebastiani M Abstract INTRODUCTION: Main clinical manifestations of SARS-CoV-2 infection are characterized by fever, cough, dyspnoea and interstitial pneumonia frequently evolving in an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). AREAS COVERED: Features of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia presents some common points with interstitial lung disease (ILD) both idiopathic and related to rheumatoid arthritis (RA), typically characterized by a chronic progression over some years and possibly complicated by acute exacerbation. The study of so...
Source: Expert Review of Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Expert Rev Clin Immunol Source Type: research
Abstract Although most autoimmune diseases are considered to be CD4 T-cell or antibody-mediated, many respond to CD20-depleting antibodies that have limited influence on CD4 and plasma cells. This includes rituximab, oblinutuzumab, ofatumumab that are used in cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and off-label in a large number of other autoimmunities, and ocrelizumab in multiple sclerosis. Recently, the COVID-19 pandemic created concerns about immunosuppression in autoimmunity, leading to cessation or a delay in immunotherapy treatments. However, based on the known and emerging biology of autoimmunity and COVID-19, it was...
Source: Clinical and Developmental Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Clin Exp Immunol Source Type: research
Abstract Chloroquine (CQ) and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) are derivatives of the heterocyclic aromatic compound quinoline. These economical compounds were used as antimalarial agents for many years. Currently, they are used as monotherapy or in conjunction with other therapies for the treatment of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Sjögren's syndrome (SS) and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS). Based on its effects on the modulation of the autophagy process, various clinical studies suggest that CQ and HCQ could be used in combination with other chemo...
Source: Current Pharmaceutical Design - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Pharm Des Source Type: research
A man who was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) five years ago sees his rheumatologist for a follow-up visit. Fortunately, his arthritis is well controlled through medication. He can walk and do all his daily activities without pain. But over the past six months, he’s been feeling short of breath when climbing stairs. He has an annoying dry cough, too. COVID-19? That’s ruled out quickly. But a CT scan of his chest reveals early fibrosis (scarring) of the lungs, most likely related to rheumatoid arthritis. “I can finally walk normally, and now I can’t breathe when I walk!” says the frust...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Arthritis Autoimmune diseases Health Inflammation Lung disease Source Type: blogs
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced today that it is revoking the emergency use authorization for hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine, citing a lack of evidence that these drugs are effective for COVID-19. Early on in the pandemic, doctors scrambling to find a way to treat the disease widely prescribed hydroxychloroquine to their sickest patients, based on thin evidence from a handful of relatively weak studies. However, recent research has made it increasingly clear that the drug is likely ineffective against the disease, and that it carries a risk of significant side effects, including heart problems. ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced today that it is revoking the emergency use authorization for hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine, citing a lack of evidence that these drugs are effective for COVID-19. Early on in the pandemic, doctors scrambling to find a way to treat the disease widely prescribed hydroxychloroquine to their sickest patients, based on thin evidence from a handful of relatively weak studies. However, recent research has made it increasingly clear that the drug is likely ineffective against the disease, and that it carries a risk of significant side effects, including heart problems. ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 incidence seems to be similar in our cohort compared to the general population. Adherence to therapy and to social distancing advise was high. PMID: 32527675 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Autoimmunity - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: J Autoimmun Source Type: research
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