Siblings Who Are More Concerned About Their Inheritance Than Parents' Care

Photo credit Uriel Soberanes Some adult children work seamlessly together to find the best care solutions for their aging parents. However, some siblings don’t contribute at all, leaving the heavy lifting, sacrifices and difficult choices up to one adult child, often a daughter. Still others are involved sporadically, only deigning to give their opinions when pricey care decisions are on the line. In the latter scenario, these siblings disprove of respite, are suspicious of outside caregivers and demand to keep their parents’ bills low.  Continue reading on Agingcare for more on siblings who may be more interested in protecting inheritance than in parents' care: Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook  *Incontinence issues? Try Egosan premium underwear for discrete, dignified protection. In an effort to support both existing and new customers, Egosan has a new promo code for the purchase of any Egosan product when checking out on Amazon.  Use promo Code: 20ELDERS and SAVE 20% OFF your entire first order.                Related StoriesCommunicating with Your Older Parents So They Actually Hear YouGrandma Refuses To Wear Hearing Aids Frustrates FamilyIn What Way Does Food Affect Incontinence? 
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs

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Abstract Neonatal tumors occur infrequently; sacrococcygeal teratoma (SCT) is a rare and abnormal mass often diagnosed on antenatal ultrasound. An SCT may cause serious antenatal complications, requires surgery in the neonatal period, and can lead to various long-term sequelae including fecal incontinence or constipation, urinary incontinence, and lower extremity mobility impairment. Even rarer are SCTs that include intraspinal extension necessitating complex neurosurgical intervention to relieve possible spinal cord compression or tumor tissue resection. A comprehensive understanding of the natural history of SCT...
Source: Neonatal Network - Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Tags: Neonatal Netw Source Type: research
Conditions:   Pelvic Organ Prolapse;   Stress Urinary Incontinence;   Overactive Bladder Interventions:   Behavioral: Pelvic organ prolapse decision aid;   Behavioral: Stress urinary incontinence decision aid;   Behavioral: Overactive bladder decision aid Sponsor:   Massachusetts General Hospital Completed
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
By the time Janet Johnson’s father reached his mid-80s, he was on so many medications their names are now impossible to recall. There were pills for managing his cholesterol, blood pressure, and asthma, says Johnson, an administrative assistant who lives near Minneapolis. Other drugs helped with his sleep problems and treated his type 2 diabetes. There were more, too, but who can remember? One thing was certain though: As the number of prescriptions increased, his health seemed to get worse. “As he aged, he fell often and was confused. It was awful,” Johnson remembers. Continue reading on HealthCentral fo...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
Dear Candid Caregiver: My parents are both in their late 70s and doing quite well but I see that the need for making decisions about their futures, or at least gathering information, is closing in. We live in the same community, so my husband and I have been helping with some minor things around their home, but they are very independent and hire out the most difficult jobs. However, with time, I know that more help from us will be necessary. When do I consider myself their caregiver? How do I begin? What do I need to know? – Potential Newbie Continue reading on HealthCentral to learn more about how you, as a new...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
Dear Candid Caregiver: My 79-year-old mom has been widowed for a little over a year. She’d always depended on Dad to help her because her arthritis limited her movement and she uses a walker much of the time. Now, though, there’s been a complete change in attitude, and she insists that she can take care of everything herself, even physical tasks that are clearly a challenge. I’m not certain whether she’s trying to prove something or if it has something to do with Dad’s death. Whatever her reasoning, I worry about her. I can’t be with her all the time, so I want to help make her...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
Photo credit William Krause Dear Carol: My 93-year-old grandma has hearing aids, but she refuses to wear them. Her hearing without them is poor, and while she's taught herself to read lips, that only works if I'm standing right in front of her. My husband's so frustrated that he stood in front of her the other morning and said, “I am not going to talk to you until you put your hearing aids in your ears.” I understand his frustration, but his response doesn't seem right either. Could there be some logical reason why Grandma won't wear her hearing aids? — WS. Continue reading on Inforum to learn more a...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
Source: International Urogynecology Journal - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Source: International Urogynecology Journal - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate associations among use of walking aids, mobility status, and occurrence of urinary incontinence (UI) in geriatric patients residing in nursing homes, and to examine associations between UI severity (frequency and amount) and its impact on health-related quality of life (QoL). DESIGN: Multicenter descriptive cross-sectional prevalence study. SUBJECTS AND SETTING: A total of 2044 patients from nursing homes were included in the study. A majority were female (72.0%), the mean age of participants was 82.1 years (SD 11.2), their mean body mass index was 26.1 (SD 5.4), a...
Source: Journal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing - Category: Nursing Tags: Continence Care Source Type: research
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