DWI-MRI can solve pediatric arthritis with no contrast

Diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI-MRI) has proven accuracy in diagnosing and...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: DWI-MRI predicts stroke recurrence in low-risk patients AI can differentiate parkinsonism on DWI-MRI DWI helps predict breast cancer cases with metastasis DWI-MRI may be best for indeterminate lung nodules Novel MRI scanner fits extremity imaging like a glove
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news

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Overkill: When Modern Medicine Goes Too Far by Paul Offit M.D.I am admittedly a huge fanboy of Paul Offit, an infectious disease guru at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, one of the preeminent pediatric hospitals in the world. His latest bookOverall: When Modern Medicine Goes Too Far, is a collection of medical facts that are already known to the well-read individual, but fly in the face of wrongly-held, out-dated, commonly-believed medical concepts. The majority of the incorrect information was previously considered the standard of care, but newer and better science and studies have clearly demonstrated ...
Source: A Pediatrician's Blog - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: blogs
AbstractPurposeWe sought to examine associations of mammography utilization with comorbidities and functional limitations in older breast cancer survivors.MethodsFemale breast cancer survivors (N = 1064) identified in the 2016 and 2018 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) who were aged ≥ 65 years were included for this study. Mammography use, major comorbidities (diabetes mellitus, myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary di sease, arthritis, chronic kidney disease, depression, and malignancy other than breast cancer), functional limitat...
Source: Journal of Cancer Survivorship - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
By MICHEL ACCAD Last month marked the 400th anniversary of the birth of John Graunt, commonly regarded as the father of epidemiology.  His major published work, Natural and Political Observations Made upon the Bills of Mortality, called attention to the death statistics published weekly in London beginning in the late 16th century.  Graunt was skeptical of how causes of death were ascribed, especially in times of plagues.  Evidently, 400 years of scientific advances have done little to lessen his doubts!  A few days ago, Fox News reported that Colorado governor Jared Polis ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Medical Practice Physicians Diagnosis MICHEL ACCAD Source Type: blogs
Among the many remarkable things that have happened since the COVID-19 pandemic began is that a lot of our usual medical care has simply stopped. According to a recent study, routine testing for cervical cancer, cholesterol, and blood sugar is down nearly 70% across the country. Elective surgeries, routine physical examinations, and other screening tests have been canceled or rescheduled so that people can stay at home, avoid being around others who might be sick, and avoid unknowingly spreading the virus. Many clinics, hospitals, and doctors’ offices have been closed for weeks except for emergencies. Even if these f...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Health care Healthy Aging Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
We report a 58-year-old woman who suddenly developed brain infarction with weakness of the left lower extremity and left perioral dysesthesia during postoperative tamoxifen therapy for breast cancer and prednisolone therapy for rheumatoid arthritis. Diffusion-weighted images detected multiple areas of hyperintensity in the posterior circulation system of the brain. Despite extensive examinations, we could not identify any embolic sources except hypoplasia of the right vertebral artery. We found decreased activity of protein C against its antigen level (activity: 59% versus antigen: 122%) with enhanced activity of coagulati...
Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Case Report Source Type: research
In conclusion, this study suggests that epigenetic age acceleration is significantly associated with lung function in women older than 50 years. We hypothesised that this could be due to menopause. However, we have observed that menopause has minimal effect and therefore there is possibility of other unknown physiological factors at older age in females mediating the epigenetic age acceleration effect on lung function. While, it is still unknown what exactly epigenetic aging from DNA methylation measures, this study suggests it can be utilised as one of the important factors to assess women's lung health in old age. DNA me...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Undergoing earlier menopause is a sign of a greater burden of age-related damage and dysfunction, so it should not be surprising to see that this correlates with a greater incidence of chronic disease in the years thereafter. People with a greater burden of cell and tissue damage tend to exhibit all of the manifestations of aging earlier than their less damaged peers. These variations in damage burden and consequences from individual to individual are near all the results of lifestyle choices, particularly smoking, weight, and exercise, and environmental factors such as exposure to chronic viral infection. Genetics plays o...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
Conclusions and Perspectives In this review, we have discussed important milestones from the early description of “Serum-sickness” as being due to antibodies directed against Neu5Gc epitopes all the way to the present-day therapeutic implications of these antibodies in cancer therapy. Some of these milestones have been represented in a concise timeline (Figure 6). While the “Xenosialitis” hypothesis is well-supported in the human-like mouse models, it has yet to be conclusively proven in humans. It remains to be seen if “Xenosialitis” plays a role in other uniquely-human diseases. FI...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Lilly Rocha was 37 years old in 2008 when she began having strange symptoms. When people asked her questions, she knew the answers but couldn’t articulate them. A tingling sensation on her left breast became painful. She thought she might have breast cancer, but her doctor assured her she was just experiencing stress from her demanding job. Her symptoms continued to get worse, and doctors continued to dismiss her. Three months later, at work, she became seriously ill. Luckily, her boss recognized the symptoms—chest and jaw pain and numbness in her left hand—and drove her to the nearest emergency room, whe...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized heart health Source Type: news
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