New Developments in Non-allergen-specific Therapy for the Treatment of Food Allergy

AbstractPurpose of ReviewThe prevalence of food allergy is increasing. At the current time, there are no approved treatments for food allergy. Major limitations of immunotherapy are long treatment periods (months or years), frequent clinic visits, high costs, increased risk of adverse events during treatment, and lack of durability of desensitization. Additionally, it is allergen-specific, and in those allergic to multiple allergens, the length and cost of treatment are further increased. In this review, we summarize recent developments in novel non-allergen-specific treatments for food allergy.Recent FindingsA number of monoclonal antibodies that block IgE or specific pro-allergenic cytokines or their receptors have shown promise in clinical trials for food allergy.SummaryThe insight we have gained through the use of one drug for the treatment of an atopic disease is quickly being translated to other atopic diseases, including food allergy. The future for food allergy treatment with biologics looks bright.
Source: Current Allergy and Asthma Reports - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research

Related Links:

This article provides highlights of the clinically impactful original studies and reviews published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice in 2019 on the subjects of anaphylaxis, asthma, dermatitis, drug allergy, food allergy, immunodeficiency, immunotherapy, rhinitis/sinusitis, and urticaria/angioedema/mast cell disorders. Within each topic, practical aspects of diagnosis and management are emphasized. Treatments discussed include lifestyle modifications, allergen avoidance therapy, positive and negative effects of pharmacologic therapy, and various forms of immunologic and desensitization manageme...
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Data are emerging to confirm our clinical experience that many food-allergic patients experience stereotypical symptoms following allergen exposure, both in the community and at supervised oral food challenge, in a manner that varies from one patient to another. Integrating datasets from different cohorts and applying unbiased machine-learning analyses may demonstrate specific food allergy endotypes, in a similar way to asthma. Whether this results in improvements in patient management (e.g. through facilitating risk stratification or impacting on the decision to prescribe EAI and, perhaps, the number of device...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewInvestigational allergen immunotherapies (AITs) including oral immunotherapy (OIT), sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT), and epicutaneous immunotherapy (EPIT) have proven to increase allergen thresholds required to elicit an allergic reaction in a majority of subjects. However, these studies lack consistent biomarkers to predict therapy outcomes. Here, we will review biomarkers that are currently being investigated for AIT.Recent FindingsThe mechanisms underlying the therapeutic benefit of AIT involve various cell types, including mast cells, basophils, T cells, and B cells. Skin prick and basophil act...
Source: Current Allergy and Asthma Reports - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Peanut allergy affects 1-2% of individuals in the United States, and is increasing in prevalence.1-4 Although there is accumulating data on immunotherapy for peanut allergy,5-8 the cornerstone of management remains strict avoidance of peanut protein, maintenance of an emergency action plan and prompt use of epinephrine to treat systemic reactions in case of an accidental exposure, which occurs in up to 12-15% of peanut-allergic individuals annually.9,10 Peanut allergy significantly impacts quality of life,11 as it is typically lifelong, is the leading cause of food-induced anaphylaxis in children, and the leading cause of ...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewOver the last decade, there has been a spark in innovation in the development of therapies for food allergy. Herein, we describe the background and recent advances for food-specific immunotherapies including epicutaneous (EPIT), sublingual (SLIT), and subcutaneous (SCIT).Recent FindingsStudies have progressed most quickly for the treatment of peanut allergy. Data from the phase 3 EPIT trial add to the accumulating evidence that this will be a viable therapy for peanut allergy. Studies for SLIT and SCIT remain in earlier phases with promising results.SummaryThis is an exciting era for the treatment ...
Source: Current Allergy and Asthma Reports - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS Identifying allergens is important for the diagnosis and management of allergic disorders, and for performing immunotherapy. PMID: 31676746 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Medical Science Monitor - Category: Research Tags: Med Sci Monit Source Type: research
For children with peanut allergy (PA) and their families, living with the possibility of a potentially life-threatening reaction can decrease health-related quality of life (HRQL). Reducing the risk of reactions due to accidental ingestion through immunotherapy may improve HRQL. In a Phase IIb trial, daily epicutaneous immunotherapy (EPIT) with 250- μg peanut patch (∼1/1000 of 1 peanut kernel) resulted in significant treatment response versus placebo. Objectives of this qualitative, multisite, retrospective study were to assess patients’ HRQL, treatment expectations, and satisfaction.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Food Allergy Source Type: research
Pollen food allergy syndrome (PFAS) is widely prevalent, affecting 5 percent of the population(1). Subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy (SCIT) has been shown to be effective in reducing PFAS symptoms in adults(2). However, this effect has not been widely demonstrated in a pediatric population, which this study will examine.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
This study describes a single center’s experience with milk OIT, which may be informative to practicing allergists.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
The prevalence of food allergies (FA) is increasing. Oral immunotherapy (OIT) is an emerging FA therapy, but the practice requirements necessary for its implementation are unclear. We investigated patterns of effective clinical practice logistics for implementing OIT compared to subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) among allergists/immunologists who prescribe both treatments.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
More News: Allergy | Allergy & Immunology | Asthma | Clinical Trials | Food Allergy | Immunotherapy