New Coronavirus May be Cause of Outbreak in China

Some coronaviruses can cause colds, while others can trigger severe respiratory diseases such as SARS and MERS, the AP reported.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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On Tuesday, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared an official name for the new coronavirus disease: COVID-19 — making sure not to reference Wuhan, the central Chinese city where the virus originated. COVID-19 stands for Corona Virus Disease 19. “Having a name matters to prevent the use of other names that can be inaccurate or stigmatizing,” said Director-General of the WHO, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. “It also gives us a standard format to use for any future coronavirus outbreaks.” The WHO referenced guidelines set in 2015 that ensure the name does not refer to a geographical location, ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 onetime Source Type: news
By Dr. Lisa Stone, Epidemiology Adviser ; Robert Salerno, Director, Global Health Security Publio Gonzalez, a biologist with the Gorgas Institute, holds a bat in Meteti, Panama, June 6, 2018, as part an Emerging Infectious Diseases Training Event (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dustin Mullen).February 11, 2020A disease spillover event, when a virus moves from animal to human hosts, can cause significant human illness. The coronavirus (COVID-19) seems to have spilled over sometime in late 2019, at a wildlife market in Wuhan, China, leading to more than 40,000 confirmed cases and at least 910 reported deaths&nbs...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Infectious Diseases Global Health Security Source Type: news
Authors: Malik YS, Sircar S, Bhat S, Sharun K, Dhama K, Dadar M, Tiwari R, Chaicumpa W Abstract Coronaviruses are the well-known cause of severe respiratory, enteric and systemic infections in a wide range of hosts including man, mammals, fish, and avian. The scientific interest on coronaviruses increased after the emergence of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) outbreaks in 2002-2003 followed by Middle East Respiratory Syndrome CoV (MERS-CoV). This decade's first CoV, named 2019-nCoV, emerged from Wuhan, China, and declared as "Public Health Emergency of International Concern" on Ja...
Source: Veterinary Quarterly - Category: Veterinary Research Tags: Vet Q Source Type: research
The world ’s most trafficked mammal may be involved in the Wuhan outbreak, but the evidence is far from clear.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Pangolins MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome) SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) bioRxiv Baylor College of Medicine EcoHealth Alliance Texas A & m University Xinhua Wuhan (China) your-feed-science Source Type: news
It's no coincidence that some of the worst viral disease outbreaks in recent years - SARS, MERS, Ebola, Marburg and likely the newly arrived 2019-nCoV virus - originated in bats. A new University of California, Berkeley, study finds that bats' fierce immune response to viruses could drive viruses to replicate faster, so that when they jump to mammals with average immune systems, such as humans, the viruses wreak deadly havoc.
Source: World Pharma News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news
Pandemics are perversely democratic. They’re nasty, lethal and sneaky, but they don’t discriminate. No matter your age, ethnicity, religion, gender, or nation, you’re a part of the pathogenic constituency. That shared vulnerability, and the resulting human collectivism—a universal response to a universal threat—is newly and vividly evident in the face of the now-global outbreak of the novel coronavirus known as 2019-nCoV. As of writing, there have been over 30,000 diagnosed cases and over 630 related deaths. A virus that emerged in a single city, Wuhan, China—indeed, in a single crowded ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV Infectious Disease Source Type: news
The new human coronavirus responsible for the current outbreak is closely related to two bat-derived coronaviruses and distinct from the coronaviruses responsible for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), researchers report.Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - Category: Intensive Care Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 6 February 2020Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): Günter Kampf, Daniel Todt, Stephanie Pfaender, Eike SteinmannSummaryCurrently, the emergence of a novel human coronavirus, temporary named 2019-nCoV, has become a global health concern causing severe respiratory tract infections in humans. Human-to-human transmissions have been described with incubation times between 2-10 days, facilitating its spread via droplets, contaminated hands or surfaces. We therefore reviewed the literature on all available information about the persistence of human and veterinary coronaviruses o...
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
So far, very few young children seem to be falling ill. The pattern was seen in outbreaks of SARS and MERS, too.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) Epidemics MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome) Children and Childhood Deaths (Fatalities) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention China Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 4 February 2020Source: Microbes and InfectionAuthor(s): Jieliang ChenAbstractA zoonotic coronavirus, labeled as 2019-nCoV by The World Health Organization (WHO), has been identified as the causative agent of the viral pneumonia outbreak in Wuhan, China, at the end of 2019. Although 2019-nCoV can cause a severe respiratory illness like SARS and MERS, evidence from clinics suggested that 2019-nCoV is generally less pathogenic than SARS-CoV, and much less than MERS-CoV. The transmissibility of 2019-nCoV is still debated and needs to be further assessed. To avoid the 2019-nCoV outbreak turnin...
Source: Microbes and Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
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