Central Drive to the Paretic Ankle Plantarflexors Affects the Relationship Between Propulsion and Walking Speed After Stroke.

This study sought to elucidate the relationship between the neuromuscular function of the paretic plantarflexor muscles and propulsion deficits across individuals with different walking speeds. METHODS: For 40 individuals poststroke, we used instrumented gait analysis and dynamometry coupled with supramaximal electrostimulation to study the interplay between limb kinematics, the neuromuscular function of the paretic plantarflexors (ie, strength capacity and central drive), propulsion, and walking speed. RESULTS: The strength capacity of the paretic plantarflexors was not independently related to paretic propulsion. Reduced central drive to the paretic plantarflexors independently contributed to paretic propulsion deficits. An interaction between walking speed and plantarflexor central drive was observed. Individuals with slower speeds and lower paretic plantarflexor central drive presented with the largest propulsion impairments. Some study participants with low paretic plantarflexor central drive presented with similarly fast speeds as those with near-normal central drive by leveraging a compensatory reliance on nonparetic propulsion. The final model accounted for 86% of the variance in paretic propulsion (R = 0.86, F = 33.10, P
Source: Physical Therapy - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Tags: J Neurol Phys Ther Source Type: research

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Abstract BACKGROUND: Two-thirds of patients with stroke experience only mild impairments in the acute phase, and the proportion of patients
Source: Physical Therapy - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Tags: Phys Ther Source Type: research
The 53rd edition of the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) is officially underway! With over  4,400 exhibiting companies from industries ranging from gaming to digital health showcasing their latest products and technologies, you might need some assistance to stay afloat in the flood of new announcements. Donning our rescue caps, The Medical Futurist team is coming to your aid! We’ve compiled the most exciting (and questionable) CES news relating to digital health that we’ve found at this year’s show. Let’s take a look! The Wows Every year at CES, companies come up with promising technologie...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine ces digital health Healthcare technology digital technology digital health companies digital health tech Source Type: blogs
Did you ever wonder why medical research seems to flip-flop so often? Eggs used to be terrible for your health; now they’re not so bad. Stomach ulcers were thought to be due to stress and a “type A personality” but that’s been disproven. I was taught that every postmenopausal woman should take hormone replacement therapy to prevent heart disease and bone loss; now it’s considered way too risky. It can make you question every bit of medical news you hear. But maybe that’s not such a bad thing. Questioning what you read or hear is reasonable. And maybe medical reversals — when new re...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Medical Research Prevention Tests and procedures Source Type: blogs
Abstract Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT) is comprised of a set of techniques shown to produce significant changes in upper extremity (UE) function following stroke and other disorders. The significant positive results obtained with the UE protocol has led to the development of LE-CIMT, an intervention to improve lower extremity (LE) function. However, some modifications of the UE protocol were needed including: omitting use of a restraint device, development of supervised motor training tasks to emphasize movement of the lower limb, and adaptation of the UE Motor Activity Log (MAL) for the lower-extremi...
Source: Physical Therapy - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Tags: Phys Ther Source Type: research
Abstract Background: In 2018, the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) published a clinical guideline for adults with neurological conditions, which included recommendations for the Five-Repetition Sit-to-Stand test (5STSt). According to the APTA, a standard-height chair should be used, but there is no recommendation regarding seat depth. In addition, the APTA recommended the use of one trial of the test, based on expert opinion.Objectives: (1) Compare the 5STSt scores of patients post-stroke and healthy-matched controls using two types of chairs (one standardized and one adjusted to the individual's anthr...
Source: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Tags: Physiother Theory Pract Source Type: research
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To examine the effectiveness of a set of rules for referral and therapy input in a three-tiered physiotherapy program on activities of daily living (ADL), motor function, and quality of life of stroke survivors. DESIGN: Randomized controlled study. SETTING: Rehabilitation departments of 11 teaching hospitals. SUBJECTS: A total of 285 participants with stroke. OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome was ADL independence measured with the Modified Barthel Index (MBI) at weeks 3, 6, 9, 13, and 17. Secondary outcomes were motor function and quality of life measured with Fugel-Meyer As...
Source: Clinical Rehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Tags: Clin Rehabil Source Type: research
ena-Anton Mechanical horse-riding simulators consist of a device that mimics the movement of a real horse, generating between 50 and 100 three-dimensional physical movements (forward and back, left and right, up and down). The main objective of this study is to analyze the effectiveness of mechanical horse-riding simulators to improve postural balance in subjects with neurological disorders. The search was conducted during January–March 2019 in PubMed, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), Cochrane, Web of Science, CINAHL, and Scopus. The methodological quality of the studies was evaluated through the PEDr...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Discussion, “Top 5 Things You Need to Know about the Implantable Internet of Things." Brian Chapman, partner and leader of ZS’s medtech practice of ZS, attributes today’s focus on data to the intersection of two important things: "A general recognition that understanding more and connecting actions with outcomes will provide feedback and understanding that will drive standards of care. This is not new, but as capabilities rise in data collection, aggregation, and synthesize rise, and coupled with machine learning, the promise of data in healthcare is becoming ...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news
Conclusions: The frequency of mobilization reported in this survey is less than proposed by the results of the most recent “A Very Early Rehabilitation Trial” (AVERT) after stroke, phase 3 trial. This study found a positive correlation between increased session frequency and recovery of walking at 3 months, survival, and a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 2 or less. Respondents believe additional mobilization would be beneficial, but report barriers to implementation that include increased PT caseloads and lack of resources. Additional research is required to determine the influence of mobilization timing...
Source: The Journal of Acute Care Physical Therapy - Category: Physiotherapy Tags: Original Study Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy - Video - Category: Physiotherapy Source Type: video
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