Africa: Pregnant Women and Children Under Five Are Still At Grave Risk From Malaria, Says Who's Annual Report

[Malaria Consortium] Malaria Consortium welcomes the latest World Malaria Report, which is published by the World Health Organization today.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news

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In endemic areas, pregnant women are highly susceptible to Plasmodium falciparum malaria characterized by the accumulation of parasitized red blood cells (pRBC) in the placenta. In subsequent pregnancies, women d...
Source: BMC Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
The sensitivity of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malaria is inadequate for detecting low-density, often asymptomatic infections, such as those that can occur when screening pregnant women for malaria. The ...
Source: Malaria Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusions: Pregnant HIV-infected women receiving efavirenz-based antiretroviral therapy during malaria treatment with AL showed reduced exposure to both the artemisinin and lumefantrine. These data suggest that malaria and HIV coinfected pregnant women may require adjustments in AL dosage or treatment duration to achieve exposure comparable with HIV-uninfected pregnant women.
Source: JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Clinical Science Source Type: research
Abstract A key drawback to monitoring the emergence and spread of antimalarial drug resistance in sub-Saharan Africa is early detection and containment. Next-generation sequencing methods offer the resolution, sensitivity and scale required to fill this gap by surveilling for molecular markers of drug resistance. We performed targeted sequencing using molecular inversion probes to interrogate five Plasmodium falciparum genes (pfcrt, pfmdr1, pfdhps, pfdhfr and pfk13) implicated in chloroquine, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) and artemisinin resistance, in two sites in Ghana. A total of 803 dried blood spots were pr...
Source: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Antimicrob Agents Chemother Source Type: research
Authors: Touré AA, Doumbouya A, Diallo A, Loua G, Cissé A, Sidibé S, Beavogui AH Abstract Introduction: Malaria is the leading cause of consultation in Guinea health facilities. During pregnancy, it remains a major health concern causing considerable risks for mother, fetus, and newborn. However, little is known about the epidemiology of malaria among pregnant women in Guinea. We aimed to provide information on malaria-associated factors in parturients. Methods: It was a cross-sectional survey in two regional hospitals and two district hospitals. 1000 parturients and their newborns were sur...
Source: Journal of Tropical Medicine - Category: Tropical Medicine Tags: J Trop Med Source Type: research
Abstract Malaria infection during pregnancy is associated with adverse birth outcomes but underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we discuss the impact of malaria in pregnancy on three pathways that are important regulators of healthy pregnancy outcomes: L-arginine-nitric oxide biogenesis, complement activation, and the heme axis. These pathways are not mutually exclusive, and they collectively create a proinflammatory, antiangiogenic milieu at the maternal-fetal interface that interferes with placental function and development. We hypothesize that targeting these host-response pathways would mitigate t...
Source: Trends in Parasitology - Category: Parasitology Authors: Tags: Trends Parasitol Source Type: research
We examined factors related to the uptake of two malaria prevention measures, insecticide-treated bed-nets and prophylactic sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), among pregnant women in Nnewi, Nigeria. The survey had a quantitative and qualitative part. For each part, the subjects meeting our inclusion criteria were systematically identified in a population-based manner. For the qualitative part, focused group discussions, in-depth interviews with a wide variety of stakeholders (e.g., health workers, males whose wives are pregnant, and drug and net sellers), and key informants including doctors and nurses were held. All data co...
Source: The Scientific World Journal - Category: Science Tags: ScientificWorldJournal Source Type: research
Abstract Artemether-lumefantrine antimalarial efficacy in pregnancy could be compromised by reduced drug exposure. Population-based simulations suggested that therapeutic efficacy would be improved if the treatment duration was increased. We assessed the efficacy, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of an extended 5-day regimen of artemether-lumefantrine compared to the standard 3-day treatment in 48 pregnant women and 48 non-pregnant women with uncomplicated falciparum malaria in an open-label, randomized clinical trial. Babies were assessed at birth, 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. Nonlinear mixed-effects modelling was use...
Source: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Antimicrob Agents Chemother Source Type: research
By Eric Cheung, CNN (CNN) — Scientists say they have made a breakthrough on developing a contraceptive pill that only needs to be taken once a month. The star-shaped capsule could help reduce unintended pregnancies that arise from users forgetting to take their daily dose of the pill, according to a news release from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The capsule is coated with gelatin that can remain in the stomach for weeks after being swallowed, the researchers said. From there, it slowly releases hormones to prevent pregnancy. Tests conducted on pigs showed that the capsule could provide t...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health birth control CNN MIT Source Type: news
Birth control pills are among the most effective ways to prevent pregnancy, but only if women faithfully take them every day. Human nature being what it is, nearly half of women admit to missing a pill at least once every three months, and, as a result, about 9% of women on oral contraception become pregnant every year. That number would almost certainly fall if women only had to remember to take the pill once a month or so. That’s why researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women’s Hospital (with support from the Gates Foundation) are trying to create a once-a-month birth control pill. In a paper published today (...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Birth Control embargoed study Reproductive Health Source Type: news
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