Wednesday ’s Daily Brief: Iraq protests, ‘historic’ Syria talks, Chile pulls out of COP25, Guinea-Bissau, South Sudan, new nuclear watchdog chief

A recap of Wednesday’s stories: new Syria talks begin in Geneva; Chile pulls out as host of major climate conference; UN calls for national talks to break cycle of violence in Iraq; UN chief voices ‘serious concern’ over Guinea-Bissau political crisis; IOM suspends South Sudan Ebola screening; UN atomic watchdog appoints new leader.  
Source: UN News Centre - Women, Children, Population - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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The DRC ’s Ebola epidemic will be declared over on 12 April but there’s little time to celebrate as the country pivots towards tackling the coronavirus
Source: New Scientist - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research
No new cases have been reported in the ongoing Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo since 17 February 2020 (Figure 1).
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: news Source Type: news
Dr.Tracey McNamara on West Nile Fever and COVID-19   As interviewed by Edward Borton, GIDEON What was the experience of discovering a new virus outbreak on your doorstep? When New York City announced that people were dying of unusual encephalitis, I was struck by the timing and proximity between this event and an outbreak of crow deaths. Upon ruling out all known viruses that cause inflammation of the brain in birds, in the United States: exotic Newcastle, avian influenza, and Eastern Equine encephalitis (EEE), I knew this was something new. It wasn’t until I picked up the phone and called the U.S. Army and sai...
Source: GIDEON blog - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Epidemiology Events Outbreaks Tips Source Type: blogs
(Bloomberg) — There are four critical facets of pandemic prevention, according to Lee Hannah, senior scientist at Conservation International. Three of them make immediate sense against the backdrop of our current emergency: stockpile masks and respirators; have testing infrastructure ready; and ban the global wildlife trade, including the open animal markets where COVID-19 may have first infected people. His fourth recommendation is more grandiose: “Take care of nature.” The assault on ecosystems that allowed COVID-19 to jump from animals to humans went far beyond merchants hunting and selling rare wildli...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk wire Source Type: news
Authors: Conti P, Younes A Abstract CoV-19/SARS-CoV-2 is a highly pathogenic virus that causes coronavirus-19 disease (COVID-19) an acute respiratory distress syndrome which provokes serious problems for global health. Studies suggest that there are many differences between men and women in the immune response to CoV-19 infection and inflammatory diseases. Women, compared to men, are less susceptible to viral infections based on a different innate immunity, steroid hormones and factors related to sex chromosomes. The presence of two X chromosomes in women emphasize the immune system even if one is inactive. The imm...
Source: Journal of Biological Regulators and Homeostatic Agents - Category: Biomedical Science Tags: J Biol Regul Homeost Agents Source Type: research
Dr. Colleen Kraft was part of the Emory University team that successfully cared for America's first Ebola patients. She now is a cool-headed stalwart who is soothing nerves during the coronavirus pandemic.
Source: L.A. Times - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Source Type: news
Dr. Colleen Kraft was part of the Emory University team that successfully cared for America's first Ebola patients. She now is a cool-headed stalwart who is soothing nerves during the coronavirus pandemic.
Source: L.A. Times - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Source Type: news
(American Chemical Society) As the coronavirus pandemic claims lives and overwhelms health care systems throughout the world, scientists are closely watching several late-stage trials of the antiviral drug remdesivir. Developed to treat Ebola, remdesivir is now being tested against COVID-19. However, many infectious disease experts caution that the trials are unlikely to yield clear-cut results, according to an article inChemical&Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Zororo Makamba wasn’t supposed to die of the novel coronavirus. Not just because of his age, which at 30 placed him well out of the at-risk category for COVID-19 complications, but because of who he was. A well-known, pro-government media personality in Zimbabwe, and the son of a prominent business mogul, Makamba had the wealth and the connections that should have guaranteed him the best care possible. Instead, on March 23, Zimbabwe’s first confirmed case of the coronavirus died alone in a quarantined hospital, three days after his diagnosis. Hospital staff, lacking protective equipment, were afraid to come nea...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
CONCLUSION: All examined treatments, although potentiality effective against COVID-19, need either appropriate drug development or clinical trial to be suitable for clinical use. PMID: 32251618 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: J Pharm Pharm Sci - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: J Pharm Pharm Sci Source Type: research
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