Africa: UNFPA West and Central Africa Regional Planning Meeting to hold in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea
[UNFPA in WCA] To focus on Nairobi summit on ICPD25 commitments in the region (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 21, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Could a matchbox-sized electrical implant end the misery of diabetes, asthma AND arthritis? 
Kelly Owens, 30, volunteered in 2017 to be a guinea pig in a trial of a revolutionary technique that could offer a new treatment for dozens of diseases, including arthritis and asthma. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Coronavirus Outbreak Should Bring Out the Best in Humanity
Pandemics are perversely democratic. They’re nasty, lethal and sneaky, but they don’t discriminate. No matter your age, ethnicity, religion, gender, or nation, you’re a part of the pathogenic constituency. That shared vulnerability, and the resulting human collectivism—a universal response to a universal threat—is newly and vividly evident in the face of the now-global outbreak of the novel coronavirus known as 2019-nCoV. As of writing, there have been over 30,000 diagnosed cases and over 630 related deaths. A virus that emerged in a single city, Wuhan, China—indeed, in a single crowded ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV Infectious Disease Source Type: news

How Our Modern World Creates Outbreaks Like Coronavirus
“Everyone knows that pestilences have a way of recurring in the world,” observes Albert Camus in his novel The Plague. “Yet somehow we find it hard to believe in ones that crash down on our heads from a blue sky. There have been as many plagues as wars in history; yet plagues and wars always take people by surprise.” Camus was imagining a fictional outbreak of plague in 1948 in Oran, a port city in northwest Algeria. But at a time when the world is reeling from a very real microbial emergency sparked by the emergence of a novel coronavirus in Wuhan, central China, his observations are as pertinent a...
Source: TIME: Health - February 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mark Honigsbaum Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV health ideas Source Type: news

' Fragile' Africa Prepares for High Risk of Coronavirus Spread'Fragile' Africa Prepares for High Risk of Coronavirus Spread
An isolation ward stands ready at a hospital in Khartoum, Sudan. Laboratories in Senegal and Madagascar have the testing equipment they need. Passengers arriving at airports in Gambia, Cameroon and Guinea are being screened for fever and other viral symptoms.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

This Doctor Was Vilified After Contracting Ebola. Now He Sees History Repeating Itself With Coronavirus
Panic swept through New York City in fall 2014 when Dr. Craig Spencer became the first person in the giant metropolis to be diagnosed with Ebola. The physician had contracted the deadly disease while helping sick patients in the hard-hit West African country of Guinea as a volunteer. As Spencer’s liver was failing and his then-fiancée was quarantined in their apartment, the public vilified him, picking apart his previous destinations and activities, including riding the subway and going bowling. Now, amid another public health emergency as the novel coronavirus outbreak spreads internationally, Spencer says th...
Source: TIME: Health - February 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melissa Chan Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV Source Type: news

Global heating a serious threat to the world's climate refuges, study finds
Biodiversity hotspots with millions of years of climate stability could be among the world ’s hardest hit regionsBiodiversity hotspots that have given species a safe haven from changing climates for millions of years will come under threat from human-driven global heating, a new study has found.Species that have evolved in tropical regions suchAustralia ’s wet tropics, the Guinean forests of Western Africa and the Andes Mountains will come under increasing stress as the planet warms, the study finds.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 4, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Graham Readfearn Tags: Environment Climate change Biodiversity Conservation Wildlife Australia news Science Endangered species Endangered habitats Animals Source Type: news

Nigeria: 100 Million Nigerians Threatened By Tropical Diseases, Says Ehanire
[This Day] Abuja -The Minister of Health, Dr. Osagie Ehanire, has said about 100 million Nigerians are currently faced with the risk of some tropical diseases such as Guinea worm, leprosy, elephantiasis, river blindness, rabies and sleeping sickness. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 31, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Has coronavirus reached AFRICA? Sudan reports two suspected cases
Two citizens of Sudan are being monitored after displaying symptoms of the virus following a visit to Wuhan, local reports say. Officials in Equatorial Guinea have quarantined four travellers from China. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Liberia: How Is Liberia Preparing for the Wuhan Coronavirus (2019-Ncov)?
[Observer] A disease epidemic with the potential for pandemic proportions is upon us again. Unlike the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) which caught Liberia and neighboring Sierra Leone and Guinea off guide, there is a worldwide alarm on the emergence of a coronavirus in the city of Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 27, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Remarkable Walking Sharks Are Strutting All Over and Here ’s Their Deal
Scientists have discovered four new species of walking sharks proving the ocean somehow can always seem a little more mysterious. According to a study published in the Marine and Freshwater Research journal on Tuesday, the Hemiscylliidae genus of sharks “walk” using their pectoral and pelvic fins to move across the ocean floor and live in coastal waters around northern Australia and the island of New Guinea. But if you’re now having visions of a walking Jaws strolling toward you through the surf, not to worry. The scientists who authored the study say that walking sharks, also called “epaulette&rdqu...
Source: TIME: Science - January 24, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Megan McCluskey Tags: Uncategorized animals clickmonsters onetime viral Source Type: news

The West Blames the Wuhan Coronavirus on China ’s Love of Eating Wild Animals. The Truth Is More Complex
This reporter was once served slices of sashimi still attached to the carcass of a gasping fish.) Eating wild animals is also considered a luxury because of their rarity and cost, much like game is in the West. Some practitioners of Traditional Chinese Medicine also believe that eating exotic creatures can cure certain ailments and boost “male potency.” “This is just part of Chinese culture,” says Yanzhong Huang, a public heath expert at the Council for Foreign Relations. “They love to eat anything alive.” Wild animals are, of course, especially problematic because their murky provenienc...
Source: TIME: Health - January 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Campbell / Wuhan, China Tags: Uncategorized China Infectious Disease onetime overnight Source Type: news

Why the Coronavirus Should Worry Us All
Colorized scanning electron micrograph of MERS virus particles (yellow) both budding and attached to the surface of infected VERO E6 cells (blue). Credit: NIAIDBy Ifeanyi NsoforABUJA, Jan 21 2020 (IPS) The coronavirus outbreak — which began in Wuhan, China, and causes a pneumonia-like illness — is raging across Asia, infecting close to 300 people and killing four. It was initially known to be transmitted from animals to human, and was just confirmed to be transmitted from human to human. The rapid nature of its origin and speed in transmission reminds us that national security is threatened when ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ifeanyi Nsofor Tags: Global Headlines Health Source Type: news

2019 – A Devastating Year in Review
The glaciers of the Andes Mountains are threatened by global warming. Credit: Julieta Sokolowicz/IPSBy Farhana Haque RahmanROME, Dec 16 2019 (IPS) By any measure this has been a devastating year: fires across the Amazon, the Arctic and beyond; floods and drought in Africa; rising temperatures, carbon emissions and sea levels; accelerating loss of species, and mass forced migrations of people. As seen through the eyes of IPS reporters and contributors around the world, 2019 will be remembered as the year the climate crisis shook us all, and hopefully also for the fight back manifested in the spread of mass protests and civ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Farhana Haque Rahman Tags: Active Citizens Biodiversity Civil Society Climate Change Combating Desertification and Drought Development & Aid Economy & Trade Environment Featured Gender Gender Violence Global Headlines Health Human Rights Migration & Re Source Type: news

Young Advocates, Political Will Drive Progress on Family Planning in Francophone West Africa
December 05, 2019Countries throughout francophone West Africa are celebrating progress in family planning this week at the Ouagadougou Partnership (OP)annual meeting in Cotonou, Benin, where the theme isWe Demand More: Youth and Social Behavior Change.In 2015, the nine OP countries—Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Guinea, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Senegal, and Togo—exceeded their initial goal of reaching one million additional individuals with modern contraception and then committed to reaching 2.2 million additional users by the end of 2020. So far, OP leaders announced Tuesday, the countrie...
Source: IntraHealth International - December 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Tags: Benin Burkina Faso C ôte d’Ivoire Guinea Mali Mauritania Niger Senegal Togo Ouagadougou Partnership Coordination Unit Family Planning & Reproductive Health Community Engagement Leadership and Governance Policy Advocacy Source Type: news

Ex-opiate addict says implant saved him, but some call him a "guinea pig"
Alvin Dutruch took a chance on a new way to treat addiction — now a consumer group says he was exploited. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - November 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Four Ways to Prevent Deaths from Lassa Fever
Credit: S. Oka/WHO By Ifeanyi NsoforABUJA, Nov 27 2019 (IPS) Dr. Wouter, a Dutch doctor who helped perform surgeries and train colleagues in surgical skills in underserved areas of Sierra Leone died of Lassa Fever. He was infected as a result of performing a Caesarean section on an infected pregnant woman.  This was a very painful and avoidable death. I mourn with his family and the Dutch people over this loss. No health worker should die while trying to save lives. Sadly, every year 5,000 West Africans die from Lassa fever. Lassa fever is a viral disease of inequity and disproportionately affects ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ifeanyi Nsofor Tags: Africa Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Lassa Fever Source Type: news

Dark Waters Tells the True Story of the Lawyer Who Took DuPont to Court and Won. But Rob Bilott ’s Fight Is Far From Over
Rob Bilott, a corporate lawyer-turned-environmental crusader, doesn’t much care if he’s made enemies over the years. “I’ve been dealing with this for almost three decades,” he says. “I can’t really worry about if the people on the other side like me or not.” Bilott used to be on the other side. The Todd Haynes-directed movie Dark Waters, now playing in theaters, tells the story of how the lawyer, played by Mark Ruffalo, switched allegiances. As happened in real life, the movie depicts Ruffalo’s Bilott as a lawyer who defends large chemical companies before he is approac...
Source: TIME: Health - November 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized movies onetime Source Type: news

Dark Waters Tells the True Story of the Lawyer Who Took DuPont to Court and Won. But Rob Bilott ’s Fight Is Far From Over
Rob Bilott, a corporate lawyer-turned-environmental crusader, doesn’t much care if he’s made enemies over the years. “I’ve been dealing with this for almost three decades,” he says. “I can’t really worry about if the people on the other side like me or not.” Bilott used to be on the other side. The Todd Haynes-directed movie Dark Waters, now playing in theaters, tells the story of how the lawyer, played by Mark Ruffalo, switched allegiances. As happened in real life, the movie depicts Ruffalo’s Bilott as a lawyer who defends large chemical companies before he is approac...
Source: TIME: Science - November 25, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized movies onetime Source Type: news

Eating broccoli found to help with brain and nerve repair
(Natural News) Numerous studies show that the brain can repair and renew nervous tissue. People may support these natural processes by eating sulforaphane-rich foods like broccoli. Neuroscience experts previously believed that the brain cannot repair damaged neurons. However, a study conducted by MIT researcher Joseph Altman in the 1960s showed that the brains of adult rats, adult guinea pigs,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Liberia: Liberia Hosts Multi Countries Workshop On Tobacco Taxation Policy and Sustainable Health Financing
[WHO] The World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa (WHO AFRO) convened a high-level two-day workshop on tobacco taxation and sustainable health financing in Monrovia, Liberia from 19th to 20th September 2019. The participants at the workshop included focal points for Tobacco Taxation and Tobacco Control in the Ministries of Finance and Ministries of Health from selected countries in the Region including: Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Mauritius , Seychelles, Guinea, Central Africa Republic, Cameroon and Libe (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 7, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Four Ways the African Development Bank Can Support a More Secure Africa
An eight-month-old boy is examined by a doctor in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Credit: Kristin Palitza/IPS By Ifeanyi NsoforABUJA, Nov 7 2019 (IPS) Free movement of people and goods across Africa increases the risk of transmission of infectious diseases. The continent must realise that it is no longer a question of if disease outbreaks will occur, but instead, of when, and how fast. The U.S. Centres for Disease Control says that within 36 hours, a disease outbreak can spread from a remote village to major urban cities of the world. According to preventepidemics.org, a website which ranks countries’ levels of e...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ifeanyi Nsofor Tags: Africa Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs Source Type: news

Monday ’s Daily Brief: US formally announces climate accord withdrawal, young foreigners stranded in Syria, India toxic smog crisis, Ebola worker death shows frontline risks
A recap of stories this Monday: UN reaction to US Paris Agreement withdrawal; UNICEF urges repatriation of children stranded in Syria; Public health emergency in India’s New Delhi; Ebola health worker death in DR Congo shows deadly risks; Guinea Bissau crisis, Security Council update; UNEP campaign targets ocean microplastics. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - November 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Progress Toward Global Eradication of Dracunculiasis - January 2018-June 2019
This report, based on updated health ministry data, describes progress to eradicate dracunculiasis during January 2018-June 2019 and updates previous reports. (Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - October 31, 2019 Category: American Health Tags: Global Health MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Guinea Worm Disease [Dracunculiasis] Safe Water System Source Type: news

Wednesday ’s Daily Brief: Iraq protests, ‘historic’ Syria talks, Chile pulls out of COP25, Guinea-Bissau, South Sudan, new nuclear watchdog chief
A recap of Wednesday’s stories: new Syria talks begin in Geneva; Chile pulls out as host of major climate conference; UN calls for national talks to break cycle of violence in Iraq; UN chief voices ‘serious concern’ over Guinea-Bissau political crisis; IOM suspends South Sudan Ebola screening; UN atomic watchdog appoints new leader.   (Source: UN News Centre - Women, Children, Population)
Source: UN News Centre - Women, Children, Population - October 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

He ’s the First African American to Receive a Face Transplant. His Story Could Change Health Care
Robert Chelsea turned down the first face he was offered. It was a fine face, one that could have taken him off the transplant waiting list after just a couple months. But Chelsea—severely disfigured after a catastrophic car accident five years earlier—was in no hurry. He’d gotten used to tilting his head back so food and water wouldn’t fall out of his nearly lipless mouth. He knew how to respond compassionately to children who stared in shock and fear. The face, offered in May 2018, had belonged to a man with skin that was much fairer than what remained of Chelsea’s—so light that Chelse...
Source: TIME: Health - October 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Healthcare Source Type: news

Concussion PSA Compares Youth Football Dangers To Smoking
BOSTON (AP) — Everybody seems to be having fun when the kids in a new public service announcement are just playing football, until one boy is thrown to the ground and the background music turns ominous. Then, the coach starts handing out cigarettes. “Tackle football is like smoking,” a youthful voice-over says as a smiling, motherly type lights a cigarette for one of the pre-teen players. “The younger I start, the longer I’m exposed to danger.” “Tackle Can Wait ” is part of a campaign by the Boston-based Concussion Legacy Foundation to steer children under 14 years old into f...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - October 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Concussion Legacy Foundation Concussions Youth Football Source Type: news

New Report Reveals Widespread Abuse, Mistreatment of Women During Childbirth
(JOHANNESBURG) — A new report says more than one-third of women in four low-income countries in Africa and Asia were slapped, mocked, forcibly treated or otherwise abused during childbirth in health centers and suggests that such mistreatment occurs worldwide. The study published Wednesday in The Lancet medical journal says women in Nigeria, Myanmar, Ghana and Guinea also experienced high rates of cesarean sections and surgical cuts to the vagina, or episiotomies, without their consent — and often without a painkiller. “Mistreatment during childbirth can amount to a violation of human rights, and could be...
Source: TIME: Health - October 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized health onetime Source Type: news

Liberia: Spotlight On Guinea for Counterfeit Medicines
[Observer] The Pharmacy Board of Liberia (PBL), has put the Republic of Guinea on the spotlight for being one of the leading centers for "counterfeit medical drugs in West Africa. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - October 8, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

The End Of Guinea Worm Was Just Around the Corner. Not Anymore
The World Health Organization had hoped to eradicate the painful parasite by 2020. That deadline just got moved a decade into the future. And dogs are part of the problem.(Image credit: Sally Deng for NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tim McDonnell Source Type: news

The Climate Crisis is Global, but These 6 Places Face the Most Severe Consequences
Climate change is expected to affect every country in the world, but its impact will not be felt equally across all regions and some will be worse hit than others because of a range of different threats. Developing countries, places with widespread poverty, and countries with ineffective governments sometimes face the gravest risks from the changing climate, and are usually poorly equipped to find ways to prepare for and prevent environmental threats. Measuring the future impact of climate change is very challenging, because scientists’ climate change projections cannot be completely exact and because there are many ...
Source: TIME: Science - October 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime Source Type: news

Data Sharing: A Cholera Case Study
Source: Wellcome Trust. Published: 11/30/2019. This 27-page study aims to better understand the barriers and enablers for research data sharing during recent epidemics of cholera in Western Africa. It takes into consideration the experiences at a country level from outbreaks in Guinea and C ôte d’Ivoire in 2012 and 2014 respectively, as well as the region’s general experience up until 2018, to gather specific and general lessons learned. The study was also funded by United Kingdom Department of International Development. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - September 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How Juul Hooked Kids and Ignited a Public Health Crisis
In the Scheetz household, back-to-school anxiety reached new heights this fall. Jami Scheetz’s 15-year-old son Devon, who has severe asthma, kicked a brutal vaping habit over the summer, with help from a nicotine patch. But as soon as school started and he was once again around kids vaping, his habit returned. On Sept. 12, Devon vaped at school and immediately began sweating and vomiting. Though Scheetz, who lives in Sellersville, Pa., says her son is now fine, she can’t shake thoughts of kids who have been hospitalized or died after using e-cigarettes. “Vaping scares me more [than smoking], because they ...
Source: TIME: Health - September 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized vaping Source Type: news

Ebola survivors face kidney problems and risk of premature death
People who survive Ebola virus infection face a dramatically higher risk of dying - probably from severe kidney damage - within a year of leaving hospital, according to a study of survivors of an epidemic in Guinea. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Ebola now curable after trials of drugs in DRC, say scientists
Congo results show good survival rates for patients treated quickly with antibodiesEbola can no longer be called an incurable disease, scientists have said, after two of four drugs being trialled in themajor outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo were found to have significantly reduced the death rate.ZMapp, used during the massive Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea, has been dropped along with Remdesivir after two monoclonal antibodies, which block the virus, had substantially more effect, said the World Health Organization and the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which w...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Ebola Democratic Republic of the Congo Africa World news Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Pharmaceuticals industry World Health Organization Source Type: news

Mother, 27, smiles for the first time in nearly 20 years after doctors removed a massive tumour
Isatu, whose surname is unknown, developed a lump on her jaw when she was just 10, with it soon taking over one side of her face. She trekked 200 miles (321km) to Guinea for treatment. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Deploying Experimental Vaccines Against Ebola
The most expedient way to test Johnson and Johnson's experimental Ebola vaccine is to administer it during an outbreak, which is the way Merck's vaccine was successfully deployed in Guinea in 2015. Locally, however, there are fears people in the Congo could be used as guinea pigs. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - August 9, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Joshua Cohen, Contributor Source Type: news

Uganda: The Uganda Vaccine Trial - How African Researchers Are Tackling Ebola
[The Conversation Africa] In August 2015 Dr Sakoba Keita, who led the Ebola response in Guinea during the largest Ebola outbreak the world has ever seen, declared: (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - August 8, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Dual Therapy Might Be Advance Against Genital Herpes, Animal Study Suggests
THURSDAY, Aug. 1, 2019 -- It's only been tried so far in guinea pigs, but researchers say a combination of a vaccine and a medicated cream could greatly lower recurrence of genital herpes. The condition is very common, affecting about one out of... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 1, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Global Aids Fight Running out of Steam, U.N. says
BANGLADESH: Dose of Vigilance Helps Manage HIV, AIDS DHAKA, Nov 3, 2010 (IPS) - It is one of the poorest countries in the world, has a low literacy rate, and is next door to at least two countries that have a considerable portion of their respective populations with HIV and AIDS. Yet even having a large migrant population has not made Bangladesh a hot spot for HIV and AIDS. http://ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=53443By James ReinlUNITED NATIONS, Jul 24 2019 (IPS) The global fight against Aids is floundering amid cash shortfalls and spikes in new HIV infections among marginalised groups in developing regions, Gunilla Carlsson,...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: James Reinl Tags: Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Source Type: news

Here ’s How the World Can Be Better Prepared to Handle Epidemics
In 2019, there are measles outbreaks in the US and Europe; Ebola outbreak in DRC and Uganda and several other infectious disease outbreaks in Nigeria, Vietnam and South Africa. Credit: Marc-André Boisvert/IPSBy Ifeanyi NsoforABUJA, Jul 19 2019 (IPS) The 2019 G20 Summit was held recently in Osaka, Japan. The Summit ended with the “G20 Osaka Leaders’ Declaration”, which identifies health as a prerequisite for sustainable and inclusive economic growth, and the leaders committed to various efforts to improve epidemic preparedness.  These efforts are commendable, but the G20, compris...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ifeanyi Nsofor Tags: Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

The U.S. Helped Defeat Ebola in 2014. Now, We ’re Watching a Crisis Become a Catastrophe
Imagine a firefighter battling a blaze while the sprinkler system emits gasoline. This is the current state of the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). So far, over 1,600 people have died from the virus and thousands more have been infected. While this outbreak is not yet at the scale of the last Ebola crisis that claimed more than 11,000 lives, it has the potential to be even deadlier. With each passing day, the virus keeps spreading. This week, the first case of Ebola was discovered in Goma, a transportation hub on the border of Rwanda. In order to keep pace with the virus, the United States and th...
Source: TIME: Health - July 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gayle E. Smith Tags: Uncategorized ebola Source Type: news

Experimental Ebola Treatments Look Successful in Lab Studies, Says the CDC
A humanitarian crisis, attacks on health workers and rampant misinformation have for months fueled an Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), amplifying the effects of a highly contagious and often-fatal disease. As a result, international health groups have declared this the second-worst Ebola outbreak in history, with more than 1,500 people dying since it started in August 2018. New research from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers some hope, highlighting two treatments that could help bring the deadly outbreak under control. The study, published in the Lancet Infectious...
Source: TIME: Health - July 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease Source Type: news

'I want to be a guinea pig to help others'
How one amputee is helping scientists improve the lives of other people who rely on prosthetic limbs. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - June 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Liberia: World Bank Screens Documentary On 'Resilience' of Ebola-Affected Countries
[Observer] -- Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea lauded for their response to the fight against the disease (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 18, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Chimpanzees catch and eat crabs
(University of Zurich) Chimpanzees have a mainly vegetarian diet, but do occasionally eat meat. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now shown for the first time that chimpanzees also eat crabs. In the rainforest of Guinea, the researchers observed how chimpanzees regularly fish for crabs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In the Loop: Volunteering as a family in Papua New Guinea
A six-month overseas mission trip with her family was life changing in many ways for Jenn Rodemeyer, including how she views her work as a child life specialist at Mayo Clinic. Jenn Rodemeyer stood among her students, sharing simple lessons about good hygiene. When it came time to share tips for tooth brushing, she picked [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - May 21, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Africa: Survival Lessons for Congo in the Aftershock of West Africa's Ebola Crisis
[The New Humanitarian] For écariah/Guinea -'Every day I have in my head that it's today I'll die' (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - May 17, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Doctors used as 'guinea pigs' in opioid painkiller promotion
Drug companies are accused of "targeting doctors" to market opioids. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - May 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Congo-Kinshasa: Why I Chose to Help - a Doctor From Guinea On Why She Volunteered for the DRC Ebola Crisis
[WHO] On 24 July 2018, the Ministry of Health of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) declared the end of the ninth outbreak of Ebola virus disease (over the past four decades) in the country. With the first of 54 total cases reported in May 2018 in Équateur Province, the outbreak was contained quickly, but not before 33 persons had died, including two of the seven health care workers who became infected. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - May 6, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news