Africa: Ethiopia, Mali Report Zero Human Cases of Guinea Worm
[Carter Center] Atlanta -Just 28 human cases of Guinea worm disease were reported in 2018, down slightly from 30 cases reported in 2017. When The Carter Center assumed leadership of the Guinea Worm Eradication Program in 1986, there were an estimated 3.5 million human cases annually in 21 countries in Africa and Asia. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 18, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Fatimata Sy on Partnering to Expand Access to Contraceptives
By Ruchika Tulshyan, Contributor, The OptimistJanuary 17, 2019Fatimata Sy  talks to The Optimist about her work, the future of family planning, and her own audacious personal goal.When it launched in 2011, theOuagadougou Partnership set an audacious goal for 2020: Increase the number of women using modern contraceptives by at least 2.2 million in nine francophone West African countries.Historically, not many women in the region used contraceptives because of socio-cultural factors and infrastructure challenges. But members of the Partnership were determined to prove that with the right approach, family pla...
Source: IntraHealth International - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: cbishopp Tags: Ouagadougou Partnership Coordination Unit Family Planning & Reproductive Health Source Type: news

New study shows how guinea pig fathers pass on adaptive responses to environmental changes
(Forschungsverbund Berlin) Adaptations to environmental change are the most important asset for the persistence of any plant or animal species. This is usually achieved through genetic mutation and selection, a slow process driven by chance. Faster and more targeted are epigenetic modifications. A new study carried out by scientists from the Leibniz-IZW in Germany shows for wild guinea pigs that epigenetic modifications specific to individual environmental factors are passed on to the next generation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

From spectacular orchids to towering trees – 2018's top new plant discoveries
Around the world, species hunters unearth 128 vascular plants and 44 species of fungi, many already facing extinctionA spectacular orchid sold from a barrow in a Laos market, a flower which may contain cancer-fighting chemicals, and a tall tree found beside an African highway, are among more than 100 plants that were newly discovered by science in 2018. But experts warn it is a “race against time” to discover many new species before they become extinct.Species hunters scouring the globe for the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and its partners, this year found about 128 vascular plants and 44 species of fungi.Contin...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Patrick Barkham Tags: Plants Biology Kew Gardens Endangered species Guinea Environment Science Endangered habitats Conservation Cameroon Sierra Leone Laos Wildlife Source Type: news

West Africa: Why Ebola Is Proving Hard to Beat in the DR Congo
[The Conversation Africa] Nearly this time exactly two years ago I wrote about the latest positive results showing - for the first time - that a vaccine against one of the world's scariest viruses, Ebola, could work. I was writing after the epidemic that hit Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone from 2013 until 2016. Since then, there have been three more outbreaks of the disease: all in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 20, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Ouagadougou Partnership Countries on Track to Meet 2020 Family Planning Goals
December 19, 2018At the 7th annual meeting of theOuagadougou Partnership last week, about 350 delegates from more than a dozen countries came together to celebrate the partnership ’s successes and progress toward its goals, including reaching 2.2 million more people in nine francophone West African countries with modern family planning methods by 2020.The Ouagadougou Partnership is a coalition of government officials, religious leaders, civil society members, and youth representatives from nine countries —Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Guinea, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Senegal, and Togo—wo...
Source: IntraHealth International - December 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: cbishopp Tags: Family Planning & Reproductive Health Source Type: news

Guinea Worm Disease (Dracunculiasis)
(Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - December 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

New Field Test Discerns Between Ebola and Lookalike Fevers
At the close of the 2014-2016 West Africa Ebola crisis, the Paul G. Allen Foundation identified diagnostic gaps as one of the major deficiencies that had contributed to the outbreak’s spread. “The standard diagnostic tests that exist are very good, but they’re hard to do out in the field in the middle of an outbreak like we saw in West Africa,” said John Connor, a virologist at the Boston University National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratory (NEIDL). Instead, samples need to be sent to a facility capable of running the tests, which means it could...
Source: MDDI - December 13, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: IVD Source Type: news

People are like the guinea-pigs on some vast experimental farm – archive, 7 December 1950
7 December 1950:Humans scuttle about misusing energy, trying to get into forbidden enclosures, playing and fighting and hugely propagating themselvesEverybody is so busy looking out for flying saucers – with, it is now suspected, tiny nuclear physicists sitting astride them – that portents much nearer home tend to get neglected. There were the Bridlington starlings, an extraordinary manifestation of the omen instinct. A multitude of these birds, it may be remembered, recently descended upon t he town with a noise like jet aeroplanes, carried out a thorough reconnaissance which took them into bedrooms and even b...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Norman Shrapnel Tags: Animal behaviour Animals Wildlife Source Type: news

'We're guinea pigs': Canada's oversight process for implanted medical devices stuns suffering patients
Millions of Canadians rely on surgically implanted medical devices in order to function — to do everything from walk without pain to pump blood through their veins. But a new CBC investigation reveals some devices are approved with scant scientific evidence to show they are safe and effective. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - November 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Meet Denny, the ancient mixed-heritage mystery girl
After the unearthing of a Neanderthal-Denisovan fossil, UK scientists are using groundbreaking techniques to learn more of the species ’ complex bonds with humansOf all the ancient peoples that have been studied by scientists, none has set puzzles quite so profound as those left behind by the Denisovans. Only a few tiny pieces of bone and teeth have ever been found of this long extinct species – fragmentary remains that would all fit snugly inside a cigarette packet.Yet these fossil scraps suggest that Denisovans had a considerable influence on people today. Up to 6% of the genes now found in modern New Guinean...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Tags: Evolution Anthropology Neanderthals Science Biology Research University of Oxford University of Manchester Source Type: news

Getting to Zero: Lessons on Ebola and Global Health Security
November 20, 2018We sat down with  Oliver Johnson to find out how West Africa's 2014  outbreak is informing DRC's today.As news from the epicenter of the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC)worsens, how can the lessons from the 2014-2016 West Africa Ebola outbreak help?I sat down with Dr. Oliver Johnson, coauthor ofGetting to Zero: A Doctor and a Diplomat on the Ebola Frontline, who worked on the frontlines of the West Africa outbreak, to find out. He stressed that while we ’ve learned a lot about Ebola, most of it has involved technical aspects, such as themedical innovations and treatm...
Source: IntraHealth International - November 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

Papua New Guinea Is Rich in Resources but Poor in Health
The Pacific nation hoped that hosting the APEC summit meeting would elevate its international profile, but a national health crisis threatens to overshadow it. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - November 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JO CHANDLER Tags: Medicine and Health Epidemics Poliomyelitis Australia Papua New Guinea Manus Island (Papua New Guinea) Source Type: news

Malaria Hits Papua New Guinea Once Again
(MedPage Today) -- Historic declines in 2013-2014 offset by major increase in 2017 (Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease)
Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease - October 30, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

First humans to reach Australia likely island-hopped to New Guinea then walked – study
Researchers map likeliest route using least-cost calculations, line-of-sight sailing and likely sea levelsThe first people to arrive in Australia are likely to have sailed east from Borneo to Sulawesi and island-hopped to New Guinea, according to research.A study led by Australian National University PhD candidate Shimona Kealy andpublished in the Journal of Human Evolution has modelled the most likely route from southeast Asia to the Australian mainland based on which pathway would have required the least expenditure of energy and resources.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 30, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Calla Wahlquist Tags: Indigenous Australians Asia Pacific Australia news Australian universities World news Archaeology Anthropology Evolution Science Source Type: news

West Africa's Ebola Outbreak Cost $53 Bln - Study West Africa's Ebola Outbreak Cost $53 Bln - Study
An Ebola outbreak that ravaged Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia in 2014 cost economies an estimated $53 billion, according to a study in this month's Journal of Infectious Diseases.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - October 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

West Africa's Ebola outbreak cost $53 billion - study
An Ebola outbreak that ravaged Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia in 2014 cost economies an estimated $53 billion, according to a study in this month's Journal of Infectious Diseases. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - October 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Hope for a Lassa fever vaccine as scientists reveal jab shows promise
Researchers from Philadelphia University and Thomas Jefferson University tested a new vaccine on mice and guinea pigs and said it showed 'good protection' and was a step forward. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vaccine effectively protects against Lassa fever, rabies
A new vaccine showed preclinical promise at effectively protecting people from Lassa fever and rabies in a study involving mice and guinea pigs. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - October 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Girls are saying no to FGM – and they need political champions
UNITED NATIONS, New York– “When I was young, I did not want to be cut,” said Aissata Camara, speaking at the High-Level Panel on Female Genital Mutilation, held during the 73rd Session of the United Nations General Assembly.“I am one of those 200 million girls who have been cut,” said the Guinean-American activist and co-founder of the There Is No Limit Foundation. “I am here to speak for the 68 million that are now at risk.” (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - October 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: grojec Source Type: news

Vaping 'guinea pigs': E-cigarette health risks you may not be aware of
As vaping products, and the promotion of them, become more prevalent, health professionals are warning e-cigarettes are not as safe as many people believe them to be. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - October 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Toronto Source Type: news

How Scientists Are Treating Breast Cancer Using the Immune System
As a pharmacist, Kathy James considers herself well educated about the importance of getting regular cancer screenings. Even though the 55-year-old had no history of cancer in her family, she never skipped her regular mammograms, and she gave herself regular breast exams. So she was dumbfounded when, during one of those self-exams in May 2017, she felt a marble-size lump in her left breast. A visit to the doctor confirmed it. “The radiologist came in with his hands in his pockets and looked down and said, ‘It doesn’t look good,'” James says. After a biopsy, James and her husband learned she had meta...
Source: TIME: Health - October 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized breast cancer news Frontiers of Medicine Source Type: news

How Scientists Are Treating Breast Cancer Using the Immune System
As a pharmacist, Kathy James considers herself well educated about the importance of getting regular cancer screenings. Even though the 55-year-old had no history of cancer in her family, she never skipped her regular mammograms, and she gave herself regular breast exams. So she was dumbfounded when, during one of those self-exams in May 2017, she felt a marble-size lump in her left breast. A visit to the doctor confirmed it. “The radiologist came in with his hands in his pockets and looked down and said, ‘It doesn’t look good,'” James says. After a biopsy, James and her husband learned she had meta...
Source: TIME: Science - October 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized breast cancer news Frontiers of Medicine Source Type: news

Vaccines, and their benefits beyond immunisation
How do vaccination programmes influence child survival in low-income countries? Protection against the targeted illness is not the only aspect to consider, according to an EU-funded project that explored associated outcomes known as 'non-specific effects'. The research focused on public health interventions in Burkina Faso, Ghana and Guinea-Bissau. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - October 3, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Critics Demand Stop to ‘ Guinea Pig ’ Sepsis Clinical Trial
Clovers trial seeks to determine which IV fluids, vasopressors combo works best to curb sepsis (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - September 26, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Infections, Oncology, Critical Care, Institutional, Source Type: news

Morning Break: MSKCC's Baselga in Spotlight; MAT Ratings; Human Guinea Pigs
(MedPage Today) -- Health news and commentary from around the Web gathered by the MedPage Today staff (Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry)
Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry - September 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: news

Tanzania:Dar Scores High in Fighting Bilharzia, Guinea Worm
[Daily News] TANZANIA has made tremendous strides in eradicating Bilharzia and Guinea Worm Disease, thanks to ambitious school health programme currently undertaken by the government. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 6, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

STI that causes genitals to erupt and rot is diagnosed in Southport
Usually found in tropical locations, such as New Guinea, the STI, known as donovanosis, causes ulcers to grow and spread on the intimate regions, before the flesh of the genitals starts to eat itself. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rare flesh-eating STI that causes genitals to erupt and ROT has been diagnosed in Southport
Usually found in tropical locations, such as New Guinea, the STI, known as donovanosis, causes ulcers to grow and spread on the intimate regions, before the flesh of the genitals starts to eat itself. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A critical review of potential tsunamigenic sources as first step towards the tsunami hazard assessment for the Napoli Gulf (Southern Italy) highly populated area - Alberico I, Budillon F, Casalbore D, Fiore VD, Iavarone R.
Catastrophic tsunami events like those occurred in Papua New Guinea in 1998, Sumatra in 2004 and Japan in 2011, attracted the attention of the scientific community and promoted the development of different tools for assessing tsunami hazard. A preliminary ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news

Relief for women facing treacherous journey to medical care in Guinea-Bissau
BISSAU, Guinea-Bissau – Until last month, when a woman needed an emergency Caesarean section on the island of Bubaque, in Guinea-Bissau, she had to take a five-hour boat ride to the capital city. And the boat ran only once a week.  Bubaque ’s regional hospital – which serves 17 islands in the Bijagos archipelago – did not have any surgical ward at all. It also lacked the ability to provide emergency obstetric and neonatal care.  (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - August 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: zerzan Source Type: news

'Nightwatch: First Responders' Short-Form Series to Premiere This Week
Beginning August 2nd on A&E, two of the stars of A&E’s hit series Nightwatch, Dan Flynn and Titus Tero, are stepping out of their ambulance and crisscrossing the country to shadow first responders of all types. Each episode of the short-form series NIGHTWATCH PRESENTS: FIRST RESPONDERS will feature the famous New Orleans EMS duo answering the invitation of highly-specialized first responder units, getting to know the responders and engaging in live rescue drills. Whether rushing into a burning structure in the woods of Slidell, Louisiana, pulling a victim from the raging currents of the Mississippi in Baton ...
Source: JEMS Operations - August 1, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: A.J. Heightman, MPA, EMT-P Tags: Operations News Source Type: news

Madagascar:HIV-TB Connection - Key to Ending Infections
[IPS] London -A group of teenage boys huddle around Michelle in the mangroves behind Joyce Bay, a spot frequented by men who have sex with men (MSM) in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea (PNG). (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - July 31, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

"We are guinea pigs": New documentary explores risks of medical devices
"The Bleeding Edge" filmmakers speak with patients suffering apparent complications from cobalt hip replacements and the Essure permanent birth control device (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - July 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

"We are Guinea pigs ”: New documentary explores risks of medical devices
"The Bleeding Edge" filmmakers speak with patients suffering apparent complications from cobalt hip replacements and the Essure permanent birth control device (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - July 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

"We are Guinea pigs ”: New docunmentary explores risks of medical devices
"The Bleeding Edge" filmmakers speak with patients suffering apparent complications from cobalt hip replacements and the Essure permanent birth control device (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - July 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Congo-Kinshasa:How DRC's Ebola Outbreak Has Been Contained
[VOA] The Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo appears to be in its waning days. Despite 28 deaths as of early June, health officials are cautiously optimistic that they are bringing the outbreak under control. So far, it's a striking turnaround from the 2014 West Africa outbreak, which killed more than 11,000 people in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea, and traveled as far as Glasgow, Scotland, and Dallas, Texas. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 25, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

HIV-TB Connection: Key to Ending Infections
Michelle, a transgender peer educator, walks through her village in Joyce Bay, Port Moresby. Credit: Tom MaguireBy Tom MaguireLONDON, Jul 24 2018 (IPS)A group of teenage boys huddle around Michelle in the mangroves behind Joyce Bay, a spot frequented by men who have sex with men (MSM) in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea (PNG). She asks them how regularly they have sex and whether they have been tested for HIV or tuberculosis (TB). Her questions are met with giggles, intrigue and confusion. It turned out that none of the eight present have been tested for either disease. Michelle is a peer educator working to test key populat...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tom Maguire Tags: Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

3 new Guinea worm cases found in setback for South Sudan
3 new Guinea worm cases found in South Sudan, a setback after closing in on eradication (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - July 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Monkeys benefit from the nut-cracking abilities of chimpanzees and hogs
(Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology) Researchers of the University of Amsterdam and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology describe for the first time the scavenging behaviour of mangabey monkeys, guinea fowls, and squirrels on energy-rich nut remnants cracked by chimpanzees and red river hogs. The team used data collected by camera traps in the rain forest of Tai National Park in Ivory Coast. The results reveal new unknown interactions between different species and increase our understanding of the complex community of animals foraging around tropical nut trees. (Source: EurekAlert! - Socia...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research suggests new vaccine candidates for malaria
(American Society for Microbiology) Researchers have shown that higher levels of Plasmodium falciparum antibodies are protective against severe malaria in children living in Papua New Guinea. Children who have higher levels of antibodies to a specific short amino acid sequence in the malaria parasite, P. falciparum, have much lower rates of clinical and severe malaria. This amino acid sequence, an antigen, is similar among P. falciparum strains elsewhere in the world, suggesting that this antigen would make a good target for a malaria vaccine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Circulating vaccine derived poliovirus – Papua New Guinea
On 21 May 2018, the regional polio reference laboratory reported to WHO the isolation of vaccine derived poliovirus type 1 (VDPV1) from a child with acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) in Lae, Morobe Province, Papua New Guinea. The onset of the child ’s paralysis occurred on 24 April 2018. (Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks)
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - July 2, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: news Source Type: news

The guinea pig at the Last Supper | Brief letters
Animal iconography | Ladybirds ’ absence | Measuring space gloop | Nat King Cole’s Route 66 | Morris mushrooms“I’m looking for the wombat in the altarpiece now,” says Heather Dalton, the historian who found a cockatoo in a 16th-century Italian altarpiece created long before Captain Cook washed up in Australia (Report, 27 June). She might enjoy the 17th-century painting of the Last Supper in Cuzco Cathedral in Peru, which shows a festive spread of wine, bread, fruit and, at the very centre of the painting, a roast guinea pig.Professor Rebecca EarleUniversity of Warwick• I have seen a few w...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 28, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Art Animals Insects Space Pop and rock Motoring Wildlife Butterflies Chuck Berry The Rolling Stones Environment Art and design World news Science Source Type: news

Meet Benedict Allen, the explorer rescued by the Daily Mail against his will
Last year ’s expedition in Papua New Guinea ended in him falling ill, being rescued by the newspaper and facing accusations of imperialism. What drives him to seek out yet more adventures?Benedict Allen arrives dressed like an explorer: all in green, multi-pocketed jacket, sturdy trousers, a bag that could carry accessories in the Amazon. It is a somewhat anachronistic get-up for a meeting in central London, at the Savoy hotel, but very useful given that we want a picture of him in the gardens next to the Embankment, which, for our purposes, will double as a jungle.He takes the artifice like a trouper, pushing aside ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 28, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Stephen Moss Tags: Exploration Science Papua New Guinea Amazon rainforest Indigenous peoples Source Type: news

Polio outbreak confirmed in Papua New Guinea
A polio outbreak has been confirmed in Morobe Province of Papua New Guinea, the World Health Organization reported Monday. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - June 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Papua New Guinea polio outbreak declared
The virus was detected in a six-year-old boy in April and confirmed in two healthy children last week. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - June 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

West Africa:As Millions Face Hunger in Sahel, More Accountability Is Needed to Attract Support, Warns Red Cross President
[IFRC] About 5.8 million people across Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania, Niger and Senegal are struggling to get enough food and require immediate assistance. To respond to their needs adequately, humanitarian actors need to manage well the funding they receive from their partners and well-wishers, warned Francesco Rocca, the President of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), during a visit to Guinea, from 18 to 20 June 2018. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 21, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Congo-Kinshasa:As DR Congo Grapples with Ebola, Guinea Keeps Up Its Guard
[VOA] Just after a morning rain, Gourma Mamadou was shopping in this capital city's crowded, open-air Kaloum market. The young man said he was well aware of the current Ebola outbreak simmering some 4,000 kilometers to the southeast in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, where the World Health Organization reports it has killed 28 people since April. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 20, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news