More Than 4,000 People Died From Measles in World ’s Largest Outbreak in Congo

(DAKAR, Senegal) — More than 4,000 people have died in Congo this year in the world’s largest measles outbreak, the United Nations children’s agency said Wednesday. The Central African nation is also battling an Ebola outbreak that has killed about half that number since August 2018. Since January, more than 200,000 cases of measles have been reported across Congo, UNICEF said. More than 140,000 involve children under 5, who also make up nearly 90 percent of deaths. “We’re facing this alarming situation because millions of Congolese children miss out on routine immunization and lack access to health care when they fall sick,” said the UNICEF country representative, Edouard Beigbeder. “On top of that, a weak health system, insecurity, community mistrust of vaccines and vaccinators and logistical challenges all contribute to a huge number of unvaccinated children at risk of contracting the disease.” Health officials are facing many of the same challenges in the Ebola outbreak in eastern Congo that has killed more than 2,000 people. Multiple armed groups have been fighting over the mineral-rich land for decades and threatening residents. The insecurity has led to mistrust of authorities, including health workers. UNICEF said health workers were rushing additional medical kits to help care for more than 110,000 people infected with the measles, a highly contagious and potentially deadly virus. More than 1.4 million children have be...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Disease onetime the Democratic Republic of Congo Source Type: news

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Devyn Holliday, Research Officer, Economic, Youth &Sustainable Development Directorate   This blog is part of the seminar series on ‘The Economics of COVID-19’.By Devyn HollidayJun 10 2020 (IPS-Partners) When countries shuttered their shops, closed their markets, and cordoned off places of gathering to help ward off the coronavirus, they did so out of immediate concern for the health and wellbeing of their citizens. However, as these measures endure the virus is no longer the sole threat to the health and wellbeing of citizens. People across the globe are facing mounting threats to their wellbeing c...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Economy & Trade Health Labour Source Type: news
This study uses a sample of 9581 vaccine-related tweets in the period January 1, 2019 to April 5, 2019. The time period is of the essence because during this time, a measles outbreak was prevalent throughout the United States and a public debate was raging. Sentiment analysis is applied to the sample, clustering the data into topics using the term frequency–inverse document frequency (TF-IDF) technique. The analyses suggest that most (about 77%) of the tweets focused on the search for new/better vaccines for diseases such as the Ebola virus, human papillomavirus (HPV), and the flu. Of the remainder, about half co...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
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Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
TTP, a technology company based in Melbourn, UK, is developing a handheld PCR (polymerase chain reaction) diagnostic device that can rapidly detect influenza viruses, and one day other viruses, in samples of nasal mucus. The company claims that the s...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Diagnostics Exclusive Public Health Source Type: blogs
[Deutsche Welle] The deadly virus has killed nearly three times as many people in the Democratic Republic of Congo as any Ebola outbreak. It's preventable with a vaccine.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news
[WHO] Kinshasa, 5 December 2019 - Around 2.2 million children are to be vaccinated against measles in North Kivu, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), where efforts are underway to curb the world's second-worst Ebola outbreak amid persistent insecurity.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized climate change health World Health Organization Source Type: news
The complete TWiV team give a report on the Ebola virus outbreak in DRC, and reveal that cell surface nectin proteins cause the transfer of cytoplasmic cargo, including measles virus, between cells. Click arrow to play Download TWiV 559 (65 MB .mp3, 108 min) Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV!
Source: virology blog - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: This Week in Virology Democratic Republic of the Congo Ebolavirus outbreak measles virus nect nectin nectin-elicited cytoplasmic transfer SSPE transcytosis vaccine viral viruses Source Type: blogs
The complete TWiV team give a report on the Ebola virus outbreak in DRC, and reveal that cell surface nectin proteins cause the transfer of cytoplasmic cargo, including measles virus, between cells. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, Kathy Spindler, and Brianne Barker Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Fire Alarm at ASV Ebola outbreak sitrep(WHO) Ebola outbreak dashboard(WHO) Ebola outbreakDRC (MSF) Ebola articles at CIDRAP Ebola virus vaccine could run out(STAT news) Nectin me...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - Category: Virology Authors: Source Type: podcasts
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