Brutal Toll of Osteoporotic Fractures Revealed in New NOF Report Brutal Toll of Osteoporotic Fractures Revealed in New NOF Report

Osteoporotic fractures are responsible for more hospitalizations than heart attacks, strokes, and breast cancer."The biggest surprise...is that things are worse than we thought," says one expert.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Emergency Medicine Headlines - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

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This study, as well as other research on the connection between diet and sugary beverages and health risks, is observational and cannot show cause and effect. That’s a major limitation, researchers say, as it’s impossible to determine whether the association is due to a specific artificial sweetener, a type of beverage, obesity or another hidden health issue. “The cause behind these associations isn’t clear,” said Bergquist. “Other potential biological causes could be attributed to experimental evidence linking consumption of artificial sweeteners to sugar cravings, appetite stimulation ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Soda Source Type: news
ConclusionsThere is a strong rationale for mammography to become a dual test for breast cancer screening and CV disease prevention. However, robust and automated quantification methods are needed for a deeper insight on the association between BAC and CV disease, to stratifying CV risk and define personalized preventive actions.Graphical abstract
Source: European Journal of Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
By STEVE ZECOLA Americans spend about $3 trillion per year on healthcare, or about $10,000 per person per year. Despite these expenditures, Americans are worse off than their international counterparts with respect to infant mortality, life expectancy and the prevalence of chronic conditions. In policy debates, Republicans mostly prefer to let the marketplace devise the appropriate outcomes, but this approach ignores the market failures that plague the industry. On the other hand, Democrats propose a variety of solutions such as “Medicare for All” which nationalizes all healthcare insurance or, as a va...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Policy Medicare For All Source Type: blogs
Although chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) prevalence and mortality rates rise continuously, patients often remain undiagnosed, probably due to a lack of disease-related awareness. The aim of this study was to quantify public interest in COPD by analysing the frequency of web queries via Google. Data from 2004 to 2018 were collected using the search engine query data analysis tool Google Trends. The relative search volume of the topic "chronic obstructive pulmonary disease" was compared with the relative search volume of nine topics representing the major causes of death in high-income countries accord...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: COPD and smoking Original Articles: COPD Source Type: research
In conclusions, dairy may be part of a healthy diet; however, additional studies exploring confounding factors are needed to ascertain the potential detrimental effects. PMID: 31199182 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition - Category: Nutrition Tags: Int J Food Sci Nutr Source Type: research
Remember Monty Python’s brilliant Life of Brian movie scene where the Palestinian insurgent commando, planning the abduction of Pilate’s wife in return for all the horrors they had to endure from the Roman Empire, asks the rhetorical question: what have the Romans ever done for us? With the hype and overmarketing, not to speak about the fears around A.I, we asked the same question. What has A.I. in medicine ever done for us? Well, we found at least 45 things. I have 45 responses to the pressing question on everyone’s mind who is interested in healthcare but tired of the hype or the doomsday scenarios a...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Future of Medicine administration AI cancer diagnostics digital health digital health technology Healthcare Innovation medical medical imaging Radiology treatment Source Type: blogs
Imagine a country where citizens will have their genetic profiles integrated into the digital health system with individual risk scores and pharmacogenomic information, so when they go to the doctor, they will get fully personalized, genetic risk-based diagnosis, medication, and preventive measures. That’s where healthcare in Estonia will arrive soon. They started to build their digital health system 20 years ago, and within the next years, the Baltic country will start to reap the benefits of a transparent, blockchain-based, digital health system hooked on genetic data. The first fully digitized republic certainly s...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Healthcare Policy analysis digital digital democracy digital health digital health strategy digital health system digital healthcare Estonia genetics genomics personalized Personalized medicine pharmacogenomi Source Type: blogs
Gui-Jiang Wei1,2, Ming-Qing Yuan1, Li-He Jiang1, Yu-Lan Lu3, Chun-Hong Liu3, Hong-Cheng Luo3, Hua-Tuo Huang3, Zong-Quan Qi1* and Ye-Sheng Wei1,2* 1Department of Cell Biology, Medical College of Guangxi University, Nanning, China 2Department of Medical Laboratory, Affiliated Hospital of Guilin Medical University, Guilin, China 3Department of Medical Laboratory, Affiliated Hospital of Youjiang Medical University for Nationalities, Baise, China miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs modulating gene expression, and variants in miRNA genes are involved in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke (IS). However, the effect of mi...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 18 April 2019Source: Journal of Sport and Health ScienceAuthor(s): Xin Luan, Xiangyang Tian, Haixin Zhang, Rui Huang, Na Li, Peijie Chen, Ru WangAbstractA growing understanding of the benefits of exercise over the past few decades has prompted researchers to take an interest in the possibilities of exercise therapy. Because each sport has its own set of characteristics and physiological complications that tend to appear during exercise training, the effects and underlying mechanisms of exercise remain unclear. Thus, the first step in probing exercise effects on different diseases is the s...
Source: Journal of Sport and Health Science - Category: Sports Medicine Source Type: research
Conclusions and Perspectives In this review, we have discussed important milestones from the early description of “Serum-sickness” as being due to antibodies directed against Neu5Gc epitopes all the way to the present-day therapeutic implications of these antibodies in cancer therapy. Some of these milestones have been represented in a concise timeline (Figure 6). While the “Xenosialitis” hypothesis is well-supported in the human-like mouse models, it has yet to be conclusively proven in humans. It remains to be seen if “Xenosialitis” plays a role in other uniquely-human diseases. FI...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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