A Pregnant Woman With Multi-fragmented Giant Cell Tumor of Tendon Sheath: A Rare Anatomical Location.

A Pregnant Woman With Multi-fragmented Giant Cell Tumor of Tendon Sheath: A Rare Anatomical Location. J Am Podiatr Med Assoc. 2019 Sep 05;: Authors: Arican M, Turhan Y Abstract Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) in the foot is a rare pathology and is involved in the differential diagnosis of soft tissue tumors of the foot and ankle. Although it can affect any age group, mainly occurs at the 3rd and 5th decade, with being more common in female. Histopathological examination is a major definitive method for diagnosis, although physical examination and radiological imaging are help-full to reach a diagnosis preoperatively. There are many treatment options but marginal excision is the most commonly used one among them. Here in, A 26-year-old pregnant woman with a multi-fragmented mass which is located at extending from the 1st web space to the plantar aspect of the metatarsophalangeal joint (MTP) of left great toe associated with flexor hallucis longus tendon after trauma. She had pain which worse with activity and wearing shoes. After pregnancy, a marginal excision with dorsal longitudinal incision in 1st web space was performed under spinal anesthesia. The lesion was diagnosed as a localized type tenosynovial giant cell tumor. At the last control on the 23rd month, the patient is doing well and there was no recurrence of the lesion. GCSST should be considered in the differential diagnosis of plantar masses of foot. Although, ıt is frequently se...
Source: Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association - Category: Podiatry Authors: Tags: J Am Podiatr Med Assoc Source Type: research

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(Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2018;43(8):885–889) Spinal-induced hypotension is a common problem resulting from the sympathectomy associated with the administration of intrathecal local anesthetic for cesarean delivery, and is associated with nausea, vomiting, loss of consciousness, impaired fetal oxygenation, and fetal acidosis. Prophylactic phenylephrine infusion is often used to decrease the risk of spinal-induced hypotension; however, its use has been associated with decreased rostral spread of intrathecal local anesthetic in pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to determine the median effective dose (ED50) and 95% ...
Source: Obstetric Anesthesia Digest - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Anesthesia and Analgesia: Regional Anesthesia Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 20 August 2019Source: Anaesthesia &Intensive Care MedicineAuthor(s): Sophie A. Kimber CraigAbstractRegional anaesthetic techniques are the most frequently used type of anaesthetic used for caesarean deliveries. They have a better safety profile than general anaesthesia in the pregnant woman. The choice of whether to use a spinal, epidural or combined spinal–epidural technique will depend on patient and surgical factors. Particular care is required in those receiving therapeutic anticoagulation or with clotting abnormalities. Women should be provided with information regarding th...
Source: Anaesthesia and intensive care medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
AbstractObjectivesFew studies have investigated the prophylactic efficacy of dexmedetomidine (DEX) in postpartum depressive symptoms (PDS). A randomized, double ‐blind, placebo‐controlled trial was conducted to investigate whether the administration of DEX, immediately after delivery and for patient controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA), can attenuate PDS.MethodsSix hundred parturients scheduled for elective caesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia were randomly allocated into the Control group (infusion with 0.9%normal saline after delivery and PCIA with sufentanil) and the DEX group (DEX infusion 0.5ug.kg‐1 aft...
Source: Pharmacotherapy: The Journal of Human Pharmacology and Drug Therapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Original Research Article Source Type: research
Conditions:   Anesthesia, Spinal;   Pain;   Pregnancy;   Cesarean Section Interventions:   Drug: EMLA cream;   Drug: 2% lidocaine Sponsor:   Aga Khan University Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
This is a guest post from one of our patients. She is 32 and recently froze her eggs at Malpani Infertility ClinicOur 20 ’s and early 30's may be theeasiest time to have a baby but it's not always the best time - for a lot of good reasons. We are at the top of our career and want to grow professionally; we want to prepare emotionally and financially to be parents ; and we are unwilling to settle for Mr. RightNow instead of Mr. Right.The problem is that the biological clock is ticking on - and we can hear it loud and clear ! The good news is that with a little medical help , we can freeze time , to plan for the future...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs
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