Penile strangulation intentionally using a rubber band to prevent the development of penile cancer

Publication date: Available online 20 August 2019Source: Urology Case ReportsAuthor(s): Takahiro Yoshida, Daisuke Watanabe, Tadaaki Minowa, Akemi Yamashita, Kunihisa Miura, Akio MizushimaAbstractPenile strangulation is a disease which causes circulatory failure in the distal part of the penis by the penis strangulated by foreign substances, and it is a rare emergency disease in urology. Most of the motives are for pranks, sexual intercourses and treatments of incontinence. We herein report the clinical course of penile strangulation complicated by penile cancer. Although the treatment was completed in accordance with its clinical stage of the penile cancer without any perioperative complications, it was considered that more case studies and further examinations would be needed to determine the treatment plans.
Source: Urology Case Reports - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

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Source: The Journal of Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Urology Practice - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
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Source: Urology Practice - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
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Source: Urology Practice - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
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Source: Current Opinion in Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: OBESITY AND ITS IMPACT ON UROLOGICAL DISEASE: Edited by Richard K. Lee and Christian Seitz Source Type: research
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Source: Urology Practice - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
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