Should you see a chiropractor for low back pain?

This study only included people who were willing to receive chiropractic care. Even within the two groups, the care varied — that is, not everyone in the usual care group received the same treatment, and this can also be said for the chiropractic group. If any of these factors had been different, the results might have been different. For example, it’s possible that if an older population of people with chronic low back pain had been studied, “usual care” might have been the better treatment. Bottom line This new study lends support for chiropractic care to treat low back pain. But it’s important to recognize the limitations of this trial, and keep in mind that treatment side effects were more common among those receiving chiropractic care. In addition, chiropractic treatments aren’t free (although, fortunately, insurance coverage for chiropractic care is becoming more common). This won’t be — and shouldn’t be — the last study of chiropractic care for low back pain. But until we know more, I’ll continue to offer it as one of many treatment options. The post Should you see a chiropractor for low back pain? appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Back Pain Health Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs

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Conclusion: Genetic associations of diseases considerably vary across populations which necessitates health-related genotyping efforts especially for so far understudied populations. SOM portrayal represents novel promising methods in population genetic research with special strength in visualization-based comparison of SNP data. Introduction Non-communicable polygenic diseases such as cancers, neurodegeneration, cardiovascular, and metabolic disorders have become the most prevalent type worldwide and account for the majority of death events in developed and transition economy countries (Habib and Saha, 2010; Benzi...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Abstract Among chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients, workers' compensation is associated with longer term prescription opioid analgesic use (OAU). The aim was to study the association between receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits and course of OAU. This prospective cohort study utilized data from primary care patients diagnosed with non-cancer CLBP. The outcomes were morphine equivalent dose (MED) - categorized as no OAU, 1-50mg MED, or>50mg MED - and change in MED over time using mixed multinomial logistic regression models. Covariates included sociodemographics, pain severity, pain m...
Source: Pain Physician - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Popul Health Manag Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS:: Our findings show that the intervention did not cause a meaningful change in the hypothesized mediators, and these mediators were not associated with patient-reported outcomes. PMID: 30808203 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Clinical Rehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Tags: Clin Rehabil Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to identify a history of both chronic LBP and PTSD as substantial risk factors for medical discharge from the US Army. PTSD and chronic LBP may mutually reinforce one another and deplete active coping strategies, making Soldiers less likely to be able to continue military service. Future research should target therapies for co-morbid PTSD and chronic LBP as these conditions contribute a substantial increase in risk of medical discharge from the US Army. PMID: 30793196 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Military Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Mil Med Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe healthy lifestyle intervention seems to be cost ‐effective from the societal perspective. However, variability in the sensitivity analyses indicates caution is needed when interpreting these findings.SignificanceThis is an economic evaluation of a randomized controlled trial of a healthy lifestyle intervention for chronic low back pain. The findings suggest that a healthy lifestyle intervention may be cost ‐effective relative to usual care.
Source: European Journal of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
Over the past few years I’ve been pondering the presumed gap between people living with pain and the people who “treat” or work with them.  Most of my readers will know that I live with widespread pain (aka fibromyalgia) or pain that is present in many parts of my body, and the associated other symptoms like DOMS that last for weeks not a day or two, and increased sensitivity to heat, cold, pressure, chilli, sound and so on. I first “came out” with my pain about 15 years ago: that is, I first disclosed to people I worked with that I had this weird ongoing pain – and finally joined...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Professional topics Research Therapeutic approaches inclusion inequality Source Type: blogs
In this study, we analyzed FGF21 levels and alterations in the expression of genes encoding components of the FGF21-responsive molecular machinery in adipose tissue from aged individuals so as to ascertain whether altered FGF21 responsiveness that develops with aging jeopardizes human health and/or accelerates metabolic disturbances associated with aging. We studied a cohort of 28 healthy elderly individuals (≥70 years) with no overt signs of metabolic or other pathologies and compared them with a cohort of 35 young healthy controls (≤40 years). Serum FGF21 levels were significantly increased in elderly indiv...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Study Design. A cross-sectional study of Canadian patients suffering from low back pain (LBP) seeking primary care. Objective. The aim of this study was to determine which existing primary care LBP stratification schema is associated with distinct subpopulations as characterized by easily identifiable primary epidemiological factors. Summary of Background Data. LBP is among the most frequent reasons for visits to primary care physicians and a leading cause of years lived with disability. In an effort to improve treatment response/outcomes in LBP primary care, different classification systems have been proposed in a...
Source: Spine - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Epidemiology Source Type: research
WILLIAMSON, West Virginia — This town on the eastern border of Kentucky has 3,150 residents, one hotel, one gas station, one fire station — and about 50 opiate overdoses each month.On the first weekend of each month, when public benefits like disability get paid out, the local fire chief estimates the city sees about half a million dollars in drug sales. The area is poor — 29 percent of county residents live in poverty, and, amid the retreat of the coal industry, the unemployment rate was 12.2 percent when I visited last August— and those selling pills are not always who you'd expect."Elder...
Source: Psychology of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs
I’ve worked in persistent pain management for most of my career. This means I am biased towards pain management. At times this creates tension when I begin talking to clinicians who work in acute or subacute musculoskeletal pain, because they wonder whether what I talk about is relevant to them. After all, why would someone need to know about ongoing management when hopefully their pain will completely go? I have sympathy for this position – for many people, a bout of tendonosis, or a strained muscle or even radicular pain can ebb away, leaving the person feeling as good as new. While it might take a few months...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: ACT - Acceptance & Commitment Therapy Back pain Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Coping strategies Pain conditions Resilience/Health biopsychosocial healthcare pain management rehabilitation Therapeutic approaches Source Type: blogs
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