Why We Love Advice Columns, According to Psychologists

Taking someone else’s advice, even when you ask for it, is difficult. Entire studies have been conducted just to understand the widespread phenomenon of “advice discounting.” But even as we ignore the well-intentioned suggestions of our friends, families and therapists, many of us come back week after week to the advice columns published by a slew of print and digital media outlets. It’s hard to say exactly how many people read advice columns, but it’s clear that many have built devoted followings over the years. The workplace-focused “Ask a Manager,” for example, receives 2.4 million visits a year and 50 questions a day, writes Alison Green, the author behind that column for the past decade, writes in Vox. Several advice columnists, including Green and Ask Polly’s Heather Havrilesky, have parlayed their success into books. It’s tempting to think the allure of these columns is rooted in schadenfreude. But Lori Gottlieb, the psychotherapist who writes the Atlantic’s “Dear Therapist” column, says the appeal stems from the fact that, though we all feel unique, our problems tend to be shared, at least to some degree. “Readers might say to their friends, ‘I’m reading it because it’s voyeuristic and fun,'” Gottlieb says. “But I think that people are really reading it the same way they’re ‘asking for a friend.’ They really find pieces of their own lives in e...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

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You're reading How Breathwork and Meditation Can Help Counter Feelings of Loneliness and Isolation, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. It seems we are in the middle of a new epidemic, one rooted in feelings of loneliness and isolation. Up to 47 percent of Americans report feeling lonely, double the number from a decade ago. When Cigna and Ipsos surveyed 20,000 U.S. adults 18 and older, 40 percent reported feeling alone and 47 percent said they felt left out. What’s going on here? Why are so many of us ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: depression featured happiness meditation self confidence self improvement Suggested Reading anxiety breathwork Source Type: blogs
AbstractBullying events have frequently been the focus of coverage by news media, including news stories about teens whose death from suicide was attributed to cyberbullying. Previous work has shown that news media coverage is influential to readers in areas such as suicide, infectious disease outbreaks, and tobacco use. News media may be an untapped resource to promote bullying prevention messages, though current news media approaches to describing bullying and cyberbullying remain unexplored. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the current state of news media coverage of bullying and cyberbullying. A sample of news...
Source: Prevention Science - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
After repeated exposure to a piece of information, people will start assuming it’s true, whether or not it actually is, simply because they’ve heard it so many times. Familiarity and repetition can overcome rationality, a phenomenon psychologists call the “illusory truth effect.” In a 24-hour period during the first weekend of August, two mass shootings—one in El Paso, Texas and the other in Dayton, Ohio—left 31 people dead and 53 injured, as of writing. In between “calls for action” and the need for “thoughts and prayers,” legislators across the political spectru...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized health Source Type: news
AbstractMiami is a Southeastern United States (U.S.) city with high health, mental health, and economic disparities, high ethnic/racial diversity, low resources, and the highest HIV incidence and prevalence in the country. Syndemic theory proposes that multiple, psychosocial comorbidities synergistically fuel the HIV/AIDS epidemic. People living with HIV/AIDS in Miami may be particularly affected by this due to the unique socioeconomic context. From April 2017 to October 2018, 800 persons living with HIV/AIDS in a public HIV clinic in Miami completed an interviewer-administered behavioral and chart-review cross-sectional a...
Source: AIDS and Behavior - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Conclusions: These findings highlight a vulnerable population of polysubstance users with chronic pain, and indicates the need for more comprehensive assessment and treatment of chronic pain.
Source: Journal of Addiction Medicine - Category: Addiction Tags: Original Research Source Type: research
Colleges around the country are reporting more cases of depression, anxiety, and suicide among students than ever before. Psychologist B. Janet Hibbs joined CBSN to discuss her new book, "The Stressed Years of Their Lives," and the mental health challenges facing students and their parents.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
In a world of social companion robots, chatbots, or artificial intelligence buddies, adults have the responsibility to teach kids well how to live a healthy life with the available technologies, how to balance between the online and the offline world, how to keep their mental stability in the face of innovations. As it’s an awfully difficult job, we collected examples where digital health technology could help and in which areas should analog methods prevail. The land where kindergarteners play with the texture of raspberry When was the last time you paid attention to the crunching sounds while eating a raw ca...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers apps children cognitive health digital health digital literacy eating fitness health apps health literacy healthy eating healthy lifestyle Innovation kids mental health physical Source Type: blogs
Happy June, sweet readers! This week’s Psychology Around the Net is packed with information about exercise and anxiety (and it’s probably not what you’re expecting), the unhealthy relationship between self-worth and professional achievements, the new official definition of work-related burnout, and more. Can Working Out Make Your Anxiety Worse? Experts Weigh In: You probably associate exercise with anxiety in the way that exercise is a great way to manage anxiety, and that’s true — just not true for everyone. Holistic psychiatrist Ellen Vora, M.D. and gynecologist and obstetrician Anna Cabeca,...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Psychology Around the Net achievements Anthony Rostain anxiety campus mental health Children chronic workplace stress college Emily Esfahani Smith Exercise Janet Hibbs kids military school counseling services self-worth Seth Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 21 May 2019Source: Neuroscience &Biobehavioral ReviewsAuthor(s): Angela Jacques, Nicholas Chaaya, Kate Beecher, Syed Aoun Ali, Arnauld Belmer, Selena BartlettAbstractIn 2016 the World Health Organization reported 39% of the world’s adult population (over 18 y) was overweight, with western countries such as Australia and the United States of America at 64.5% and 67.9% respectively. Overconsumption of high fat/sugar containing food and beverages contribute to the development of obesity. Neural plasticity that occurs as a result of long term sugar consumption has been shown to redu...
Source: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Conclusions: The use of antidepressants, especially SNRIs, was associated with a shorter survival time of sCJD patients. The possible changes in neurotransmitters should be emphasized. Scientifically, this study may provide insights into the mechanism of CJD. Clinically, it may contribute to the early diagnosis of CJD.IntroductionDepression is common in the elderly. Its prevalence rate is as high as 11.19%, and this increases progressively with worsening cognitive impairment (1). The presence of depression is an acknowledged risk factor for dementia (2); it can even double the risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) (3, 4)...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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