Cancer screening rates dip with appointments later in day

Cancer screening rates are lower in patients who see their primary care doctors...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Women benefit from ACA's ban on mammography co-pays Earlier colon screening saves lives -- but at what cost? Why are CT colonography use rates trending downward? Primary doctors can help boost mammography compliance How has the ACA affected breast cancer screening?
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news

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Health-Related Complications of Acromegaly—Risk of Malignant Neoplasms Marek Ruchala*† and Kosma Wolinski† Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Internal Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznań, Poland The issue of increased risk of benign and malignant neoplasms in patients with acromegaly remains the topic of debate from many years and was addressed by numerous studies. Many of them have shown increase in the cancer incidence. Among particular types of malignancies, thyroid, colorectal, and breast cancer are most commonly indicated as associated with acromegaly. Single ...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Discussion: Our results demonstrated that cancer risk was not increased in our MS population; but age and sex different distribution may partly drive cancer risk. Higher cancer risk in MS patients switching more than two DMTs should take into account in treatment decision making. Introduction Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a severe acquired autoimmune neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with extremely variable disease course, that usually affects persons in their third/four decades of life, even if late onset is described (1). Women had a prevalence/incidence rate approximately double than men (...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Radiation oncologist Dr. Andrea McKee believes deaths from lung cancer — including those related to asbestos exposure — could be reduced significantly by increased utilization of early CT screening. McKee, chair of radiation oncology at Lahey Hospital and Medical Center in Burlington, Maine, has been a strong proponent of early screening for several years. “We could be saving tens of thousands of lives every year with this,” McKee told The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com. “There is nothing else like it. The life-saving potential is the most important thing that has happened to cancer in my...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Nearly a quarter of U.S. women continue to have out-of-pocket costs for screening...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Vt. passes expanded breast screening coverage bill More women get breast screening after ACA bans copays Study: ACA led to more early-stage cancer diagnoses New USPSTF mammography guidelines serve up more of the same ACA ups colon, breast cancer screening in newly insured
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
As a pharmacist, Kathy James considers herself well educated about the importance of getting regular cancer screenings. Even though the 55-year-old had no history of cancer in her family, she never skipped her regular mammograms, and she gave herself regular breast exams. So she was dumbfounded when, during one of those self-exams in May 2017, she felt a marble-size lump in her left breast. A visit to the doctor confirmed it. “The radiologist came in with his hands in his pockets and looked down and said, ‘It doesn’t look good,'” James says. After a biopsy, James and her husband learned she had meta...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized breast cancer news Frontiers of Medicine Source Type: news
This study analyzed data from women over 40 and compared the size of breast cancers at the time of diagnosis detected in the 1970s (before mammography became common) with the size of tumors detected between 2000 and 2002, when screening mammography was routine. Treatments and rates of death due to breast cancer 10 years after the diagnosis were also analyzed. The study found that: As more women underwent routine screening mammograms, more small breast cancers were detected. Many of these tumors were restricted to the ducts within the breast (called ductal carcinoma in situ), and even without treatment would never threaten...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Source Type: blogs
Clinical Significance of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 for Breast Cancer &Adenocarcinomas of Various Internal Organs and Alzheimer's Brain with Increased β-amyloid (1-42); Combined Use of Optimal Doses of Vitamin D3 and Taurine 3 times/day Has Significant Beneficial Effects of Anti-Cancer, Anti-Ischemic Heart, and Memory &Other Brain Problems By Significant Urinary Excretion of Viruses, Bacteria, and Toxic Metals &Substances. Acupunct Electrother Res. 2016;41(2):127-134 Authors: Omura Y Abstract Human Papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) has a significant role in various cancers and Alzheime...
Source: Acupuncture and Electro-Therapeutics Research - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Acupunct Electrother Res Source Type: research
h;r M Abstract BACKGROUND: In 1998, the Storting unanimously adopted the introduction of nationwide mammography screening in Norway. Mammography screening has been the subject of scientific debate, but there has been little research on the political arguments for a public screening programme. In this article I analyse the arguments put forward at that time for nationwide mammography screening. MATERIAL AND METHOD: A document analysis of proposals to the Storting was performed, and recommendations and minutes of debates in the Storting that dealt with nationwide mammography screening. The documents are from th...
Source: Tidsskrift for den Norske Laegeforening - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen Source Type: research
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling Let us sing the praises of good medical screening tests. These are the tests that can detect medical problems before they become untreatable and before they cause complications or even death. Even better are those screening tests that detect “predisease” — abnormalities that aren’t dangerous on their own but can lead to problems later. According to the US Preventive Services Task Force, relatively few screening tests are considered good enough to routinely recommend for adults, including mammography for breast cancer (women) Pap smear for cervical cancer (women) b...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Cancer Health Prevention Screening Source Type: blogs
Cancer screening can save lives. Mammographies reduce the chance women will die of breast cancer; and colonoscopies reduce the chance people will die of colon cancer. But should my 93-year-old father receive a screening colonoscopy? The test is uncomfortable, carries risks, and costs money. Even more importantly, my dad probably won’t live long enough to benefit from the test. That’s why most medical experts think people like my dad—people unlikely to live another decade—should not receive cancer screening tests like colonoscopies. But how in the heck is my dad’s doctor supposed to deliver thi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Geriatrics Primary Care Source Type: blogs
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