The importance of proteinuria in preeclampsia and its predictive role in maternal and neonatal outcomes.

The importance of proteinuria in preeclampsia and its predictive role in maternal and neonatal outcomes. Hypertens Pregnancy. 2019 Apr 02;:1-8 Authors: Tanacan A, Fadiloglu E, Beksac MS Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate impact of 24-h proteinuria level in preeclampsia on maternal/perinatal outcomes. METHODS: Singleton pregnancies with preeclampsia delivered after 24 weeks of gestation were included. Patients were divided into mild (0.3 to
Source: Hypertension in Pregnancy - Category: OBGYN Tags: Hypertens Pregnancy Source Type: research

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Abstract OBJECTIVE: Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-associated condition initiated by placental factors. We have demonstrated that placental extracellular vesicles (pcEVs) cause hypertension and proteinuria in pregnant and non-pregnant mice. STUDY DESIGN: An observational study with both case-control and longitudinal designs. SETTING: A single center at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tianjin Medical University. POPULATION: We collected blood samples and clinical information from 54 PE patients, 33 normally pregnant women with at 30-36 gestational weeks and on postpartum days 1 and 4 f...
Source: BJOG : An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: BJOG Source Type: research
The definition of preeclampsia is changing. However, with the addition of organ symptoms to the presence of hypertension in pregnancy instead of relying only on proteinuria, a more precise detection of women at risk for preeclampsia-associated adverse events has not been achieved. Instead, under the new definitions of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) as well as of the International Society of Hypertension in Pregnancy (ISSHP), more women are classified as preeclamptic, with a tendency to milder disease.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Expert Review Source Type: research
Abstract Preeclampsia (PE) is a complication of pregnancy characterized by hypertension (HTN-Preg), and often proteinuria. If not managed promptly, PE could lead to eclampsia and seizures. PE could also lead to intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and prematurity at birth. Although PE is a major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Also, there is a wide variability in the incidence of PE. ranging between 2 to 8% of pregnancies, in the Eastern, Western and Developing world, suggesting regional differences in the risk factors and predictors of the pregnancy-re...
Source: Biochemical Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Biochem Pharmacol Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewPreeclampsia (PE) is a complex human pregnancy-specific condition and is clinically characterized by new onset hypertension and proteinuria in the second half of pregnancy. The precise etiology of PE is unknown, but much of the pathophysiology has been elucidated, and it is accepted that the disorder is multifactorial in nature. Historically, because of the presence of proteinuria, the role of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) has been considered in the etiology of PE. However, the results of studies (including maternal circulatory angiotensin II, urinary angiotensinogen, plasma renin...
Source: Current Hypertension Reports - Category: Primary Care Source Type: research
In this study, our aim was to evaluate the activity of eNOS and TrxR enzymes and the amounts of calcium, zinc, and selenium elements in serum of women with preeclampsia. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty preeclampsia and 30 healthy pregnant women were enrolled in the study after clinical examination and confirmation by Obstetrician-Gynecologist. Venous blood samples were collected and the activity of NOS, TrxR enzymes, and the concentration of zinc, calcium, and selenium elements were measured in serum. RESULTS: The results of NOS and TrxR activities showed significant decreases in preeclampsia compared with control group (p
Source: Clinical and Experimental Hypertension - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Clin Exp Hypertens Source Type: research
Qualitative and/or quantitative measurement of urine protein excretion is one of the most common tests performed during pregnancy. For more than 100 years, proteinuria was necessary for the diagnosis of preeclampsia, but recent guidelines recommend that proteinuria is sufficient but not necessary for the diagnosis. Still, in clinical practice, the majority of patients with gestational hypertension will be diagnosed with preeclampsia based on the presence of proteinuria. While the reference standard for measuring urinary protein excretion is a 24-hour urine collection, spot urine protein creatinine ratio is a reasonable &ld...
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Expert Review Source Type: research
Qualitative and quantitative measurement of urine protein excretion is one of the most common tests performed during pregnancy. For more than 100 years, proteinuria was necessary for the diagnosis of preeclampsia, but recent guidelines recommend that proteinuria is sufficient but not necessary for the diagnosis. Still, in clinical practice, most patients with gestational hypertension will be diagnosed as having preeclampsia based on the presence of proteinuria. Although the reference standard for measuring urinary protein excretion is a 24-hour urine collection, spot urine protein-to-creatinine ratio is a reasonable &ldquo...
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Expert Review Source Type: research
ills JL Abstract Preeclampsia, a pregnancy disorder that includes hypertension and proteinuria, is a major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Some studies, but not all, have found that women with preeclampsia have significantly lower iodine levels than healthy pregnant women. Resolving this issue is important because iodine deficiency in pregnancy is common in the USA and parts of Europe including Finland. We conducted a nested case-control study to determine whether the risk for preeclampsia is associated with iodine status. We measured serum iodine, thyroglobulin (Tg), and thyroid stimulating h...
Source: Biological Trace Element Research - Category: Biology Authors: Tags: Biol Trace Elem Res Source Type: research
Preeclampsia is a complex cardiovascular disorder of pregnancy with underlying multifactorial pathogeneses; however, its etiology is not fully understood. It is characterized by the new onset of maternal hypertension after 20 weeks of gestation, accompanied by proteinuria, maternal organ damage, and/or uteroplacental dysfunction. Preeclampsia can be subdivided into early- and late-onset phenotypes (EOPE and LOPE), diagnosed before 34 weeks or from 34 weeks of gestation, respectively. Impaired placental development in early pregnancy and subsequent growth restriction is often associated with EOPE, while LOPE is associated w...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
The diagnostic criteria for preeclampsia have evolved from the traditional definition of de novo hypertension and proteinuria to a broader definition of hypertension with evidence of end-organ dysfunction. While this change is endorsed by various societies such as the International Society for the study of Hypertension in Pregnancy (ISSHP) and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), there remains controversy with regards to the implementation of broader definitions, and the most appropriate definition of end-organ dysfunction.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Original Research: Obstetrics Source Type: research
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