Unraveling the role of the MOV10 RNA helicase during influenza A virus infection

Moloney leukemia virus 10 (MOV10) is an interferon-inducible RNA helicase that has been implicated in a broad range of cellular functions, including modulating the replication of a diverse range of viruses. However, the mechanisms by which MOV10 promotes or inhibits the replication of particular viruses have not been well defined. A recent paper published in the Biochemical Journal by Li et al. [Biochem. J. (2019) 476, 467–481] provides insight regarding the mechanisms by which MOV10 restricts influenza A virus (IAV) infection in host cells. First, the authors confirm that MOV10 binds to the viral nucleoprotein (NP) and sequesters the viral ribonucleoprotein complex in cytoplasmic granules called processing (P)-bodies, thus inhibiting IAV replication. Second, they demonstrate that the non-structural (NS)1 protein of IAV can act as an antagonist of MOV10, inhibiting the association of MOV10 with NP and promoting MOV10 degradation through the lysosomal pathway. Further research will determine if cellular RNA helicases such as MOV10 represent suitable targets for the development of novel anti-IAV therapies.
Source: Biochemical Journal - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Commentaries Source Type: research

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Pigs are important livestock and comprehensive understanding of their immune responses in infections is critical to improve vaccines and therapies. Moreover, similarities between human and swine physiology suggest that pigs are a superior animal model for immunological studies. However, paucity of experimental tools for a systematic analysis of the immune responses in pigs represent a major disadvantage. To evaluate the pig as a biomedical model and additionally expand the knowledge of rare immune cell populations in swine, we established a multicolor flow cytometry analysis platform of surface marker expression and cellul...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Publication date: 14 May 2019Source: Cell Reports, Volume 27, Issue 7Author(s): Elisabeth Braun, Dominik Hotter, Lennart Koepke, Fabian Zech, Rüdiger Groß, Konstantin M.J. Sparrer, Janis A. Müller, Christian K. Pfaller, Elena Heusinger, Rebecka Wombacher, Kathrin Sutter, Ulf Dittmer, Michael Winkler, Graham Simmons, Martin R. Jakobsen, Karl-Klaus Conzelmann, Stefan Pöhlmann, Jan Münch, Oliver T. Fackler, Frank KirchhoffSummaryGuanylate-binding protein (GBP) 5 is an interferon (IFN)-inducible cellular factor reducing HIV-1 infectivity by an incompletely understood mechanism. Here, we show that this...
Source: Cell Reports - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Marjolein Schluck1,2, Roel Hammink1,2, Carl G. Figdor1,2,3, Martijn Verdoes1,3*† and Jorieke Weiden1,2,3*† 1Department of Tumor Immunology, Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands 2Division of Immunotherapy, Oncode Institute, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands 3Institute for Chemical Immunology, Nijmegen, Netherlands Traditional tumor vaccination approaches mostly focus on activating dendritic cells (DCs) by providing them with a source of tumor antigens and/or adjuvants, which in turn activate tumor-reactive T c...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Hiromi Kubagawa1*, Kazuhito Honjo2, Naganari Ohkura3, Shimon Sakaguchi3, Andreas Radbruch1, Fritz Melchers1* and Peter K. Jani1* 1Deutsches Rheuma-Forschungszentrum, Berlin, Germany2Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, United States3Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan It is now evident from studies of mice unable to secrete IgM that both non-immune “natural” and antigen-induced “immune” IgM are important for protection against pathogens and for regulation of immune responses to self-antigens. Since iden...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Joanna Mikulak1,2, Elena Bruni1,2, Ferdinando Oriolo1,2, Clara Di Vito1 and Domenico Mavilio1,2* 1Unit of Clinical and Experimental Immunology, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Milan, Italy 2Department of Medical Biotechnologies and Translational Medicine, University of Milan, Milan, Italy The liver is considered a preferential tissue for NK cells residency. In humans, almost 50% of all intrahepatic lymphocytes are NK cells that are strongly imprinted in a liver-specific manner and show a broad spectrum of cellular heterogeneity. Hepatic NK (he-NK) cells play key roles in tuning liver immune response in b...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusion and Perspectives Being exquisitely regulated by “writers,” “erasers,” and “readers,” additional repelled proteins or miRNAs, m6A modification relates to nearly any step of mRNA metabolism, as well as ncRNA processing and circRNA translation. There is compelling evidence suggesting that m6A modification is especially critical in a variety of pathologic and physiologic immune responses including T cell homeostasis and differentiation, inflammation, and type I interferon production. Further results have indicated that aberrancies of interferon and Th17 frequencies in systemic lu...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusions and Future Perspectives It is now evident that NK/ILC family plays a pivotal role in the immune defenses. Recent studies in murine and human settings demonstrated that the expression of several inhibitory checkpoints, that may be detrimental in the tumor context, is not restricted to T lymphocytes, revealing an important, yet poorly appreciated, contribution of their expression on innate immune cells. Thus, in the recent years different immunotherapy approaches, based on the blockade of inhibitory NK cell receptors, have been developed in order to unleash NK cell cytotoxicity. This is particularly important in...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusions: In conclusion, we report our 3-year experience about the frequency and seasonality of respiratory viruses in children with cancer.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Hematology Oncology - Category: Hematology Tags: Online Articles: Original Articles Source Type: research
Authors: Popova EA, Ovsepyan GK, Protas AV, Erkhitueva EB, Kukhanova MK, Yesaulkova YL, Zarubaev VV, Starova GL, Suezov RV, Eremin AV, Ostrovskii VA, Trifonov RE Abstract 3'-Azidothymidine (AZT) reacts with 1-propargyl-5-R-1H- and 2-propargyl-5-R-2H-tetrazoles (R = H, Me, CH2COOEt, CH2CON(CH3)2, Ph, 2-CH3-C6H4, or 4-NO2-C6H4) via the Cu(I)-catalyzed asymmetric [3 + 2] cycloaddition to give 3'-modified thymidine analogs incorporating 1H-1,2,3-triazolyl, 1H-, and 2H-tetrazolyl fragments in 41-76% yield. The structures of the obtained compounds have been elucidated by means of HRESI+-MS, 1H...
Source: Nucleosides, Nucleotides and Nucleic Acids - Category: Biochemistry Tags: Nucleosides Nucleotides Nucleic Acids Source Type: research
María Maximina B. Moreno-Altamirano1*, Simon E. Kolstoe2 and Francisco Javier Sánchez-García1* 1Laboratorio de Inmunorregulación, Departamento de Inmunología, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Mexico City, Mexico 2School of Health Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, United Kingdom Over the last decade, there has been significant advances in the understanding of the cross-talk between metabolism and immune responses. It is now evident that immune cell effector function strongly depends on the metabolic pathway in w...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
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