Additional early active repetitive motor training did not prevent contracture in adults receiving task-specific upper limb training after stroke: a randomised trial

ConclusionIn adults who are already receiving task-specific motor training for upper limb rehabilitation following stroke, 5 weeks of up to 1 hour of additional daily active repetitive motor training using the SMART Arm device did not prevent or reduce contracture in upper limb muscles.Trial registrationACTRN12614001162606.
Source: Journal of Physiotherapy - Category: Physiotherapy Source Type: research

Related Links:

In the middle of the night, I wake up feeling warm. I open the window and pull my hair back into a ponytail and drink some water. Then I glance at my phone, delete a few things, and see some spam. I hit unsubscribe and go back to bed. Then I lie there thinking, What if by opening that spam email I got myself hacked? What if I just sent everyone in my contact list a Burger King ad at two in the morning? Now wide awake, I move on to other concerns: my parents’ health, my stepson’s college tuition, pending deadlines. Hours roll by. I tackle real-life math problems: how many weeks I have before getting my next free...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Gen X healthy sleep insomnia Source Type: news
By AMEYA KULKARNI, MD When Samuel Morse left his New Haven home to paint a portrait of the Maquis du Lafayette in Washington DC, it was the last time he would see his pregnant wife. Shortly after his arrival in Washington, his wife developed complications during childbirth. A messenger took several days on horseback to relay the message to Mr Morse. Because the trip back to New Haven took several more, his wife had died by the time he arrived at their home.  So moved was he by the tragedy of lost time that he dedicated the majority of the rest of his life to make sure that this would never happen to anyone again. H...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Policy Medical Practice Ameya Kulkarni Global Health Maternal mortality public health Source Type: blogs
Pocket-size ultrasound devices that cost 50 times less than the machines in hospitals (and connect to your phone). Virtual reality that speeds healing in rehab. Artificial intelligence that’s better than medical experts at spotting lung tumors. These are just some of the innovations now transforming medicine at a remarkable pace. No one can predict the future, but it can at least be glimpsed in the dozen inventions and concepts below. Like the people behind them, they stand at the vanguard of health care. Neither exhaustive nor exclusive, the list is, rather, representative of the recasting of public health and medic...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized HealthSummit19 technology Source Type: news
Mind-reading exoskeletons, digital tattoos, 3D printed drugs, RFID implants for recreational purposes: mindblowing innovations come to medicine and healthcare almost every single day. We shortlisted some of the greatest ideas and developments that could give us a glimpse into the future of medicine, but we found so many that we had trouble fitting them into one article. Here are the first ten spectacular medical innovations to watch for. 1) Mixed reality opens new ways for medical education Augmented, virtual, and mixed reality are all technologies opening new worlds for the human senses. While the difference between...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine 3d printing artificial food brain-computer interface cyborg digital tattoos drug development exoskeleton gamification google glass health insurance Healthcare Innovation List Medical education medical techn Source Type: blogs
Cardiac rehabilitation (CR), or “cardiac rehab,” is a multifaceted, medically supervised program proven to improve heart health and outcomes in people with certain types of cardiovascular disease. CR revolves around three major components: an individualized exercise and training program, education on topics related to heart health, and stress reduction. CR is currently recommended for the following diagnoses: angina (chest pain); heart attack with or without angioplasty or bypass surgery; heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF); and heart surgery including heart valve procedures or heart or heart/l...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Exercise and Fitness Health Heart Health Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Self-reported pre-sleep somatic symptoms are a marker of comorbid anxiety and, potentially chronic pain, impacting nighttime sleep. The optimal cutoff scores of 14 and 20 proposed herein can help clinicians with case formulation, with tailoring BSM treatments and their targets. PMID: 31545084 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Behavioral Sleep Medicine - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Behav Sleep Med Source Type: research
Conclusions Health care could be substantially improved if all medical specialties would be familiar with BPD, its pathology, medical and psychiatric comorbidities, complications, and treatment. In mental health care, several empirically validated treatments that are applicable in a wide range of clinical settings are available.
Source: Psychosomatic Medicine - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Tags: CLINICAL APPLICATIONS Source Type: research
This study elucidates the potential to use mitochondria from different donors (PAMM) to treat UVR stress and possibly other types of damage or metabolic malfunctions in cells, resulting in not only in-vitro but also ex-vivo applications. Gene Therapy in Mice Alters the Balance of Macrophage Phenotypes to Slow Atherosclerosis Progression https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/07/gene-therapy-in-mice-alters-the-balance-of-macrophage-phenotypes-to-slow-atherosclerosis-progression/ Atherosclerosis causes a sizable fraction of all deaths in our species. It is the generation of fatty deposits in blood vessel...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This popular science article from the AARP is representative of the sort of outsider's view of the longevity industry that is presently dominant. On the one hand, it is good that the media and advocacy organizations such as AARP are finally talking seriously about treating aging as a medical condition. On the other hand, the author looks at two of the most popular areas of development, mTOR inhibitors and senolytics, in a way that makes them seem more or less equivalent, and then further adds diet and exercise as another equivalent strategy. This will be continuing issue, I fear. People, as a rule, don't think about size o...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
This study sought to investigate what could be learned from how these men have fared. The men were born in 1925-1928 and similar health-related data from questionnaires, physical examination, and blood samples are available for all surveys. Survival curves over various variable strata were applied to evaluate the impact of individual risk factors and combinations of risk factors on all-cause deaths. At the end of 2018, 118 (16.0%) of the men had reached 90 years of age. Smoking in 1974 was the strongest single risk factor associated with survival, with observed percentages of men reaching 90 years being 26.3, 25.7, ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
More News: Australia Health | Pain | Physiotherapy | Rehabilitation | Sleep Disorders | Sleep Medicine | Statistics | Stroke | Training | Universities & Medical Training