Long-term hormone use after menopause tied to Alzheimer's risk

(Reuters Health) - Women who take hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to ease menopause symptoms like hot flashes and night sweats may be slightly more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease, a large Finnish study suggests.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

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Molecules, Vol. 25, Pages 3291: Royal Jelly—A Traditional and Natural Remedy for Postmenopausal Symptoms and Aging-Related Pathologies Molecules doi: 10.3390/molecules25143291 Authors: Andreea Bălan Marius Alexandru Moga Lorena Dima Sebastian Toma Andrea Elena Neculau Costin Vlad Anastasiu Women’s life stages are based on their reproductive cycle. This cycle begins with menstruation and ends with menopause. Aging is a natural phenomenon that affects all humans, and it is associated with a decrease in the overall function of the organism. In women, aging is related with and starts with men...
Source: Molecules - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
MRI scans show that accumulated iron in the outer layer of the brain is linked...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: fMRI shows dementia patients' brain response to music New Alzheimer's definition relies on imaging biomarkers DTI-MRI ties lack of fitness to cognitive decline Flortaucipir-PET could lead in early Alzheimer's detection PET study links menopausal status to Alzheimer's
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
Loss of estrogen related to menopause may explain why women are much more likely than men to develop Alzheimer disease, new research suggests.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - Category: Pathology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news
FRIDAY, June 26, 2020 -- Women have more Alzheimer's disease-related changes in the brain than men, and this may be linked to hormonal disruptions at menopause, researchers say. " About two-thirds of people living with Alzheimer's are women, and the...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
DISCUSSION: These results may explain why women have higher dementia incidence compared to men after age 85, the age with the highest number of dementia cases. PMID: 32573980 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Journal of Alzheimers Association - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimers Dement Source Type: research
Abstract Women are at significantly greater risk of developing Alzheimer's disease and show higher prevalence of autoimmune conditions relative to men. Women's brain health is historically understudied, and little is therefore known about the mechanisms underlying epidemiological sex differences in neurodegenerative diseases, and how female-specific factors may influence women's brain health across the lifespan. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the immunology of pregnancy and menopause, emphasizing that these major immunological and hormonal transition phases may play a critical part in women's brain...
Source: Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: Front Neuroendocrinol Source Type: research
A reduction in reproduction hormones from menopause may reduce cognitive function in women and increase risk for Alzheimer’s, according to a study published in theJournal of Alzheimer’s.News Medical
Source: Society for Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news
Conclusions: In subjects with MCI, more rapid decline in metabolism in temporal regions critical to verbal memory ability occurred in women than in men, along with more rapid deterioration in verbal memory performance, and the rate of loss of metabolic activity was accelerated by factors genetically predisposing them to eventually developing AD.
Source: Journal of Nuclear Medicine - Category: Nuclear Medicine Authors: Tags: Neurology & amp; Psychiatry (Poster Session) Source Type: research
A new PET technique can visualize early Alzheimer's disease by imaging the...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: fMRI shows dementia patients' brain response to music New Alzheimer's definition relies on imaging biomarkers Flortaucipir-PET could lead in early Alzheimer's detection PET study links menopausal status to Alzheimer's FDG-PET links physical activity to healthy brains
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
AbstractEstrogens play a crucial physiological function in the brain; however, debates exist concerning the role of estrogens in Alzheimer ’s disease (AD). Women during pre-, peri-, or menopause periods are more susceptible for developing AD, suggesting the connection of sex factors and a decreased estrogen signaling in AD pathogenesis. Yet, the underlying mechanism of estrogen-mediated neuroprotection is unclarified and is complicat ed by the existence of estrogen-related factors. Consequently, a deeper analysis of estrogen receptor (ER) expression and estrogen-metabolizing enzymes could interpret the importance of ...
Source: Molecular Neurobiology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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