NYC Rats Are Even Grosser Than You Thought

Rats are a part of daily life in New York as they scurry about subway tracks and garbage heaps. However, even though the creatures been neighbors of New Yorkers for centuries, researchers are still learning exactly how these rodents could affect the health of millions. In a recently released study from scientists at Columbia University, researchers confirmed the fears of every New Yorker. These ubiquitous pests are housing dangerous bacteria including E. Coli, Salmonella and viruses including the deadly Seoul Hantavirus.
Source: ABC News: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Related Links:

Publication date: 1 December 2018Source: Materials Science and Engineering: C, Volume 93Author(s): Anasuya Roy, Mangala Joshi, B.S. Butola, Sahil MalhotraAbstractWith increasing demand for novel and potent antimicrobial agents to combat cross-infections and infectious diseases, silver and copper based nanoparticles (NPs) deposited over supports such as montmorillonite (MMT) are playing a crucial role in shaping the current research scenario. Although materials based on Ag NP and Cu NP on MMT have been reported, its toxicological properties on human cell lines have not been accounted for. This paper reports a comparative st...
Source: Materials Science and Engineering: C - Category: Materials Science Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 20 August 2018Source: Journal of Food EngineeringAuthor(s): Su Yeon Kim, In Hee Bang, Sea. C. MinAbstractEffects of packaging parameters on the inactivation of Salmonella contaminating mixed vegetables in plastic packages using atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge cold plasma treatment (ADCPT) were investigated. The inactivation rate of indigenous aerobes of grape tomatoes in low density polyethylene packaging (1.2 log CFU/tomato) was higher than that in polyethylene terephthalate packaging (0.8 log CFU/tomato). Increasing oxygen concentration in the package headspace by 85% did not a...
Source: Journal of Food Engineering - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 20 August 2018Source: Journal of Microbiological MethodsAuthor(s): Yuhui Du, Huiying Li, Zhiqiu Yin, Antoni Rozalski, Agnieszka Torzewska, Pan Yang, Chengqian Qian, Tingting Xu, Hengchun Cao, Pan Wu, Lingyan Jiang, Xi Guo, Di Huang, Bin LiuAbstractProvidencia is an opportunistic human pathogen that belongs to the Enterobacteriaceae family. The bacterial cell surface O-antigen is one of the most structurally variable cell constituents and serves as a basis for serotyping gram-negative bacteria. In this work, the genomes of 12 Providencia strains were sequenced, and genes driving O-antigen ...
Source: Journal of Microbiological Methods - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 20 August 2018Source: European Polymer JournalAuthor(s): Davood Kharaghani, Yun Kee Jo, Muhammad Qamar Khan, Yeonsu Jeong, Hyung Joon Cha, Ick Soo KimAbstractNanofiber membranes for biomedical filtration devices require antibacterial activity to prevent bacterial contamination under moisture conditions while exhibiting biocompatibility. Here, we propose an antibacterial membrane filter composed of electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers with a surface functionalized with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by a facile wetting process for in situ silver reduction under physiologically mild...
Source: European Polymer Journal - Category: Chemistry Source Type: research
Tetracycline-responsive transcriptional activator driven by the liver-specific mouse albumin promoter (Alb-tTA).TheE. Coli tetracycline operon regulatory system was used to generate a liver-specific transcription activation system that was inhibited by tetracycline. The transcription activator was a fused protein consisting of a tetracycline repressor gene (tetR) that was only active in the presence of tetracycline and a herpes simplex virus protein (VP-16) transcription activating domain. Transcription was induced only in the absence of tetracycline (Tet-Off). A liver-specific promoter such as mouse albumin determined tha...
Source: NIDDK Research Materials - Category: Research Source Type: research
The following is a guest blog post by Michael Archuleta, Founder and CEO of ArcSYS, where he shares his experience as a caregiver for his father trying to navigate the healthcare system. My dad is 99 years old. Having moved him to Utah 6 months ago into a retirement home, our first step was to get an appointment with a new primary care physician. I brought along a list of his medications and watched the nurse tediously look up and enter each into the EHR. Dad and the doctor got along great on that first visit. She assured us that she could help manage his medications. There was nothing realistically that could be done to r...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Health Care Healthcare Healthcare Interoperability HealthCare IT Patient Advocacy Patients ArcSys Michael Archuleta Patient Stories UpDox Source Type: blogs
This study investigates how exercise training with or without hypoxic exposure affects the bactericidal activity and subsequent apoptosis of neutrophils following strenuous exercise. A total of 60 healthy, sedentary men were randomly divided into four groups (n = 15 in each group), who were exposed to 21% O2 [normoxic control (NC)] or 15% O2 [hypoxic control (HC)] at rest or were trained at 50% of peak work rate at 21% O2 [normoxic training (NT)] or 15% O2 [hypoxic training (HT)] for 30  min/day, 5 days/week for 4 weeks. Before the intervention, acute strenuous exercise (SE) enhanced the phagoc...
Source: European Journal of Applied Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Journal of Medicinal ChemistryDOI: 10.1021/acs.jmedchem.8b01112
Source: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry - Category: Chemistry Authors: Source Type: research
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Researchers from MIT and the University of Naples Federico II found that fragments of the protein pepsinogen, an enzyme used to digest food in the stomach, can kill bacteria such as Salmonella and E. coli. Such peptides could potentially be developed as new antibiotics.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
by Sonia Verma, Urmila Jagtap, Anita Goyala, Arnab Mukhopadhyay Diet profoundly affects metabolism and incidences of age-related diseases. Animals adapt their physiology to different food-types, modulating complex life-history traits like aging. The molecular mechanisms linking adaptive capacity to diet with aging are less known. We identify FLR-4 kinase as a novel modulator of aging inC.elegans, depending on bacterial diet. FLR-4 functions to prevent differential activation of the p38MAPK pathway in response to diverse food-types, thereby maintaining normal life span. In a kinase-deadflr-4 mutant,E.coli HT115 (K12 strain...
Source: PLoS Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Source Type: research
More News: Gastroenteritis | Hantavirus | Health | Learning | Salmonella | Study | Universities & Medical Training