Cancer patients may experience delayed skin effects of anti-PD-1 therapy

(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Cancer patients receiving anti-PD-1 therapies who develop lesions, eczema, psoriasis, or other forms of auto-immune diseases affecting the skin may experience those adverse reactions on a delay -- sometimes even after treatment has concluded.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

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This study aims to investigate the influence of BAHS and associated skin reactions around the implant. A total of 45 patients were prospectively followed from implantation up to at least 1 year. Swabs were obtained at baseline, 12 weeks follow-up and during cases of inflammation (Holgers score ≥2). The microbiota was assessed using IS-proTM, a bacterial profiling method based on the interspace region between the 16S–23S rRNA genes. Detection of operational taxonomic units, the Shannon Diversity Index, sample similarity analyses and Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) were employed. Staphylococcus ...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Conclusions Epidemiological studies have repeatedly helped identify definitive triggers for several diseases. As highlighted in this perspective report, previous studies strongly argue for the interplay between intrinsic factors and putative preventable extrinsic triggers/promoters for CTCL. Given the evidence of geographical regional clustering of CTCL patients, CTCL occurrence in unrelated family members and recent evidence implicating S. aureus in the pathogenesis/progression of CTCL, more research is needed to decipher the precise mechanism by which specific environmental exposures may be driving the pathogenesis of t...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
François Chassagne1†, Xinyi Huang1†, James T. Lyles1 and Cassandra L. Quave1,2* 1Center for the Study of Human Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States 2Department of Dermatology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States In the search for new therapeutic solutions to address an increasing number of multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens, secondary metabolites from plants have proven to be a rich source of antimicrobial compounds. Ginkgo biloba, a tree native to China, has been spread around the world as an ornamental tree. Its seeds have been used as snacks and medical mater...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
This study was supported by grants from GSK and the UK Medical Research Council (U105178805). Conflict of Interest Statement AM has grant funding from GSK and AstraZeneca/MedImmune. MB, DJ, AP, DT, and AvO are employees of GSK. The remaining authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest. Acknowledgments We are grateful to the Ares staff, genotyping facility, and flow cytometry core for their technical assistance. We thank Jen Walker for advice on the manuscript. Supplementary Material The Supplem...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Walking into the skin care aisle at the pharmacy, stepping up to a counter at a department store, or stopping by a cosmetics shop can be an overwhelming experience. Everywhere you look, you see products touting the ideal skin care ingredient. Who knew buying a moisturizer could be so difficult? Lately, the coverage of “clean” cosmetics is everywhere — on national television and in best-selling books. It’s clear that clean is the newest beauty trend. But what is the clean cosmetics movement, and does the science support it? Regulatory oversight of cosmetics: A brief history The clean cosmetics moveme...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Allergies Health Skin and Hair Care Source Type: blogs
Grains can play havoc with your skin. The prolamin proteins, such as gliadin,  trigger autoimmune skin reactions and turn antibodies against the skin enzymes, their lectins fan the fires of inflammation, their proteins provoke allergies, and their amylopectins send blood sugar and insulin sky-high and provoke the skin-disrupting hormone insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF). The whole grain package adds up to an impressive collection of skin conditions that can take a variety of forms, from simple red, itchy rashes to scaly, oily raised patches to large vesicles to gangrene. B...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates Source Type: blogs
Grains can play havoc with your skin. The prolamin proteins, such as gliadin,  trigger autoimmune skin reactions and turn antibodies against the skin enzymes, their lectins fan the fires of inflammation, their proteins provoke allergies, and their amylopectins send blood sugar and insulin sky-high and provoke the skin-disrupting hormone insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF). The whole grain package adds up to an impressive collection of skin conditions that can take a variety of forms, from simple red, itchy rashes to scaly, oily raised patches to large vesicles to gangrene. B...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates Source Type: blogs
After many years working in downtown San Francisco, dermatologist Holly Christman has left that group for a prestigious practice in Marin. We wish Holly the best--Marin is lucky to have her!For those seeking care in San Francisco, Union Square Dermatology is located in the venerable 450 Sutter Street Building.  The four Board Certified dermatologists provide services such as mole and skin cancer checks, Mohs surgery, management of rosacea, eczema and psoriasis.  The practice is in network with Aetna, Cigna and United Health Care PPO plans and Medicare. Cosmetic options included Botox, fillers, lasers for sun spot...
Source: Skinema, dermatology in the media blog - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Health Source Type: blogs
We describe a 68-year-old female who presented to the dermatology office with a previous history of over 30 BCCs that had been previously biopsied and/or surgically removed. However, the patient had been lost to follow up for several years and had not been seen by a skin specialist. In the interim, she had been misdiagnosed as having eczematous or psoriatic lesions by primary care providers. Patients with Gorlin syndrome are even harder to diagnose as their skin cancers often do not possess the classic features associated with a basal cell or squamous cell carcinoma. When in doubt, and especially if failing topical therapy...
Source: J Pharm Pharm Sci - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: J Pharm Pharm Sci Source Type: research
Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) patients typically present with skin lesions, that seem inflammatory and in the initial disease stages are commonly mistaken for an inflammatory skin disease such as eczema or psoriasis. For inflammatory conditions like psoriasis it has been shown, that the expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMP) in lesional skin differs from healthy skin. With the present study we wanted to characterize the expression of AMPs in the skin of patients with CTCL.
Source: European Journal of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
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