Cancer patients may experience delayed skin effects of anti-PD-1 therapy

(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Cancer patients receiving anti-PD-1 therapies who develop lesions, eczema, psoriasis, or other forms of auto-immune diseases affecting the skin may experience those adverse reactions on a delay -- sometimes even after treatment has concluded.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

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After many years working in downtown San Francisco, dermatologist Holly Christman has left that group for a prestigious practice in Marin. We wish Holly the best--Marin is lucky to have her!For those seeking care in San Francisco, Union Square Dermatology is located in the venerable 450 Sutter Street Building.  The four Board Certified dermatologists provide services such as mole and skin cancer checks, Mohs surgery, management of rosacea, eczema and psoriasis.  The practice is in network with Aetna, Cigna and United Health Care PPO plans and Medicare. Cosmetic options included Botox, fillers, lasers for sun spot...
Source: Skinema, dermatology in the media blog - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Health Source Type: blogs
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Source: J Pharm Pharm Sci - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: J Pharm Pharm Sci Source Type: research
Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) patients typically present with skin lesions, that seem inflammatory and in the initial disease stages are commonly mistaken for an inflammatory skin disease such as eczema or psoriasis. For inflammatory conditions like psoriasis it has been shown, that the expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMP) in lesional skin differs from healthy skin. With the present study we wanted to characterize the expression of AMPs in the skin of patients with CTCL.
Source: European Journal of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle bowel flora fermented foods grain-free Inflammation kefir kimchi kombucha probiotic sibo small intestinal bacterial overgrowth yogurt Source Type: blogs
AbstractThe development of immune checkpoint inhibitors [monoclonal antibodies targeting cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4), programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) or programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1)] represents a major breakthrough in cancer therapy. Although they present a favorable risk/benefit ratio, immune checkpoint blockade therapies have a very specific safety profile. Due to their unique mechanism of action, they entail a new spectrum of adverse events that are mostly immune related [immune-related adverse events (irAEs)], notably mediated by the triggering of cytotoxic CD4+/CD8+  T cell ac...
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