Long-term Effects of Fecal Transplant in Recurrent C. Diff Long-term Effects of Fecal Transplant in Recurrent C. Diff

Treatment of recurrent C. difficile infection with fecal microbiota transplantation has been shown to be safe in the short term, but might there be long-term adverse effects?Alimentary Pharmacology &Therapeutics
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology Journal Article Source Type: news

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Authors: Daniels LM, Kufel WD Abstract INTRODUCTION: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has become a significant healthcare-associated infection and is strongly associated with antibiotic use. Practice guidelines have recently been revised incorporating updated recommendations for diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Areas Covered: This review discusses updated aspects of CDI management. New and emerging pharmacologic options for treatment and prevention are reviewed. Expert opinion: Metronidazole is associated with lower rates of treatment success compared to vancomycin and should no longer be used as primary ...
Source: Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Expert Opin Pharmacother Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: In our cohort, FMT proved to be safe and effective, even in high risk patients. Oral administration in capsules also proved to be safe, well-tolerated, and highly effective for R-CDI. In our experience, the FMT capsule formulation seems feasible in the routine of a hospital. This administration method will allow FMT to be more widely used. PMID: 30221898 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Revista Espanola de Quimioterapia - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Rev Esp Quimioter Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: We resumed ciprofloxacin prophylaxis for the following reasons. There was a significant reduction in febrile episodes, and consequently a sparing effect of antibiotics used for treatment of this condition. No difference in Clostridium difficile colitis occurred and the mortality rate of 8% in group B was unacceptably high. PMID: 30198521 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Biomedical Papers of the Medical Faculty of the Univ Palacky Olomouc Czech Repub - Category: Biomedical Science Tags: Biomed Pap Med Fac Univ Palacky Olomouc Czech Repub Source Type: research
Abstract PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Dysbiosis has been related to the pathophysiology of disorders of - gut-brain interaction (DGBI) including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional constipation (FC). Accordingly, modulation of gut microbiota has been proposed as a potential treatment for these disorders. Gut microbiota modulation can be effected by probiotics, prebiotics, symbiotics, postbiotics, antibiotics and fecal transplantation (FMT) or bacteriotherapy. The latter is currently used for recurrent or severe Clostridium difficile colitis and has been the focus of recent research in IBS and FC. RECENT FINDI...
Source: Current Opinion in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Opin Pharmacol Source Type: research
Headlines lately have been reading: “Probiotics are dangerous” and “Probiotics might not do anything for your gut microbiome—and could even be bad for it.” The headlines were prompted by two recent studies performed by an Israeli group that media interpret as suggesting that probiotics don’t work and may be even be harmful. Is their interpretation accurate? Let’s take a look. The first study, Post-Antibiotic Gut Mucosal Microbiome Reconstitution Is Impaired by Probiotics and Improved by Autologous FMT (fecal microbiome transplant), examined what happened with antibiotic admini...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates bowel flora dysbiosis grain-free health Inflammation prebiotic probiotic sibo small intestinal Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 1 September 2018Source: Journal of the Formosan Medical AssociationAuthor(s): Jiunn-Wei Wang, Chao-Hung Kuo, Fu-Chen Kuo, Yao-Kuang Wang, Wen-Hung Hsu, Fang-Jung Yu, Huang-Ming Hu, Ping-I. Hsu, Jaw-Yuan Wang, Deng-Chyang WuFecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a method to directly change the recipient's gut microbiota to normalize the composition and gain a therapeutic benefit. The history of FMT has been traced back to the 4th century and has been highly regarded since 2013, when the United States Food and Drug Administration approved FMT for treating recurrent and refractory Clostri...
Source: Journal of the Formosan Medical Association - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Abstract Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a method to directly change the recipient's gut microbiota to normalize the composition and gain a therapeutic benefit. The history of FMT has been traced back to the 4th century and has been highly regarded since 2013, when the United States Food and Drug Administration approved FMT for treating recurrent and refractory Clostridium difficile infection. Since then, the range of FMT applications extended rapidly and broadly not only in gastrointestinal disorders, but also in extra-gastrointestinal diseases. Donor selection with questionnaire, interview, blood tests...
Source: J Formos Med Assoc - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: J Formos Med Assoc Source Type: research
Abstract Clostridium difficile is an important cause of health care associated infections. The epidemiology of C. difficile infection (CDI) in children has changed over the past few decades. There is now a higher incidence in hospitalized children, and there has been an emergence of community-onset infection. A hypervirulent strain, North American pulse type 1, has also developed. Neonates and young infants have high rates of colonization but rarely have symptoms. The well-known risk factor for CDI in children age 2 years or older is antibiotic use. Inflammatory bowel disease and cancer are associated with increas...
Source: Pediatric Annals - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Pediatr Ann Source Type: research
Publication date: September 2018Source: Journal of Hospital Infection, Volume 100, Supplement 1Author(s): Benjamin H. Mullish, Mohammed Nabil Quraishi, Jonathan P. Segal, Victoria L. McCune, Melissa Baxter, Gemma L. Marsden, David Moore, Alaric Colville, Neeraj Bhala, Tariq H. Iqbal, Christopher Settle, Graziella Kontkowski, Ailsa L. Hart, Peter M. Hawkey, Horace RT Williams, Simon D. Goldenberg
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Transplant Infectious Disease,Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.
Source: Transplant Infectious Disease - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
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