Alcohol and Smoking and the Risk of Active Tuberculosis Alcohol and Smoking and the Risk of Active Tuberculosis

What is the association between alcohol consumption, smoking, and the risk for active tuberculosis?BMJ Open Respiratory Research
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pulmonary Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news

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Amedeo Modigliani and his "great secret": a brief history of medical and social aspects of tuberculosis in the nineteenth and early twentieth century. Infez Med. 2018 Sep 01;26(3):280-282 Authors: Perciaccante A, Coralli A, Appenzeller O Abstract The pathography of the famous painter and sculptor Amedeo Modigliani (1884-1920) shows that he had tuberculosis and died of tubercular meningitis aged 35. The nineteenth century was characterized by numerous milestones in the history of tuberculosis. In 1853, Hermann Brehmer, first used the term tuberculosis referred to at the time as "phthisis&...
Source: Infezioni in Medicina - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infez Med Source Type: research
It’s complicated. That’s the best way to describe the relationship between alcohol and health. As I’ve written about before, a number of studies have demonstrated health benefits with lower amounts of drinking. But if you drink too much alcohol (especially at inopportune times), there may be significant harms as well. Just how these balance out remains a matter of some debate and controversy. While it’s easy to say “too much alcohol is bad for you” (and then point out the litany of harms caused by alcohol, such as liver disease and motor vehicle accidents), it’s harder to answer th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alcohol Health Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: This study will help recognize tuberculosis patients' characteristics and comorbidities influencing the development and evolution of the disease from an age and gender perspective to enable the development of social and community-based strategies. PMID: 30184347 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Biomedica : Revista del Instituto Nacional de Salud - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Biomedica Source Type: research
A woman with melanoderma, with a previous histopathological diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma in the hard palate central region, reported to not smoking or consuming alcohol during anamnesis. The intrabuccal examination revealed an exophytic lesion, 1  cm in its largest diameter, irregular, showing purplish coloration, painless, and unmodified since the beginning of the diagnostic process. Laboratory tests were negative for HIV, HPV, tuberculosis, and syphilis. Before proceeding for definitive oncological treatment, the histological slides from the initial biopsy were reviewed by an oral pathologist.
Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontics - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Tags: Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Source Type: research
A new study concludes there’s no amount of alcohol consumption that’s safe for overall health — a finding that’s likely to surprise moderate drinkers, and that has left some experts unconvinced. For years, public health officials have said that, while no one should pick up drinking in search of better health, moderate drinking (defined as up to a drink per day for women and up to two per day for men) probably won’t hurt anyone who already imbibes, and may even confer some benefits. This standard is written into the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and is supported by organizations including th...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 23 August 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): GBD 2016 Alcohol CollaboratorsSummaryBackgroundAlcohol use is a leading risk factor for death and disability, but its overall association with health remains complex given the possible protective effects of moderate alcohol consumption on some conditions. With our comprehensive approach to health accounting within the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2016, we generated improved estimates of alcohol use and alcohol-attributable deaths and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) for 195 locations from 1990 to 2016, for bot...
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Worldwide, alcohol use was the seventh-leading risk factor for early death and disability in 2016. It was the top cause for early death and disability among 15- to 49-year-olds, accounting for one in 10 deaths. In this age group, the main causes of alcohol-related deaths were tuberculosis (1.4 percent), road injuries (1.2 percent) and self-harm (1.1 percent), the findings showed.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This study is a stark reminder of the real, and potentially lethal, dangers that too much alcohol can have on our health and that even the lowest levels of alcohol intake increase our risks,” Helen Stokes-Lampard, chair of the Royal College of General Practitioners in the UK, said in a statement. She was not involved in the study. However, countered David Spiegelhalter, the Winton Professor for the Public Understanding of Risk at the University of Cambridge, “Given the pleasure presumably associated with moderate drinking, claiming there is no ‘safe’ level does not seem an argument for abstention. &...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Alcohol CNN The Lancet Source Type: news
Worldwide, alcohol use was the seventh-leading risk factor for early death and disability in 2016. It was the top cause for early death and disability among 15- to 49-year-olds, accounting for one in 10 deaths. In this age group, the main causes of alcohol-related deaths were tuberculosis (1.4 percent), road injuries (1.2 percent) and self-harm (1.1 percent), the findings showed.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
(The Lancet) Globally, one in three people drink alcohol (equivalent to 2.4 billion people), and 2.2 percent of women and 6.8 percent of men die from alcohol-related health problems each year. Alcohol use was ranked as the seventh leading risk factor for premature death and disability worldwide in 2016, and was the leading cause for people aged 15-49 years old. In this age group, it is associated with tuberculosis, road injuries, and self-harm.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news
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