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EMS Physicians Endorse First Responder Opioid Safety Guidance Developed by Major U.S. Toxicology Orgs

The National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) announces its endorsement of a new American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) and American Academy of Clinical Toxicology (AACT) document detailing pragmatic and actionable safety precautions for first responders in opioid overdose situations. NAEMSP is an organization of physicians and other professionals partnering to provide leadership and foster excellence in the subspecialty of EMS medicine. In pursuing its mission to improve out-of-hospital emergency medical care, NAEMSP’s Executive Board and Standards and Clinical Practice Committee voted unanimously to endorse the opioid safety guidance. This crucial document enables an appropriate and measured communication of risk, allowing first responders to understand their genuine risk of exposure and avoid unnecessary fear or over-preparing to a point where they’re impaired in performing their job. “NAEMSP wholly endorses this impressive and highly-anticipated document and we will share it with our members and build on it with actionable guides that will be available for free to the public,” said Dr. Brent Myers, President of NAEMSP. “It’s important that our community act upon the most recent and best quality evidence available to us right now, as well as to stay vigilant and prepared to revise our procedures and advise our members as we continue to develop knowledge about dangerous substances.” Over the last year, ACMT and...
Source: JEMS Operations - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Industry News Operations Source Type: news

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Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle autoimmune gluten grain-free grains Inflammation low-carb Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
A coalition of 41 states' attorneys general have served five major opioid manufacturers with subpoenas seeking information about how these companies marketed and sold prescription opioids. The coalition is also demanding documents and information related to distribution practices from three drug distributors. The investigative subpoenas and document requests were sent to pharmaceutical manufacturers Endo International, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd./Cephalon Inc. and Allergan. The group also served a supplemental investigative subpoena to Purdue Pharma. Documents were also requested of three ...
Source: Policy and Medicine - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
As so often happens, a frantic mother called us about her 19-year-old daughter, who I’ll call Jen. A heroin addict, Jen had been shuttled between multiple treatment centers and sober homes by greedy marketers looking to cash in on the teenager’s insurance benefits by keeping her perpetually in recovery, but never sober. As our investigator searched Palm Beach County for Jen, her mother finally reached her by phone. She pleaded with her daughter to leave Florida, to which Jen replied, “Why would I come home? I have all I need here.” In the ensuing months, Jen has become a victim of a vicious cycle kn...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Addiction Affordable Care Act Drugs Health Care Source Type: news
As so often happens, a frantic mother called us about her 19-year-old daughter, who I’ll call Jen. A heroin addict, Jen had been shuttled between multiple treatment centers and sober homes by greedy marketers looking to cash in on the teenager’s insurance benefits by keeping her perpetually in recovery, but never sober. As our investigator searched Palm Beach County for Jen, her mother finally reached her by phone. She pleaded with her daughter to leave Florida, to which Jen replied, “Why would I come home? I have all I need here.” In the ensuing months, Jen has become a victim of a vicious cycle kn...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Addiction Affordable Care Act Drugs Health Care Source Type: news
3.5 out of 5 stars Controversies and carfentanil: We have much to learn about the present state of opioid poisoning. Cole JB, Nelson LS. Am J Emerg Med 2017 Aug 24 [Epub ahead of print] Reference I have argued — both in a post on this blog and a column in Emergency Medicine News — that the idea of a “heroin overdose” is a completely outdated concept that is never coming back. The fact is, when a patient comes in today with a history of shooting or snorting heroin, none of us have any firm idea about exactly what drug or drugs were involved. The chance that such a patient was exposed only to heroin i...
Source: The Poison Review - Category: Toxicology Authors: Tags: Medical carfentanil fentanyl opiates opioids Source Type: news
BACKGROUND In response to the growing prescription drug overdose (DO) epidemic in the U.S., an Injury Surveillance Workgroup on Poisoning (ISWP) released Consensus Recommendations for National and State Poisoning Surveillance in April 2012. The ISWP propos...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news
Over the last 30years North America has witnessed a tremendous rise in prescription opioid abuse, addiction, overdose, and death [1]. It is now clear that this was in large part an iatrogenic epidemic with a multifaceted etiology with contributions made from nearly every specialty in medicine [2-6]. In response, the medical establishment moved to reduce opioid prescribing, create abuse deterrent formulations, implement prescription drug monitoring programs, and expand access to medication-assisted therapy, all with limited success.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
WASHINGTON, D.C. – The National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) announces its endorsement of a new American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) and American Academy of Clinical Toxicology (AACT) document detailing pragmatic and actionable safety precautions for first responders in opioid overdose situations. NAEMSP is an organization of physicians and other professionals partnering to provide leadership and foster excellence in the subspecialty of EMS medicine. In pursuing its mission to improve out-of-hospital emergency medical care, NAEMSP’s Executive Board and Standards and Clinical Practice Committe...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Patient Care Industry News Source Type: news
Conclusion and Recommendations More intervention-based clinical trials are needed to provide a strong alternative candidate therapy for management of opiate use disorder. Buprenorphine, although a promising candidate, should be researched more regarding treatment retention and patient satisfaction before any conclusions can be made regarding its standard use for opiate substitution maintenance treatment of pregnant patients with opiate use disorder. Heroin-assisted treatment still cannot be considered in opiate addicts refractory to MMT; more data should be collected regarding efficacy in larger participant populations un...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue General Review buphernorphin heroin methadone opiate opiate addiction treatment withdrawal Source Type: research
The United States is currently in the midst of a public health crisis due to the opioid epidemic. A record number of individuals —47,055—died of a drug overdose (OD) in 2014.1 Although the drug poisoning death rate has been highest among 45- to 54-year-olds, an increase in mortality has also been seen in youth. Poisoning deaths among adolescents increased by 91% between 2000 and 2009, largely due to an increase in OD from prescription drugs.2 All physicians, both pediatric and adult, are needed to change the course of the opioid epidemic.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Clinical perspectives Source Type: research
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